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Time Bomb Under Yellowstone = 90,000 Immediate Deaths and Nuclear Winter in US

  1. #16
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    Hot lava gives me indigestion.

    That will be one big burp.

  2. #17
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    Yellowstone Park's Volcanic Activity Monitoring

    Just love Yellowstone and worry a bit about its volatility, so I found this website and check it regularly. Last week there were no reports of any seismic activity, but over 3 days, there was activity from the west at a depth of 10miles, moving to the east with the depth decreasing to about 2miles. Just hope it will never again erupt, that would effect the entire world.....
    https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes...toring_47.html

  3. #18
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    Thanks for that link. I monitor things like this too. Here are a couple more for Yellowstone. One shows seismograms in the area, and the other links to web cams in the area including a live web cam for Old Faithful.

    Yellowstone Seisomgrams

    Yellowstone web cams
    Granny B. & Mr. B.'s website (check out our Match Game and Cool Links): www.breaktimehq.com

  4. #19
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    what are you monitoring that will aid you if there is an eruption? if it blows it will make mt. st. helens look like a firecracker. many years ago a volcano in indonesia blew and the resultant pollution caused a major weather change, so much so that there was literally no spring in the U.S.

  5. #20
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    I monitor earthquake activity around the world because it fascinates me, I love earth and space science. If one looks at earthquakes over a period of time it's possible to see trends–notice, I did not say "make predictions." Monitoring earthquake activity is just another way to have a "heads up."

    We all have the tools at hand, thanks to the internet, to make our own weather forecast to some degree, monitor earthquakes, sunspots, volcanoes, ocean temperatures or Arctic ice-melt, view the earth from space, view space, etc., etc. It's certainly more productive and satisfying than spending time keeping up with the ninnies and the idiocy in the world.
    Granny B. & Mr. B.'s website (check out our Match Game and Cool Links): www.breaktimehq.com

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deucemoi View Post
    what are you monitoring that will aid you if there is an eruption? if it blows it will make mt. st. helens look like a firecracker. many years ago a volcano in indonesia blew and the resultant pollution caused a major weather change, so much so that there was literally no spring in the U.S.
    Monitoring is great because I am disabled and it will take me additional time to get my head between my legs so I can kiss my butt goodbye!

  7. #22
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    I've always been fascinated by volcano and earthquake activity. I monitor world activity but simply as a point of interest rather than as a warning system. This link shows 'quake activity. If interested, look the site over. There are perimeters that can be adjusted to show certain areas, strength, etc and offers of means of notification. For instance, I get emails if anything greater than a '5' happens anywhere in world.

    https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/map/

    Many years ago when I visited Alaska, I spent a day at the Alaska Earthquake Center in Palmer, AK. Fascinating to watch machines recording them as they happen.
    Life is an adventure to those with the courage to explore.

  8. #23
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    The Yellowstone hotspot erupts approximately every 600,000 years. The last eruption was 640,000 years ago. It's classed as a super volcano. Something for worriers to worry about.
    I am a nutritional overachiever.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timetrvlr View Post
    The Yellowstone hotspot erupts approximately every 600,000 years. The last eruption was 640,000 years ago. It's classed as a super volcano. Something for worriers to worry about.
    I remember that! I was at home polishing my rock that night, so you can't blame it on me.
    If we're ever in a situation where I am "the voice of reason", then we are in a very, very bad situation.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by hauntedtexan View Post
    Just love Yellowstone and worry a bit about its volatility, so I found this website and check it regularly. Last week there were no reports of any seismic activity, but over 3 days, there was activity from the west at a depth of 10miles, moving to the east with the depth decreasing to about 2miles. Just hope it will never again erupt, that would effect the entire world.....
    https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes...toring_47.html
    Fear not, the likelihood of eruption is another hoax, perpetuated by scaremongers. https://watchers.news/2014/09/01/yel...no-super-hoax/

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by hauntedtexan View Post
    Monitoring is great because I am disabled and it will take me additional time to get my head between my legs so I can kiss my butt goodbye!
    If Yellowstone were to erupt again, kissing your tail goodbye would be about all that most of us would be able to do. A massive eruption of this caldera would decimate most of the U.S. within hours, and probably have a drastic effect on the global climate for years. However, given that there is little or nothing that humans can do to prevent such natural calamities, including things like an asteroid hitting the planet, there is little to be gained by worrying about such an event...if it happens, it happens.
    Things get better with age....I'm approaching Magnificent.

  12. #27
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    I agree with Don and Haunted, I don't actively monitor Yellowstone or worry about it too much, just hope it doesn't blow or we're all screwed.

  13. #28
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    Amazing swarm currently shaking Yellowstone! 2 weeks ago it was almost blank
    https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes...toring_47.html

  14. #29
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    thanks for the link. i t was interesting to watch

  15. #30
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    Exclamation Supervolcano May Erupt Faster Than They Thought

    Photos, video and more here.


    If the supervolcano underneath Yellowstone erupts again, we may have far less advance warning time than we thought.

    After analyzing minerals in fossilized ash from the most recent mega-eruption, researchers at Arizona State University think the supervolcano last woke up after two influxes of fresh magma flowed into the reservoir below the caldera.

    And in an unsettling twist, the minerals revealed that the critical changes in temperature and composition built up in a matter of decades. Until now, geologists had thought it would take centuries for the supervolcano to make that transition.

    Today, Yellowstone National Park owes much of its rich geologic beauty to its violent past. Wonders like the Old Faithful geyser and the Grand Prismatic Spring are products of the geothermal activity still seething below the park, which is driven in turn by the vast magma plume that feeds the supervolcano.

    About 630,000 years ago, a powerful eruption shook the region, spewing forth 240 cubic miles’ worth of rock and ash and creating the Yellowstone caldera, a volcanic depression 40 miles wide that now cradles most of the national park.

    That eruption left behind the Lava Creek Tuff, the ash deposit that Shamloo and her ASU colleague Christy Till used for their work, which they presented in August at a volcanology meeting in Oregon. The pair also presented an earlier version of their study at a 2016 meeting of the American Geophysical Union.

    Based on fossil deposits like this one, scientists think the supervolcano has seen at least two other eruptions on this scale in the past two million years or so. Lucky for us, the supervolcano has been largely dormant since before the first people arrived in the Americas. While a handful of smaller belches and quakes have periodically filled the caldera with lava and ash, the last one happened about 70,000 years ago.

    In 2011, scientists revealed that the ground above the magma chamber bulged by up to 10 inches in a span of about seven years.

    "It's an extraordinary uplift, because it covers such a large area and the rates are so high," the University of Utah's Bob Smith, an expert in Yellowstone volcanism, told National Geographic at the time.

    The swelling magma reservoir responsible for the uplift was too deep to create fears of imminent doom, Smith said, and instead the caldera’s gentle “breathing” offered valuable insights into the supervolcano’s behavior.

    In 2012, another team reported that at least one of the past super-eruptions may have really been two events, hinting that such large-scale events may be more common than thought.

    But almost everyone who studies Yellowstone’s slumbering supervolcano says that right now, we have no way of knowing when the next big blast will happen. For its part, the U.S. Geological Survey puts the rough yearly odds of another massive Yellowstone blast at 1 in 730,000—about the same chance as a catastrophic asteroid collision.

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