Bread ingredients

Grampa Don

Yep, that's me
I was eating a piece of toast, and thought "you know, somehow this doesn't taste right." So, I looked at the ingredients. It was Sara Lee white with whole grains.

I wonder how they come up with such a recipe. Does someone say "this is pretty good but it could use some potassium iodate or a little Cellulose fiber"? Cellulose fiber? Isn't that sawdust? When I make bread it's flour, yeast, salt, water, and a little sugar to start the yeast. It's not as soft and spongy as Sara Lee, but it tastes like bread.

When I was a kid, my Mom bought Langendorf white bread. It was white and soft, but still tasted good. I wonder what was in it.

Don
 

Aunt Bea

Well-known Member
Location
Near Mount Pilot
The low carb bread that I've been eating lists the first ingredient as water and costs almost three times what a loaf of plain old supermarket bread usually costs. The addition of bamboo fiber also makes me smile!

Ingredients: WATER, MODIFIED WHEAT STARCH, ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMIN MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WHEAT GLUTEN, SUGAR, BAMBOO FIBER, YEAST, CONTAINS 2% OR LESS OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING: SOYBEAN OIL, SALT, CALCIUM SULFATE, MONOGLYCERIDES, CALCIUM PROPIONATE ...



Sometimes I think about how hard my grandparents worked to put as many calories on the table as possible to feed their family and today I work just as hard to put as few calories on the table as possible.
 

treeguy64

Hari Om, y'all!
Location
Austin, TX.
My bread, which I throw on my cast iron skillet, contains: Low-gluten Spelt flour, baking powder, olive oil, egg replacer, water. That's it! It's pita bread, my way. I do press the slices in my tortilladora before they hit the skillet.
 

Grampa Don

Yep, that's me
Original Poster
It seems to specify that calcium propionate and sorbic acid are preservatives. Datem is a dough conditioner. I don't know why they add that other stuff.

Don
 

oldal

Member
Location
California, USA
The bread I like the most is Dave's Killer White Bread Done Right
INGREDIENTS:
Organic wheat flour, water, organic grain blend (organic barley flour, organic rye flour, organic spelt flour (wheat), organic millet flour, organic quinoa flour), organic whole wheat flour, organic cane sugar, organic cracked whole wheat, organic expeller pressed canola oil, organic potato flour, contains 2% or less of each of the following: sea salt, yeast, organic wheat gluten, organic cultured wheat flour, organic vinegar, organic acerola powder, enzymes.
 

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
I'd never heard of Datem either, so I looked it up...


It's considered safe in the US at up to 45 parts per million, but is banned from use in Europe because studies showed it could cause asthma or allergic reactions. DATEM – an acronym for Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides.
 

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
Hollydolly -- It looks pretty healthy. The asterisk comment at the bottom kind of surprises me. Does the U.K. have any guidelines?

Don
I hadn't noticed the asterisk until you pointed it out, how very odd... :unsure:..our bread is made by allied bakeries..to regulations laid down by our FSA
The Food Standards Agency (FSA) is responsible for food safety and food hygiene in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. It works with local authorities to enforce food safety regulations and its staff work in meat plants to check the standards are being met.

 

Camper6

Well-known Member
I was eating a piece of toast, and thought "you know, somehow this doesn't taste right." So, I looked at the ingredients. It was Sara Lee white with whole grains.

I wonder how they come up with such a recipe. Does someone say "this is pretty good but it could use some potassium iodate or a little Cellulose fiber"? Cellulose fiber? Isn't that sawdust? When I make bread it's flour, yeast, salt, water, and a little sugar to start the yeast. It's not as soft and spongy as Sara Lee, but it tastes like bread.

When I was a kid, my Mom bought Langendorf white bread. It was white and soft, but still tasted good. I wonder what was in it.

Don
What you are reading is preservatives. Enriched . It would get hard before it gets mouldy. Your homemade bread gets stale quickly.
 

