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Do I need to apply for Medicare Part A if I'm still working

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    Question Do I need to apply for Medicare Part A if I'm still working

    Turning 65 this year, but will continue to work and use my employer health coverage.
    Question: Do I still need to apply for Medicare Part A, or can all Medicare wait until AFTER I retire?
    .... Hearing conflicting statements about this.

  2. #2
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    Oct 2016
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    There really is no danger is applying for Part A. Just don't pay for Part B.

    Rick

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenSky View Post
    There really is no danger is applying for Part A. Just don't pay for Part B.

    Rick
    Actually, what I mean is, I don't see why I should even apply for Medicare Part A. I know it's free -- as opposed to Part B, which is around $135 or so a month -- but my employer health coverage will remain my primary coverage. So why should I sign up for Medicare Part A at 65? Can't I wait to enroll in both AFTER, or just before, I retire?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kim7346 View Post
    Actually, what I mean is, I don't see why I should even apply for Medicare Part A. I know it's free -- as opposed to Part B, which is around $135 or so a month -- but my employer health coverage will remain my primary coverage. So why should I sign up for Medicare Part A at 65? Can't I wait to enroll in both AFTER, or just before, I retire?
    You can reject Part A (although I know of none of my clients that did this). Since you have no premium why not keep it? It's not exactly duplicate coverage since it can cover some of our potential out of pocket costs if you are hospitalized.

    Bottom line is don't overthink this. There is no downside that I know of to accept Part A.

    Rick

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenSky View Post
    You can reject Part A (although I know of none of my clients that did this). Since you have no premium why not keep it? It's not exactly duplicate coverage since it can cover some of our potential out of pocket costs if you are hospitalized.

    Bottom line is don't overthink this. There is no downside that I know of to accept Part A.

    Rick

    Downside is, if I apply for Medicare -- even Part A -- someone told me I won't be eligible to contribute to, or receive employer contributions to, an HSA with my employer coverage. That's why I'm thinking of holding off signing up for Part A until after I retire.


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kim7346 View Post

    Downside is, if I apply for Medicare -- even Part A -- someone told me I won't be eligible to contribute to, or receive employer contributions to, an HSA with my employer coverage. That's why I'm thinking of holding off signing up for Part A until after I retire.

    Thatís a much different reason. Yes, from my research Plan A will no longer allow you to contribute to an HSA.

    Allow me to change my answer!

    Rick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Minnesota
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    So, now I'm thinking I should just hold off on applying for Medicare altogether (even Part A) -- that is, until I retire and am off my employer's health coverage.

    I know there's a Special Enrollment period some people get, and I would qualify for that. But that's only for an eight-month period AFTER being off employer coverage (when I retire), right? That's when I can sign up for Medicare.

    So there would probably be a coverage gap of at least one month. …. That's what I don't like.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kim7346 View Post
    So, now I'm thinking I should just hold off on applying for Medicare altogether (even Part A) -- that is, until I retire and am off my employer's health coverage.

    I know there's a Special Enrollment period some people get, and I would qualify for that. But that's only for an eight-month period AFTER being off employer coverage (when I retire), right? That's when I can sign up for Medicare.

    So there would probably be a coverage gap of at least one month. …. That's what I don't like.
    Nope. You apply BEFORE losing employer coverage and there won't be a gap. The 8 month window is to apply for a Medicare supplement if you already have A/B along with employer coverage. This doesn't apply to you as you have a 6 month window after receiving A/B to apply for a supplement without underwriting. You will also have time to get your Part D (drug) plan.

    I don't know where you're located but you are welcome to contact me prior to retirement and I'll be glad to walk you through everything. In the meantime you should decline Part A.

    Rick

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