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Hiking }Camping

  1. #16
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    Mar 2012
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    USA
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    28,569
    Have fun Leah, good that you're planning early!




  2. #17
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    Apr 2017
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    Mi
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaBreeze View Post
    Have fun Leah, good that you're planning early!

    Thank you lol and I love this haha Leah

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Central California
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    3,633
    My idea of the perfect camping trip is to go deep into the wild, enjoying the flower & fauna, birds & animals, streams and water falls and take long walks through it all and then check into a nice Marriott or Sheraton, take a hot SPA. have a great meal and sleep that night 0n clean crisp sheets. I had enough of the RUFFING IT. In my case, I am one hour away from Yosemite and would stay at the Ahwahnee Hotel.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Florida and New Jersey
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    202
    Quote Originally Posted by Leah View Post
    We are in Michigan.There are a few trails here that we have found that should not be to bad for us to hike .The one trail that I know my husband and I would love to do is the A.T .But I know at my age there's no way that I could complete​t one but for him I would certainly give it my best shot ...Leah
    OMG, what beautiful country.
    I'll bet there are tons of easy, short, trails to camp on or just hike for a few miles.
    I was on the U.P. last summer and was blown away by the beauty of the area.
    Before that when I thought Michigan I thought Detroit.

    Boy was I wrong about your state.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpwspringer View Post
    Be conservative starting out. Some trails may be harder than you think. It is better to wish you had done a little longer hike than to have taken on more than you should have. If a particular hike is hard for you, then it is hard for you. If it isn't, it isn't... it doesn't matter whether it was for Joe or Sally, etc. You kind of have to get calibrated on what your abilities are and if you do it often enough without over doing it, you will build up your hiking muscles and endurance so you can do a little more each time and enjoy it a little more.

    And you have to figure out the gear that works for you, particularly socks and shoes. I found out that cotton socks were bad news for me. Same with boots or waterproof foot wear. Those were blister city for me if I hiked over a certain distance. I went with synthetic socks and trail runners or light weight, breathable, low cut hiking shoes that are about a size too large. I hiked in the mountains and had to do that to save my toe nails on long, steep descends... your feet slide forward more in that type of footwear than they do with boots.
    Anything mostly cotton should be avoided at all cost, it's the worst fabric for campers/hickers and is least recommended as it retains sweat and for cold weather doesn't retain heat very well. Stick with synthetics and silk liners are good for a variety of things. Of course for colder seasons, wool is good also for layering. Layering is best, so you may pair down or up and avoid big and bulky wear if possible.

    I made all the mistakes in the beginning, cotton, cotton, cotton. Jeans, bad, but many people still wear them, they're just not the best hiking/camping material, soooo not breathable, some of the newer stretch blends are pretty good. I can't say enough good things about layering. Your base layer should be something that will keep moister from sticking to you, this is so important, polyesters and silks works well here, middle layer, fleece or natural fiber is good, I like merino wool, this to keep you warm. Your outer layer should be a material that's water repellent and breathable it's all going to depend on time of season as well, you want something wind resistant. You will modify all according to budget. You don't need to break the bank and can be quite economical, but, for those where money isn't an object, they make all kinds of clothing to suit the purpose just for these purposes, seasons be damned, all accompanied by sticker shock for some of us. LOL!
    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Mi
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by AprilT View Post
    Anything mostly cotton should be avoided at all cost, it's the worst fabric for campers/hickers and is least recommended as it retains sweat and for cold weather doesn't retain heat very well. Stick with synthetics and silk liners are good for a variety of things. Of course for colder seasons, wool is good also for layering. Layering is best, so you may pair down or up and avoid big and bulky wear if possible.

    I made all the mistakes in the beginning, cotton, cotton, cotton. Jeans, bad, but many people still wear them, they're just not the best hiking/camping material, soooo not breathable, some of the newer stretch blends are pretty good. I can't say enough good things about layering. Your base layer should be something that will keep moister from sticking to you, this is so important, polyesters and silks works well here, middle layer, fleece or natural fiber is good, I like merino wool, this to keep you warm. Your outer layer should be a material that's water repellent and breathable it's all going to depend on time of season as well, you want something wind resistant. You will modify all according to budget. You don't need to break the bank and can be quite economical, but, for those where money isn't an object, they make all kinds of clothing to suit the purpose just for these purposes, seasons be damned, all accompanied by sticker shock for some of us. LOL!
    Thank you for all of the wonderful information I will certainly keep all of this in mind ..Leah

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    A galaxy far far away
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    Just found some good articles

    Oh and something I highly recommend, some clothing bug repellent spray at the very least spray for the skin. There are dozens of other things I'm sure I could come up with. How I miss my camping days, of course I wasn't far from amenities and take out if I truly just had to have some Chinese food before night hours.

    http://www.thehikinglife.com/gear/clothing-2/

    This one covers the different seasons

    http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/a/1107...or-Each-Season
    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Mi
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by AprilT View Post
    Just found some good articles

    Oh and something I highly recommend, some clothing bug repellent spray at the very least spray for the skin. There are dozens of other things I'm sure I could come up with. How I miss my camping days, of course I wasn't far from amenities and take out if I truly just had to have some Chinese food before night hours.

    http://www.thehikinglife.com/gear/clothing-2/

    This one covers the different seasons

    http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/a/1107...or-Each-Season
    I hear you on the Chinese food lol my husband has been researching everything he can get his hands on about gear needed etc .Thank you so much for the information and links ..Leah

  9. #24
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    Sep 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leah View Post
    I hear you on the Chinese food lol my husband has been researching everything he can get his hands on about gear needed etc .Thank you so much for the information and links ..Leah

    You are very welcome. So hope you both have a great time, I always did, except the time I almost froze to death, nah, I even had a great time then.
    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    518
    All kinds of good advice concerning clothing and footwear. You mentioned age as a concern which should be a concern. You also said in July which depending on the thumb or lower Mich. the temp can be high 70's to mid 80's on average. That kind of temp combined with humidity understanding body water loss vs. distance is something that should be known. The weight of a U S gallon of water is about 10lbs. Accounting for that weight while hiking can make a differance. Age does have it's disadvantage especially when it comes to trips & falls. Knowing if there is communication possible "cell phone reception" a must & closest medical facility if you don't have to be assisted out for an injury.

    Hiking marked trails instead of being adventurous and exploring the unknown recommended. Might sound silly but if there are bears where you plan to try hiking be aware that they have a great sense of smell and do go after easy food sources.

    One of the best experiences a couple can have is hiking to enjoy your time together and see America up close & personal.

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