Kaila

Senior Member
It would get hard before it gets mouldy.
That is interesting. That's what it does?
I don't get those types of bread, so I am not familiar with what happens to them, and what doesn't.
I have trouble with yeast, so I get much simpler recipe bread that stays in the freezer, or simple baked items with few ingredients, which I also keep in freezer till close to use. I miss the yeast breads sometimes, but do better without them, myself. Homemade yeast breads used to taste great, years ago.
 

Grampa Don

Yep, that's me
Original Poster
What you are reading is preservatives. Enriched . It would get hard before it gets mouldy. Your homemade bread gets stale quickly.
Even my flour has additives. It's labeled as enriched.

Ingredients
Bleached Wheat Flour, Niacin, Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Enzyme.

When I bake bread, it usually doesn't last long enough to go very stale.

Don
 

Catlady

Senior Member
Location
Southern AZ
I like to make homemade bread. Since it's only me and I'm trying to lose weight, I wait until it cools off, cut into slices, slip into a plastic bag, and put in freezer, then take one slice out as needed. I'm sure the flour has additives, but it's much LESS than in a loaf of purchased bread.
 

Catlady

Senior Member
Location
Southern AZ
I'm always looking for bread recipes in small amounts. One small loaf or 6 buns. Love the smell. Yeast bread is like magic.
This is not a bread recipe, but I thought I would share, it sounds delicious. And I'm Italian and the grandma brought recipe from Italy, sooooo . . .

 

Camper6

Well-known Member
This is not a bread recipe, but I thought I would share, it sounds delicious. And I'm Italian and the grandma brought recipe from Italy, sooooo . . .

Copied it over. Will cut the recipe in half. Should be good.
 

lukebass

New Member
Location
Tennessee
I make my own bread. Ingredients; organic bread flour, sugar, salt, yeast, water, and a little olive oil.

Not too long ago it took a full day to make a loaf of bread. Today modern bread bakeries go from flour to a finished loaf in about three hours.
The problem with modern bread is not the gluten but the additives. Secondly, modern day wheat harvesting methods uses glyphosate to kill the wheat and then harvest. This applies to most of the wheat except organic wheat.
The yeast is no longer given time to break down the wheat. The additives speed up the process and increase shelf life. Worst of all is that most commercial bread has glyphosate in it. It's not the gluten.
 

Grampa Don

Yep, that's me
Original Poster
Secondly, modern day wheat harvesting methods uses glyphosate to kill the wheat and then harvest. This applies to most of the wheat except organic wheat.
That might be an exaggeration. According to this article and others I found, it's used in that manner on less than 3% of wheat acreage, mostly in North and South Dakota and Canada. And, there seems to be little evidence that there is enough left in the wheat to be toxic. Am I missing something?

Don
 

lukebass

New Member
Location
Tennessee
Don,
Actually it is much worse that you think. Not only is glyphosate in wheat but also oats and many other grains. I suggest you listen to Dr. Stephanie Seneff, Phd. You can find many of her lectures and interviews on youtube.

 

Grampa Don

Yep, that's me
Original Poster
According to Snopes, Dr. Seneff is a crackpot. Her claims have no scientific data to support them. She is also apparently an anti-vaxxer. Her PhD is in computer science. You can read a little more about her glyphosate paper here. It's pseudoscience, which I have a great distaste for.

I agree that there is too much junk in much of our food, and some of it may have bad long term effects. But, we should be evaluating it based on hard data, not assumptions. Has anybody actually analyzed harvested wheat to see if it contains glyphosate?

Don
 

lukebass

New Member
Location
Tennessee
Don,
I wrote this post to alert people to the dangers of glyphosate. What you do with the information is up to you. If you so desire investigate further you are welcome to do so. I suggest you look into the recently won lawsuits against Monsanto and Roundup.
I choose to avoid glyphosate, but what the heck, you are free to eat and drink all the glyphosate you want.

Here's a short video that show a Monsanto lobbyist offered glyphosate:

 


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