Do good players become good coaches?

hypochondriac

Well-known member
Location
Australia
Id say generally no but sometimes it happens.
There are so many stories of great coaches who were mediocre players .
Different skill set. Communication a key for coaches.
And some of us were mediocre players and just awful coaches! ☺
 

hypochondriac

Well-known member
Location
Australia
Original Poster
and by the way
have many of you ever coached kids teams? i hated my stint. it was painful to say the least.
 

911

Well-known member
Location
USA
I would say mostly no at the professional level, especially baseball. Billy Martin, Earl Weaver, Sparky Anderson and Terry Francona all come to mind as being so-so baseball players, but outstanding managers.

Football is also like baseball, but I think the NBA might be different.
 
For two of the years that my oldest son wrestled Steve combs who was on the 1968 US Olympic team coached his High School wrestling team. During that time the team never had a winning season. He just wasn't that good with beginners. He had trouble bringing it down to their level.
My theory on this is that people with a great deal of natural athletic talent just don't understand that less gifted individuals are not going to catch on as quickly and easily as they did.


 

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MarkinPhx

Well-known member
Location
Phoenix
Larry Bird first popped in my mind as the only NBA great who became a decent coach. I can't think of many others except maybe for Bill Russell. Same with the NFL and MLB. Phoenix is probably the only place in the world where Wayne Gretsky is not welcomed because of his horrible coaching stint here. It's got to be tough to be so great in your field and not being able to expect the same from others with less talent.
 

charry

Well-known member
Location
UK
my hubby , played for the Arsenal Youth team, .......... and he also coached the under 12s ....he hated it,...... all the fathers fighting with one another, and often he was left having to take home 10 kids , all piled in his car, when the parents couldnt be bothered to pick them up !!... 🥴⚽
 

hypochondriac

Well-known member
Location
Australia
Original Poster
my hubby , played for the Arsenal Youth team, .......... and he also coached the under 12s ....he hated it,...... all the fathers fighting with one another, and often he was left having to take home 10 kids , all piled in his car, when the parents couldnt be bothered to pick them up !!... 🥴⚽
I got a small taste of coaching. enough to know i wasnt cut out for it. you gotta ooze confidence and have very strict boundaries. especially with parents. kids are usually better than the parents.
 

911

Well-known member
Location
USA
Larry Bird first popped in my mind as the only NBA great who became a decent coach. I can't think of many others except maybe for Bill Russell. Same with the NFL and MLB. Phoenix is probably the only place in the world where Wayne Gretsky is not welcomed because of his horrible coaching stint here. It's got to be tough to be so great in your field and not being able to expect the same from others with less talent.
I would add Lenny Wilkins to the list. He seemed to be a winner for many of the teams that he coached. Carl Malone?
 

oldman

Well-known member
Location
PA
Actually, Jimmy Valvano was only an average college basketball player at Rutgers, but later became a great basketball coach and human being at North Carolina State. Jimmy led his team to the national title in 1983.

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WhatInThe

Well-known member
For two of the years that my oldest son wrestled Steve combs who was on the 1968 US Olympic team coached his High School wrestling team. During that time the team never had a winning season. He just wasn't that good with beginners. He had trouble bringing it down to their level.
My theory on this is that people with a great deal of natural athletic talent just don't understand that less gifted individuals are not going to catch on as quickly and easily as they did.


Exactly. Raw natural talent doesn't necessarily lead to teaching/coaching ability. That's why many mediocre players make better/good coaches because they had to learn, think and work harder at the sport than the raw talent athlete.

By the same token the naturally talented must develop a work ethic for a long and productive career. That's the difference between a professional and raw talent.
 


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