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Floating trashcans....

  1. #1
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    Floating trashcans....

    After facilitating a successful crowdfunding campaign in 2016, a floating vacuum for ocean pollution is sucking up hundreds of pounds of litter around the world.



    The Seabin is an ocean trashcan that tidies up marinas, bays, and bodies of water by sucking up rubbish from the surrounding area. The device can collect up to 44 pounds (20 kilograms) of trash, including tiny plastic microbeads that are 2 millimeters small.

    Collectively, the contraptions are capable of salvaging half a ton of garbage every year – and because fish are discouraged from approaching the Seabin due to the sound of its water pump motor, it causes zero harm to marine life.

    The Seabin Project was launched by two Australian surfers who were sick and tired of finding trash in their beloved oceans. After they developed the eco-friendly contraption, they managed to raise over $250,000 on their Indiegogo page to finance manufacturing – and now, the little rubbish bins are being deployed all over the world.

    In addition to a Seabin being set adrift in Sydney Harbor this week, the organization says that they have 35 sponsored Seabins that are being launched in 25 different countries.

    The City of Cockburn recently became the first municipality in Western Australia to deploy a Seabin, and they say that the contraption has already proven to be very successful.

    “We realize the Seabin is not going to be the answer to all our marine debris problems, but it is a great local solution for this area,” the city’s waste education officer, Nicki Ledger, told ABC News. “We have such a healthy marina — we have bait fish, seahorses, green sea turtles, we get seals and dolphins coming in as well — so it’s just imperative that we keep a healthy environment for these animals so they keep coming in to visit.”

    If you would like to pre-order your own Seabin for your local marine life, you can visit The Seabin Project’s website.
    www.goodnewsnetwork.org/seabins-being-in...suck-up-ocean-trash/

    (Hey its a good start even if it only makes a small difference....kudos to this company and the big shots that use it)

    Attached Images Attached Images

    Goodbye April, hello May...queen of blossoms and fulfilling flowers.....

  2. #2
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    This is wonderful!!! I'm very afraid of all the plastics that are going into the ocean, microbeads- what in hall are they for, anyway?

    I'm going to look for a site that would deal with the CT shoreline (most of which is State parkland, but still..) and email this info to them.





    1512584_721833561168572_870140450_n.jpg

  3. #3
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    Those pics are worth a thousand words of exactly whats going on in our oceans and waterways RR
    Let us know what you find out....hopefully they're already using them if their budget allows....

    Goodbye April, hello May...queen of blossoms and fulfilling flowers.....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by PopsnTuff View Post
    Those pics are worth a thousand words of exactly whats going on in our oceans and waterways RR
    Let us know what you find out....hopefully they're already using them if their budget allows....
    I sent off the email to our State land & water dept. I will let you know if I hear anything.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by RadishRose View Post
    microbeads- what in hall are they for, anyway?
    From Wikipedia: "Microbeads are manufactured solid plastic particles of less than one millimeter in their largest dimension. They are most frequently made of polyethylene but can be of other petrochemical plastics such as polypropylene and polystyrene. They are used in exfoliating personal care products, toothpastes and in biomedical and health-science research"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy View Post
    From Wikipedia: "Microbeads are manufactured solid plastic particles of less than one millimeter in their largest dimension. They are most frequently made of polyethylene but can be of other petrochemical plastics such as polypropylene and polystyrene. They are used in exfoliating personal care products, toothpastes and in biomedical and health-science research"
    Thank you Tommy, I should have looked it up myself. Good lord, it's in everything, it's everywhere!

  7. #7
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  8. #8
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    Our oceans have been trash bins for thousands of years. I's a wonder that it isn't worse than it is.
    John

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon View Post
    Our oceans have been trash bins for thousands of years. I's a wonder that it isn't worse than it is.
    Yes Falcon, that's right. It is a wonder.

    Maybe because way back, the stuff was biodegradable; wood; clay pots, stoneware, fabrics, paper, food waste. Today, it's plastics and they don't go away for 4-5 hundred years-if ever. They're filling stomachs of birds and fish. We will ingest minuscule particles. Oil slicks,,, I think today another oil tanker sank in the ocean. Not to mention mercury.

  10. #10
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    I would Love to see a "deposit" placed on ALL plastic containers....especially Water Bottles....and the money not refunded used for some meaningful recycling programs. It's hard to go anywhere without seeing discarded water bottles littering the streets, etc. There is probably enough plastic trash on the planet already to supply the needs of everyone for at least a decade....IF it were recycled. I guess it's cheaper to keep making plastic, than it is to collect and recycle it, but eventually that junk is going to create some serious environmental problems all over the planet.
    Things get better with age....I'm approaching Magnificent.

