Alaska Airways Flight 66 Hits Bear While Landing At Yakutat Airport

FastTrax

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FastTrax

Senior Member
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Very sad. :( Surprised the runways aren't monitored better for live beings before a landing.

I feel your pain. Most international airports are completely fenced and/or strictly controlled. Oldman can elaborate further on this. I did a ride along with Orlando International Airport Airside Operations crews and they have shotguns with noise cartridges to scare birds off the taxiways. Quite an elaborate operation. Much more exciting then Landside Operations crews which mostly deals with passenger situations.
 

FastTrax

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I just love documentaries and non-fiction subjects. I first got into this when I was told by straight up Little Italy friends just how much of a farce TV shows and movies were in depicting the "REAL" world of the five families.
 

FastTrax

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I also subscribe to a number of news alert websites including IPN. I also stay in contact with independent news stringers and I listen to live stream Broadcastify and other media networks from radio-locator and check my dropbox every 24 hours. If you want I can send you a zip file if you PM me.
 

jerry old

redneck, but brainy
We have enough auto accidents in the lower 48, without chancing our plane running into bears, moose, mercy!

FastTrac is documentary fan-post #6
I am enthralled by the folks living in Siberia, the hardships. the struggle to survive and the hermits.

Have more to say, but shouldn't take thread south...
 
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FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
We have enough auto accidents in the lower 48, without chancing our plan running into bears, moose, mercy!

FastTrac is documentary fan-post #6
I am enthralled by the folks living in Siberia, the hardships. the struggle to survive and the hermits.

Have more to say, but shouldn't take thread south...

Jerry old you know me. You can take this thread North, East, South or West Just like every one of my threads I just started this thread but any and all members are more then welcome to contribute as they see fit. So have at it and have a hearty Turkey Day. I already ordered my feed from Cracker Barrel GOD forbid my new tenant should cook a Rock Cornish hen.
 

jerry old

redneck, but brainy
Scratching my head watching the 'Running of the Bulls' in Spain and Portugal-not that many fatalities-still...
It beats watching an American Documentary on folks like Ted Bundy-bring on the bulls!
 
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oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
I feel your pain. Most international airports are completely fenced and/or strictly controlled. Oldman can elaborate further on this. I did a ride along with Orlando International Airport Airside Operations crews and they have shotguns with noise cartridges to scare birds off the taxiways. Quite an elaborate operation. Much more exciting then Landside Operations crews which mostly deals with passenger situations.
Well, let me think. I have been retired for awhile now, so I have to recondition my brain from working in a grocery store back to aviation. You are correct. The airfield is lined with fencing to protect the taxiways and runways from many different things that may have ventured out onto it, including people, which has also happened.

Did you know that some of the vehicles that you see driving around on the tarmac have huge magnets under them to pick up any steel lying about that may have fallen off of a vehicle or plane? Most airports do have cameras, but if no one is monitoring the cameras, then it is possible for a big animal like a bear to walk through a weak fence and onto the runway/taxiway. For years, the FAA has considered making airports install sensors above the runways to protect it from outside sources. A few airports have been attempting to use it as a matter of functionality. Check it out. GTT I am not real familiar with these systems. They were being used in trials mostly when I retired.

This brings to mind the accident with the piece of metal that fell off a Continental Airline's plane taking off in France and then it laid on the runway for the Concorde to run over causing its tires to explode and when the pilots retracted the landing gear back up into the belly, it caused the plane to catch on fire. Terrible, terrible day for aviation. From time to time when you are in the airport and looking out at the planes landing and taking off, you may see a pickup truck or car going up and down the runways. They are checking for debris on the runway.

Personally, I have seen debris on the runway and reported it to the ATC in the tower. When that happens, they stop all traffic using that runway and have it swept.

You seldom hear of runway incursions with animals. The noise seems to keep them at bay. If anyone has ever heard a jet that has landed and then hear the reverse thrusters activated, it would definitely scare anyone, or any animal to get off the runway. Especially, like the old
B-747's with their four engines.

I love aviation and miss it more than anyone will ever know.

Again, sorry for the long post. Now aren't you sorry you asked?
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
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Well, let me think. I have been retired for awhile now, so I have to recondition my brain from working in a grocery store back to aviation. You are correct. The airfield is lined with fencing to protect the taxiways and runways from many different things that may have ventured out onto it, including people, which has also happened.

Did you know that some of the vehicles that you see driving around on the tarmac have huge magnets under them to pick up any steel lying about that may have fallen off of a vehicle or plane? Most airports do have cameras, but if no one is monitoring the cameras, then it is possible for a big animal like a bear to walk through a weak fence and onto the runway/taxiway. For years, the FAA has considered making airports install sensors above the runways to protect it from outside sources. A few airports have been attempting to use it as a matter of functionality. Check it out. GTT I am not real familiar with these systems. They were being used in trials mostly when I retired.

This brings to mind the accident with the piece of metal that fell off a Continental Airline's plane taking off in France and then it laid on the runway for the Concorde to run over causing its tires to explode and when the pilots retracted the landing gear back up into the belly, it caused the plane to catch on fire. Terrible, terrible day for aviation. From time to time when you are in the airport and looking out at the planes landing and taking off, you may see a pickup truck or car going up and down the runways. They are checking for debris on the runway.

Personally, I have seen debris on the runway and reported it to the ATC in the tower. When that happens, they stop all traffic using that runway and have it swept.

You seldom hear of runway incursions with animals. The noise seems to keep them at bay. If anyone has ever heard a jet that has landed and then hear the reverse thrusters activated, it would definitely scare anyone, or any animal to get off the runway. Especially, like the old
B-747's with their four engines.

