Covid Vaccines to 12-15 year olds - What are your thoughts?

Kids may not be as vulnerable to the plague as adults (especially seniors) are. But they can still carry the illness with them and infect the more vulnerable. Thus, better for them to be immunized so that they cannot infect anyone else.

Now let us hope young children from ages 2-11 will also be immunized soon so that all will be protected. After all, you never know when a variant that only affects kids may manifest itself. What a dreadful thought that would be.
 

Ladybj

Senior Member
Kids may not be as vulnerable to the plague as adults (especially seniors) are. But they can still carry the illness with them and infect the more vulnerable. Thus, better for them to be immunized so that they cannot infect anyone else.

Now let us hope young children from ages 2-11 will also be immunized soon so that all will be protected. After all, you never know when a variant that only affects kids may manifest itself. What a dreadful thought that would be.
If the vaccine was FDA approved as oppose to EUA - I would slightly agree. I could not see my 2 yr. old getting a EUA vaccine with soo many unanswered questions...jmo.
 
unanswered questions


I consider that to be healthy skepticism. Because this view is so prevalent, it can only force the government to compel pharmaceutical companies to produce manifest evidence that its remedies work. Ultimately, that's what we all want. So yes, go ahead and tell the government to answer any and ALL questions. Our world can only get healthier for doing so.
 

JonDouglas

Senior Member
Location
New England
I thank God my daughter is 28 yrs old and able to make her own decisions. The majority of youths in that age group immune systems are good...why take a chance on comprising their immune system...jmo.
I posted this on another thread but it may be relevant here: Researchers warn that Pfizer vaccine induces complex reprogramming of innate immune responses. From news-medical.net: The key takeawy from this article may be the following:

. . . . . . little is known about the broad effects the vaccine may have on the innate and adaptive immune responses.
 

Aunt Bea

SF VIP
Location
Near Mount Pilot
IMO a 12 year old is capable of making an informed decision.

This is just one of many decisions/choices that a young person will have to make about their bodies, beliefs, safety, etc...

I would support it and explain it but the ultimate decision should be left to the child.
 
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Ladybj

Senior Member
IMO a 12 year old is capable of making an informed decision.

This is just one of many decisions/choices that a young person will have to make about their bodies, beliefs, safety, etc...

I would support it and explain it but the ultimate decision should be left to the child.
Something as serious as getting a vaccine shot, I strongly feel they are not capable of making that decision on their own. Some adults were not properly informed of the possible side effects because no one knew. I know of a few adults that went back and forth as to whether to get it or not and a few wish they had not. My hubby got the vax and has had a nagging cough ever since. I ask him was it allergies he said, I don't know. At some point, he may need to get it checked out. Again, we all do what is best for us. The C-19 has not stopped my standard of living. My faith in the medical World/Science is not the greatest due to personal reasons.
 
There are no assurances in life. It may mean that to save millions in a pandemic, thousands could die from complications of the vaccine. We don't have the option of waiting decades, while we develop a vaccine without any complications, and even then, some will die from it. I doubt that the average citizen has the necessary knowledge and understanding to adequately judge the effectiveness and complications of a vaccine, regardless of the information, or misinformation, and paranoia on social media. Is there risk in getting the vaccine? Yes. Just as there's risk in not getting it. We have developed vaccines from all over the world, which have proved effective for covid 19., and millions have gotten the vaccines, and millions are still alive and well.
 

JonDouglas

Senior Member
Location
New England
I am thinking it may be a little early to declare that these vaccines are safe, successful and without long-term issues. On the subject of vaccinating children, someone reminded me that mRNA was a very new technique and he didn't want to see "rug rats become lab rats". It's something to think about. Weighing necessity/risk/benefit is always a good idea.
 
I thought that being vaccinated only helped prevent or lessen the severity of the disease and the symptoms, not prevent its transmission. Is this a case of a vaccinated person is less likely to get it therefore, less able to infect someone else?
 


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