  11. #11
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    March 18, 2019, 12:24 PM EDT
    By Ben Kesslen

    Whale in the Philippines dies with 88 pounds of plastic in stomach


    With millions of tons of plastic ending up in the world's oceans every year, it's not unusual for marine wildlife to ingest some of it.
    But a museum in the southern Philippines said it made a stomach-churning discovery on Saturday when a beaked whale measuring more than 15 feet long was found dead with 88 pounds of plastic still lodged inside of it. The creature was located off the coast of the Mabini Campostela Valley.


    "I was not prepared for the amount of plastic," Darrell Blatchley, president and founder of the D' Bone Collector Museum in Davao City, told NBC News in a statement.


    The plastic included 16 rice sacks, four banana plantation bags and multiple shopping bags. It was the most plastic ever found by the group inside of a whale, said the museum, a nongovernmental organization that retrieves dead animals and preserves them for educational purposes.
    The male Cuvier beaked whale died from ingesting plastic waste.Courtesy of D' Bone Collector Museum Inc."It was so bad the plastic was beginning calcification," Blatchley said of the process in which calcium builds up in the body and causes tissue to harden.
    After a necropsy, Blatchley said, the animal appeared to have died from emaciation and dehydration — with the plastic hindering its ability to eat or drink. The whale had also been vomiting blood before it died, he added.
    Images of the whale have gone viral worldwide, as more and more people are calling for bans on single-use plastic, often focusing on its effects on the ocean.
    An estimated 8.8 million tons of plastic spill into the ocean annually. In the Philippines, Blatchley said, it's particularly bad. Over the past 10 years, his group has recovered 57 dead whales and dolphins, many of which died from plastic ingestion.
    "The Philippines needs to change," Blatchley said, adding that he hopes the latest attention on the whale will shine a light on the effects of pollution before "nothing will be left."



    Ben Kesslen writes for NBC News.




    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/w...tomach-n984421

  12. #12
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    Wife and I have directly worked with environmental issues for 30+ years, primarily in recycling. We're still involved weekly. I won't write a treatise here. Just to say that once again, people are the cause of the problem and refuse, overwhelmingly, to fix it. Everyone should be using reusable bags at the grocery store (cloth or vinyl) --- around here, anecdotally, I see one in a hundred shoppers walk out of the grocery store with a reusable bag. "Everyone' is carrying multiple plastic bags, only a small percentage will be recycled. We even have cloth bags for fruit and veggies --- can store them in the cloth bags and food keeps better.
    Everyone should be recycling. Recycling leveled off some years ago at about 50%. It's less than that looking at plastic bags from stores and bottled drinks. People just refuse to separate their recyclables from trash. We only put out garbage every few months. We fill a bin with recyclables every week --- glass, plastic, paper, aluminum and 'tin' cans, cardboard. You can too.
    We're involved in recycling styrofoam which is a major problem. We're trying to get plastic bags banned in town.

    Anyway, just pass the word around to try to get people in a habit of not using plastic, even though it requires a bit of a thought process and a bit of inconvenience.
    Growing old is like being increasingly penalized for a crime you haven't committed.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by PopsnTuff View Post
    .....
    The device can collect up to 44 pounds (20 kilograms) of trash, including tiny plastic microbeads that are 2 millimeters small.

    Collectively, the contraptions are capable of salvaging half a ton of garbage every year – and because fish are discouraged from approaching the Seabin due to the sound of its water pump motor, it causes zero harm to marine life.



    Thanks for posting this. Just a nit. The seabin can suck up about 1.5 kg a day --- it has a 20kg 'catch bag' that has to be cleaned out. Of course, the real issue is the continued dumping of plastics in the ocean. Note that the catch bag has to be cleaned. Then what happens? It has to go to a dump. We've substituted one 'dump' for another. I'm all for these devices. Just saying that they clean water, but don't solve the whole issue.
    Growing old is like being increasingly penalized for a crime you haven't committed.

  14. #14
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    I commend you and your wife RT!

    There are people who have well water that's not potable, they are excepted and need bottled water.

    We cannot let our oceans and it's creatures die.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by retiredtraveler View Post
    [/SIZE]

    Thanks for posting this. Just a nit. The seabin can suck up about 1.5 kg a day --- it has a 20kg 'catch bag' that has to be cleaned out. Of course, the real issue is the continued dumping of plastics in the ocean. Note that the catch bag has to be cleaned. Then what happens? It has to go to a dump. We've substituted one 'dump' for another. I'm all for these devices. Just saying that they clean water, but don't solve the whole issue.
    True, but it's a start. Better to compress the plastic cleaned from this device to a very small cube or something like that and would have to be stored on land until alternatives to plastics can be found. I wish I knew more.

    I've always wondered if part of space exploration wasn't driven by the need to put our garbage someplace else; nuclear waste, kid's play-gyms, yogurt cups, milk bottles, diapers....well the list goes on.

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