I love aviation and miss it more than anyone will ever know.

Again, sorry for the long post. Now aren't you sorry you asked?

Sorry I asked? Absolutely not. I believe on an earlier thread about "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" I said I didn't even know planes had radios until the Indianapolis ARTCC scene. Now that with all the railroads in Florida using like only 10 frequencies out of the 97 VHF AAR/FCC allocated channel plan with lineside transmitters spaced 25 miles apart I can only receive SunRail a/k/a rumored to be central Florida's 5 day a week limited service plastic commuter train with aluminum wheels and inward facing cameras not to mention the operating department personnel have to wear uniforms like the Japanese railway crews, AMTRAK Autotrain op's in Sanford and CSX runs 90% of their trains at night. 118 MHz to 136.975 Mhz VHF aviation is fascinating especially the airline company and FBO frequencies (122.825 MHz, 122.875 MHz, 128.825 MHz to 132. MHz and 136.5 MHz to 136.975 Mhz. I listen to JAX and MIA ARTCC's at night when the TRACON's slow up and the night shift crews in the towers are snoozing. Those magnets are for what Airside ops call's FOD. You know what that is. Couldn't they just call it metal crap that falls off the planes? I mean seriously. Anyway I tried to monitor 225. MHz to 380. MHz UHF milcom (380.125 MHz to 399.975 MHz was reallocated to ISP and base operations in FM mode plus that channel plan has over 7,000 frequencies and they believe in brevity. Now I am monitoring Stratcom EAM's 24/7/365 on hf 11175 khz and 8992 khz respectively. They have two others for night and two for days. Only thing is it's all coded and after a while just listening to Offut and Andrews drone on and on you wouldn't know training from the real thing. I was on LiveATC forums last night yakking about my bear post and another guy said he heard that a jet hit a fish while descending which everybody said yeah right until another member said he heard about that to and that the tower saw an eagle fly near the plane and it probably got frightened and dropped the fish. Still sounds like a fish story to me but I'll check it out tomorrow. Sometimes these I lost the big marlin hypes are true. So now I bet you're sorry for asking if I was sorry for asking. READBACK......................
 

FastTrax

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WOW I just now noticed the GTT thing. That must cost a fortune and of course the airports aviation authority will stick the cost to the airlines which in turn they'll jack up the fares. Can't win for losing.
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
FastTrax---You know more about radios and frequencies than I do. I know aviation radios and how to communicate over them and using other communications onboard, but when it comes to trains and others, I'm lost.

I see that you listen to live communications between planes and the controllers and I do also.
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
On one of my flights into Denver, we had just started our takeoff roll for departure when I heard a loud "BOOM!" I looked over at the F/O and asked him what was that noise. He said it was a bird cannon. I was preparing to abort the takeoff.

A lot of birds fly around Stapleton Airport, depending on what time of the year it is. That was the very first bird cannon that I had heard while flying. I had heard them in a simulator, but they sound much different.
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
FastTrax---You know more about radios and frequencies than I do. I know aviation radios and how to communicate over them and using other communications onboard, but when it comes to trains and others, I'm lost.

I see that you listen to live communications between planes and the controllers and I do also.

Cool, when the Turkey Day dust settles down we need to commiserate about our listening shacks. Have you dabbled in SDR yet?
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
Cool, when the Turkey Day dust settles down we need to commiserate about our listening shacks. Have you dabbled in SDR yet?
Planes use a different type of band for radar tracking, but some airport towers use more advanced bands along with ADS. Airports are dependent upon funds they receive from the owners of the airport, which is normally the city, so they use the money for other things in their budget, instead of updating the airport, unless the FAA mandates they comply.

Airplanes are also equipped with transponders, which are used for various communications, including when pilots send squawk codes.
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
Planes use a different type of band for radar tracking, but some airport towers use more advanced bands along with ADS. Airports are dependent upon funds they receive from the owners of the airport, which is normally the city, so they use the money for other things in their budget, instead of updating the airport, unless the FAA mandates they comply.

Airplanes are also equipped with transponders, which are used for various communications, including when pilots send squawk codes.
Yes OM I'm sure you know that the aviation industry pretty much uses the entire RF spectrum. I never got into ADS tracking or anything other then VHF, UHF voice and HF Oceanic comm's with air checks and squawk code assignments. There are some websites that actually decode ACARS-B but that's just informational I think. Can we commiserate when Turkey Day is over? If not I can understand but I can learn so much from you. I mean the real insider deal not the yak yak hype from the virtual pilot wannabes on the aviation forums. I am watching MCO on FlightAware and the skies are very busy. Well it's turkey sandwiches for the next thirty days.
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
Today's aircraft uses radio waves to perform several tasks. Here are a few: ACARS, TCAS, METAR, GPS, ILS, and RNAV (each has their own operating frequency). Radios normally stay between 118.00-137.00 frequency, but are able to go down to 108.00. Pilots also send squawk codes using radio waves via a transponder. And, of course, the auto pilot.

I would agree that planes do use a wide range of radio frequencies.

In addition to all of that, planes have been bouncing signals and data off of satellites for years using data links. I believe as far back as the '70's and maybe even farther.
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
People used to ask me how did I understand ATC because they talk so fast and use a lot of language or letters that make no sense. I would tell them that, first, we had to learn what those letters of the alphabet meant. Like A=Alpha, B=Bravo, C=Charlie, D=Delta and so on. It's the foreign pilots that the ATC’s that would have issues from time to time.

Some of the foreign pilots had very hard accents or dialects.

Here is some fun stuff.

 

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