Can you Millennials work this?

CatGuy

New Member
Location
St. Louis, MO
A fellow called a repairman because his TV was acting up. Repairman came in, thumped it once in the back, worked fine. Homeowner said, "No charge for just whacking it, right?" "No charge for whacking it," the repairman said. "Fifty bucks for knowing where to whack it."
 

Devi

Member
Location
WA USA
One term: rabbit ears. LOL!

What fuzzybuddy said. That poor TV up there ... no remote!

The thing that is not often made clear is that we seniors grew up and along with new and updated technology -- sometimes constantly updating technology. (Remember Windows 95?!!) I think we got our first computer in 1984. It's not as if we never heard of anything and then -presto!- at our age, here's new technology we don't know how to work with. That is, many or most of us are not starting from scratch.

Of course, I should speak for myself ... I always had a great affinity for computers. Not everyone has that.
 

Ken N Tx

MALE
Location
Texas
 

Judycat

Senior Member
Location
Pennsylvania
My dad put two antennas on poles out in the yard. One was for Johnstown's station and the other for picking up Pittsburgh's stations. He had a switch inside we could flip back and forth. When the wind blew hard during the night he'd send us out the next day to turn them by hand until the picture was back to normal.
 

Pecos

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
My dad put two antennas on poles out in the yard. One was for Johnstown's station and the other for picking up Pittsburgh's stations. He had a switch inside we could flip back and forth. When the wind blew hard during the night he'd send us out the next day to turn them by hand until the picture was back to normal.
Your Dad knew what he was doing. I was an electronics technician in the Navy during that time period and had a number of part time jobs as a TV repairman.
 

Judycat

Senior Member
Location
Pennsylvania
Your Dad knew what he was doing. I was an electronics technician in the Navy during that time period and had a number of part time jobs as a TV repairman.
My dad was a coal miner for 45 years, but he was pretty handy with tools and had a knack for figuring out how things work. My oldest son has the same talent.
 

Camper6

Well-known Member
My dad put two antennas on poles out in the yard. One was for Johnstown's station and the other for picking up Pittsburgh's stations. He had a switch inside we could flip back and forth. When the wind blew hard during the night he'd send us out the next day to turn them by hand until the picture was back to normal.
That same technology would work now if you don't want cable.
 

fmdog44

Well-known Member
Location
Houston, Texas
In Houston in order to get a satellite signal your dish must face south. Wouldn't you think by now Directtv would come up with a more universal signal that could be picked up regardless of where the dish faces?
 

jerry old

redneck, but brainy
In the 1980's people could purchase huge satellite dishes
10 feet or so in diameter.

I was told, don't actually know, that they could bring in any
satellite program, or any information broadcast by a satellite.

Anyone have factual information on these giant dishes, I noted a lot of residents in rural retirement areas (high dollar folk) has these giant dishes.
 

Pecos

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
In the 1980's people could purchase huge satellite dishes
10 feet or so in diameter.

I was told, don't actually know, that they could bring in any
satellite program, or any information broadcast by a satellite.

Anyone have factual information on these giant dishes, I noted a lot of residents in rural retirement areas (high dollar folk) has these giant dishes.
Those big antennas had a very narrow beam and a very high gain. In those days the signal modulation mode was significantly different than it is today and fairly simple receiver systems were able to demodulate (process) the signal and pull out the original program. These days, the modulation mode is significantly different and requires more sophisticated receiver/demodulation equipment to extract the original programs. These new modulation modes have a higher signal demodulation processing gain and hence the requirement for super high gain antennas has been reduced.

The new dishes still have to be pointed at the satellite.
 

Pecos

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
In Houston in order to get a satellite signal your dish must face south. Wouldn't you think by now Directtv would come up with a more universal signal that could be picked up regardless of where the dish faces?

These dish antennas have to be pointed at the antenna in order to capitalize on their gain and pick up a fairly weak signal. Any transmitted signal strong enough to be picked up regardless of where the dish faces would require lots of power; far more power than those satellites have. That power level would also create a lot of electromagnetic interference with other systems.
 

Camper6

Well-known Member
In the 1980's people could purchase huge satellite dishes
10 feet or so in diameter.

I was told, don't actually know, that they could bring in any
satellite program, or any information broadcast by a satellite.

Anyone have factual information on these giant dishes, I noted a lot of residents in rural retirement areas (high dollar folk) has these giant dishes.
They could only bring in the satellite they were aimed at. They were huge because the signal was weak compared to now. The newer satellites have a stronger signal and that's why you can use a smaller dish. You also need a receiver to decode the signal and send it to the T.V. set. Aiming the dish is not an easy task. It has to be spot on. And the satellite people keep changing the code and cards in the receiver to prevent piracy. You rarely see the large dishes anymore because even the satellite itself has a limited life. A new satellite gets introduced and you have to aim at the new position.
The giant dishes are also used for communal purposes in areas like retirement communities . The signal is sent to individuals by cable.
 

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