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Country images you don't see much anymore

  1. #436
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    Quote Originally Posted by NancyNGA View Post
    Inside a tobacco sharecropper house in Person County, North Carolina, 1939.



    Three things are interesting to me:

    Homemade table and bench. Two of my aunts, both with many children, had dining tables made like picnic tables, with benches instead of chairs.

    Oilcloth tablecloth.

    Oil lamp. Glass pattern is called beaded peanut. One of the larger and more popular oil lamps made.

    Attachment 37084
    I like the glass of spoons on the table!

    EAPG spooners were used as a symbol of hospitality years ago and the humble glass of spoons in the picture sends the same message.

  2. #437
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
    I like the glass of spoons on the table!

    EAPG spooners were used as a symbol of hospitality years ago and the humble glass of spoons in the picture sends the same message.
    Bea, I'd never heard of spooners before! Do you collect EAPG glass?

    I used to collect oil lamps, until I got too many of them and nowhere to put them. Ha! Nothing fancy, just simple ones.

    EAPG Clear Glass Hobnail Pattern spooner

    spooner.jpg

  3. #438
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    IMG_2533.JPG This was a picture taken during the depression showing the demise of the American farmer.
    Seen it all, done it all, can't remember most of it.

  4. #439
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    Quote Originally Posted by NancyNGA View Post
    Bea, I'd never heard of spooners before! Do you collect EAPG glass?

    I used to collect oil lamps, until I got too many of them and nowhere to put them. Ha! Nothing fancy, just simple ones.

    EAPG Clear Glass Hobnail Pattern spooner

    spooner.jpg
    When I was little my Grandmother took care of me, while my parents worked, and she used to collect EAPG. I absorbed quite a bit of information and she used to like to have me explain the different patterns to people with very bored expressions on their faces, LOL!

    I pick up odds and ends of EAPG when I see it for a dollar or two. The spooner in the picture is what I know as moon and star, pieces have different names in different parts of the country or when made by different companies. When I was younger I used the clear goblets to put homemade jelly in and seal with paraffin, they make nice little gifts. I use the spooners and celery vases for cut flowers that I snitch from along the side of the road or around the foundations of old houses, they seem to go together.

    Truth be told I enjoy the thrill of the hunt for things that have a connection with the past more than I enjoy owning them, it brings back memories and it's cheap entertainment!

  5. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
    ...Truth be told I enjoy the thrill of the hunt for things that have a connection with the past more than I enjoy owning them, it brings back memories and it's cheap entertainment!
    You know what?! Now that you mention it, I think it's the same with me. The fun part was finding the lamps and "getting to first know them." Now they are gathering dust, and I'm even afraid to light them when the power goes out, because the glass might crack.

    Maybe we should mention, EAPG = Early American Pressed Glass, or Pattern Glass.

  6. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by NancyNGA View Post
    You know what?! Now that you mention it, I think it's the same with me. The fun part was finding the lamps and "getting to first know them." Now they are gathering dust, and I'm even afraid to light them when the power goes out, because the glass might crack.

    Maybe we should mention, EAPG = Early American Pressed Glass, or Pattern Glass.
    I think you should dust off a couple of them and use them on a regular basis so it is no big deal to fire them up when the lights go out.

    I've read that the old timers believed that if you wrapped your lamp chimneys in a cloth or put them into an old sock, then gently into a pan of cold salt water, brought the water to a gentle simmer for fifteen minutes, allowed the chimneys to cool in the water it would prevent the chimneys from cracking when the lamp was lit. Some people even suggested letting them simmer on the back of the stove for twenty-four hours.

    This is an example of a Hitchcock lamp that was made in Watertown NY. It has a key wound clock spring in the base that powers a fan to pull more air into the burner.



    Later they developed this sidewinder that was a little safer to operate.


  7. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
    This is an example of a Hitchcock lamp that was made in Watertown NY. It has a key wound clock spring in the base that powers a fan to pull more air into the burner.
    I've never heard of a fan in a lamp. That is really cool. No, better say neat, or hot. Maybe I'll dust a couple of mine off and post them here.

    Btw, I tried lighting two in one room once when the power went off in the winter. The fumes started to get to me after a while. Lamp oil, not kerosene. Don't know how folks got along with just those. Went to bed early in the winter probably.

  8. #443
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    The lamps remind me of a Christmas story, by Johnny Cash....how they took a jar of coal oil to a sharecropper's porch on Christmas.
    Jim

  9. #444
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    Sardine Tin Emergency Oil Lamp
    Jim

  10. #445
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  11. #446
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    Tending the garden, Vanier College, Quebec - 1950's


  12. #447
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    You don't see many large families anymore.

    Appalachian Baby Boom: LIFE With Kentucky's 'Fruitful Mountaineers'
    (from an article in LIFE Magazine, December, 1949)

    "Waltis Kilburn's family on Trace Branch of Cutshin Creek is one of Leslie County Kentucky's biggest. All his 14 children, ranging in age from three months to 25 years, were delivered by midwives. Mrs. Kilburn (left) is satisfied 'with just what come.'."




    More Pictures from Leslie County

  13. #448
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    Seen it all, done it all, can't remember most of it.

  14. #449
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    Pappy, that is a beautiful scene. I've been wanting to change my desktop background and this was perfect. So glad you shared it.

  15. #450
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