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Literature & Poetry

  1. #16
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    Rkunsaw, I loved Big Ed and was hoping you'd post it- I remember you posted it a long time ago, elsewhere. I even read it to my grandson, who laughed like I did.

  2. #17
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    Lara, I also enjoyedA Nautical Ballad!

  3. #18
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    Another poem I've known since childhood, weird but just listening to the video while reading the words brought a tear near the end.

    JOYCE KILMER - TREES

    Alfred Joyce Kilmer (1886-1918) was a young American poet who suffered a tragic death in World War I at the age of 31. His poem Trees is probably the most quoted poem in American history.

    Joyce Kilmer was born in Brunswick, New Jersey. Following graduation from Columbia University in 1908, he married Aline Murray on June 9, 1908. They had five children - Kenton, Michael, Deborah, Rose, and Christopher. His first collection of poetry, Summer of Love, was published in 1911, and was well received. However, it was the publication of Trees that established his reputation as a major American poet.

    Trees was first published in August 1913 in Poetry Magazine, and then became the title poem in his second collection in 1914, Trees and Other Poems. He became quite prolific and produced three publications in 1917: Literature in the Making, Main Street and Other Poems, and Dreams and Images: An Anthology of Catholic Poets. A Catholic convert in 1913, his poetry exhibits humility and a deep respect for God and nature.

    Kilmer joined the National Guard and was transferred to France in October of 1917, where he was shot and killed in the line of duty on July 30, 1918. He was buried there at Oise-Aisne, Fere-eu-Tardenois, and received the Croix de Guerre of France. The Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest in North Carolina was named after him.

    We include the poem Trees, The Singing Girl, and his last poem, written on the battlefield in France during World War I six weeks before his death, The Peacemaker.


    TREES

    I think that I shall never see
    A poem lovely as a tree.

    A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
    Against the earth's sweet flowing breast;

    A tree that looks at God all day,
    And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

    A tree that may in Summer wear
    A nest of robins in her hair;

    Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
    Who intimately lives with rain.

    Poems are made by fools like me,
    But only God can make a tree.

    written February 2, 1913



  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lara View Post
    oops, I edited my post #9. The syllable count for a 3-line Haiku is correctly 5-7-5.
    Lara, there is an alternative form of haiku that consists of 11 morae (syllables), in three lines of 3, 5, and 3, that has become more popular than traditional 17 morae haiku. It's growing popularity is probably because it requires more skill.

  5. #20
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    Cap'n, thank you for that reminder. The 3-5-3 syllable count Haiku would be less fun for me than the 5-7-5 because I enjoy a little more freedom to fully express. The former is too confining but that's just me.

    I like easier crossword puzzles than the one in the NY Times too. The Thomas Joseph-King syndicated one in the daily newspaper is my speed. I used to do it everyday with my mother by phone. The one who finished first would call and go over the answers. Both speed and accuracy are good for the brain (not that kind of speed lol). We had a lot of fun with it. She passed a year ago and I haven't touched it...but now that I'm reminded, it's time to get back to it.

    SeaBreeze, I can't believe this. I'm embarrassed to admit it but, even though the Joyce Kilmer's Tree poem is the most familiar of all poems, at my age I never knew there was more to it than the first 2 lines. I always thought it was Minimalist poetry. That's all I've ever seen as far as I can remember...which may not be that far these days. What a treat because it's a beautiful poem and the last two lines are so humble.

    Here's another Ballad of the Sea...

    The Sea Gypsy

    I AM fevered with the sunset,
    I am fretful with the bay,
    For the wander-thirst is on me
    And my soul is in Cathay.

    There's a schooner in the offing,
    With her topsails shot with fire,
    And my heart has gone aboard her
    For the Islands of Desire.

    I must forth again to-morrow!
    With the sunset I must be
    Hull down on the trail of rapture
    In the wonder of the sea.

    Richard Hovey
    "If we all hold hands we can't fight"...sam the dot man

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lara View Post
    Cap'n, thank you for that reminder. The 3-5-3 syllable count Haiku would be less fun for me than the 5-7-5 because I enjoy a little more freedom to fully express. The former is too confining but that's just me.
    I thought you did quite well, actually.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lara View Post
    SeaBreeze, I can't believe this. I'm embarrassed to admit it but, even though the Joyce Kilmer's Tree poem is the most familiar of all poems, at my age I never knew there was more to it than the first 2 lines. I always thought it was Minimalist poetry. That's all I've ever seen as far as I can remember...which may not be that far these days. What a treat because it's a beautiful poem and the last two lines are so humble.
    I was never really a poetry buff Lara, and I only knew the first two stanzas. When you started this thread though, a few poems I knew of years ago just popped into the ol' noggin'.

  8. #23
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    I just knew the first stanza of this well know poem, actually used to sing it with a little tune.

    The Barefoot Boy

    by John Greenleaf Whittier

    Blessings on thee, little man,
    Barefoot boy, with cheek of tan!
    With thy turned-up pantaloons,
    And thy merry whistled tunes;
    With thy red lip, redder still
    Kissed by strawberries on the hill;
    With the sunshine on thy face,
    Through thy torn brim's jaunty grace:
    From my heart I give thee joy—
    I was once a barefoot boy!

    O, for boyhood's painless play,
    Sleep that wakes in laughing day,
    Health that mocks the doctor's rules,
    Knowledge never learned of schools,

    O, for boyhood's time of June,
    Crowding years in one brief moon,
    When all things I heard or saw
    Me, their master, waited for.
    I was rich in flowers and trees,
    Humming-birds and honey bees;
    Mine the sand-rimmed pickerel pond,
    Mine the walnut slopes beyond,
    Mine, on bending orchard trees,
    Apples of Hesperides!

    Cheerily, then, my little man,
    Live and laugh, as boyhood can!
    Though the flinty slopes be hard,
    Stubble-speared the new-mown sward,
    Every morn shall lead thee through
    Fresh baptisms of the dew;
    Every evening from thy feet
    Shall the cool wind kiss the heat:
    All too soon these feet must hide
    In the prison cells of pride,
    Lose the freedom of the sod,
    Like a colt's for work be shod,
    Ah! that thou couldst know thy joy,
    Ere it passes, barefoot boy!

    "The Barefoot Boy" by John Greenleaf Whittier. 1855. Public domain.


  9. #24
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    Oct 2013
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    I like "Big Ed."

    Also like some of these:
    Over the wintryforest,
    winds howl in rage

    with no leaves to blow.

    by Soseki (1275-1351)

  10. #25
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    Oct 2013
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    Also, one of my long time favorites is Jennny Joseph's, "Warning."

  11. #26
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    After 1992 and because the Japanese use sound whereas the English use syllables due to the differ3endce in the two languages, free form is now also used to write Haiku poetry. As
    this:

    across the arroyo

    deep scars
    of a joy ride

  12. #27
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    May 2014
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    Pennsylvania, USA
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    Jim

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