Climate

Cameron

Member
Location
Ontario, Canada
A short article by Kurt Cobb on the heat wave out west and why this type of event is likely to become the norm.
http://resourceinsights.blogspot.com/2021/07/climate-change-consequences-too-hot-too.html

Reading up on how the romans and ancient egyptians handled heat. The latter with damp mats at the entrance to a home and the dry arid wind would blow over it cooling a bit. The romans (rich anyways) had water from the aqueducts flow through pipes in the walls to lower house temperatures. both used terra cotta pots which are porous to cool an area. (at least based on my small research !)
 

Paco Dennis

Senior Member
Location
Mid-Missouri
Severe heat waves have caused catastrophic crop failures, thousands of deaths from hyperthermia, and widespread power outages due to increased use of air conditioning. A heat wave is considered extreme weather that can be a natural disaster, and a danger because heat and sunlight may overheat the human body.
 

Ruby Rose

Location: Canadian Prairies
Severe heat waves have caused catastrophic crop failures, thousands of deaths from hyperthermia, and widespread power outages due to increased use of air conditioning. A heat wave is considered extreme weather that can be a natural disaster, and a danger because heat and sunlight may overheat the human body.
Scary but so true as we are in the midst of a lengthy heat wave...drought conditions...air conditioning going 'nuts' and myself being dizzy as a bat if I linger outdoors. I am not overly keen on perpetual air conditioning as so un-natural thus tend to step out to warm myself up. Weird, I know...so I am told.
 

Don M.

Well-known Member
Location
central Missouri

JonDouglas

Senior Member
Location
New England
Since few, if any, of us here remember the heat/drought/dust bowl conditions and associated great depression of the 1930s, it serves as a reminder that that these things happen from time to time. As for excessive rainfall and flooding, I can remember that happening back in the midwest in the 1950s, once flooding the entire town I lived in. Floodplains were given the name because flooding happens as a natural event that is beneficial to the land, if not those living in it.
 

Cameron

Member
Location
Ontario, Canada
interesting. Will read it more thoroughly later with another cup of coffee. I have read some studies that grass farming promotes a type of bacteria the proliferates and consumes carbon. Definitely not around with heavy fertilizer which kills it off.

part of all this is likely to cloud cover. I read somewhere that in the past excess cloud cover exacerbated extremes and just see this article came out on that https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210719153522.htm
 


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