Do You Feel You Are Free?

dseag2

Dallas, TX
Location
Dallas, TX
That is a great attitude! One can't go around feeling afraid all of the time. I am not gay, but I am in an interracial marriage. It is amazing how many people stare at us when we are out and about. I remind myself that there was a time in history when we would not have been even allowed to marry. I saw the movie about the Lovings, who were persecuted because they married. So I am glad that you feel safe to be who you are, where you are!
So, you definitely understand.

I can't believe people even stare at you and your husband anymore. I see so many interracial couples here in Dallas. One of the nicest houses in our neighborhood is owned by an interracial couple. They are young. He is black and she is white and they have a young child. Everyone in our little circle of friends (straight and gay) loves them.

Anyway, a therapist once told me almost 20 years ago that I was constantly fearful of someone challenging me because I was gay and the chances that would happen were very slim. He was spot on!
 

Packerjohn

Packerjohn
Location
Canada
Nope! I don't feel free. The government is watching me all the time. Those bloody cameras on every street and every store. Every time I go on the computer Google is trying to spy on me. All the credit card companies are watching us. Amazon is following our every purchase. We live in a dictatorship but the sheep living in it don't know it.
 

StillLearning

Member
Location
Minnesota
That is a great attitude! One can't go around feeling afraid all of the time. I am not gay, but I am in an interracial marriage. It is amazing how many people stare at us when we are out and about. I remind myself that there was a time in history when we would not have been even allowed to marry. I saw the movie about the Lovings, who were persecuted because they married. So I am glad that you feel safe to be who you are, where you are!
My husband and I have been married 45 years. He’s Filipino and I’m white. We’ve had our share of difficulties because of our interracial marriage. Neither of us realized what we were in for when we were so young. Yes things are a whole lot better now. But my daughter just mentioned that her Filipino husband and her would like to move out of the city into the rural areas but was concerned about their 2 little girls. Free? For some but not all.
 
Location
Eastern PA
My husband and I have been married 45 years. He’s Filipino and I’m white. We’ve had our share of difficulties because of our interracial marriage. Neither of us realized what we were in for when we were so young. Yes things are a whole lot better now. But my daughter just mentioned that her Filipino husband and her would like to move out of the city into the rural areas but was concerned about their 2 little girls. Free? For some but not all.
A few years ago we were considering moving into a rural area, but while driving around we got stared at so much that we decided to remain in the city.
 

Sunny

SF VIP
Location
Maryland
Years ago, I was taking a graduate course about Africa at NYU. A fellow in my class from Kenya and I always walked together a few blocks to the subway when the class was over. I am White, he was Black. I will never forget the stares we got, and we were just walking down the street, chatting! (I was married, and there was nothing between us other than being classmates.) But those stares left an indelible impression on me. I can only imagine how difficult it must be for those in an interracial marriage, or relationship.
 

dseag2

Dallas, TX
Location
Dallas, TX
My husband and I have been married 45 years. He’s Filipino and I’m white. We’ve had our share of difficulties because of our interracial marriage. Neither of us realized what we were in for when we were so young. Yes things are a whole lot better now. But my daughter just mentioned that her Filipino husband and her would like to move out of the city into the rural areas but was concerned about their 2 little girls. Free? For some but not all.
@StillLearning my partner of 30 years is also Filipino. We lived in South Florida for years without incident. When we were looking to move to Charlotte in 2001, he was concerned about fitting in. I now understand the implications. We ultimately moved to Dallas and have had no issues. Most here just think he is Hispanic.
 

Don M.

SF VIP
Location
central Missouri
Living in a nice rural area makes me feel "free". Watching the news, and all the problems people living in the crowded cities face, I feel grateful that we have no such problems here....no crime, no lunatics killing people, etc., etc. If I'm working outdoors, and the bladder knocks on the door, I can stop and take care of business without "offending" someone. Whenever we go somewhere, it's almost a relief to return to this peace and quiet.
 

Brookswood

Member
In regards to inter-racial couples, all I can say is that I see a lot of them today, among my own generation and much more in my children's and grand-children's generation. I suspect than in 20 years this issue will disappear as an issue. It's already disappearing in the younger generations.
 
Location
Eastern PA
In regards to inter-racial couples, all I can say is that I see a lot of them today, among my own generation and much more in my children's and grand-children's generation. I suspect than in 20 years this issue will disappear as an issue. It's already disappearing in the younger generations.
I've noticed a lot more inter-racial couples, too. It is a relief not to "stick out" in a crowd as much as before.
 

Packerjohn

Packerjohn
Location
Canada
I'm Canadian, and yes I am free.

Yes, Canadians are free! No army hoodlums knocking on your door at midnight and taking you away so your family never hears from you again.

On the other hand, during those "glorious" Covid 19 days, the province of Manitoba had 3,200 "enforcers" to make sure everyone wore their masks in public. Folks who refused the "jab" were not allowed to travel nor use public transport. Now, that is freedom?
 

Patricia

Member
@Remy, I actually think it might be better for you to stick it out there a bit longer. Just my opinion based on research, but I think in a couple of years the hot housing market will cool down. And since you don't own a home there isn't an urgency for you to sell to make a profit.

Right now, there are very few houses available. One reason has been low interest rates on mortgages, which are now increasing. Another is a shortage of housing. Not only are inexpensive houses not being built, major corporations are buying up entire neighborhoods and renting them out at criminal prices so first-time buyers are locked out of the market. A third reason is the rise in the cost of building materials due to supply chain issues and inflation. These should all moderate at some point.

We moved to TX 16 years ago because real estate prices were so low, but now they are through the roof. (We have lots of Californians moving here!) I'm pretty certain this bubble is going to burst and you will be in a better financial situation when it does. Even if interest rates are higher, that could be offset by lower real estate prices.
A relative said the houses in her neighborhood have been turned into rental properties, due to purchases by major corporations.
 

mrstime

Senior Member
Location
BC,Canada
Yes, Canadians are free! No army hoodlums knocking on your door at midnight and taking you away so your family never hears from you again.

On the other hand, during those "glorious" Covid 19 days, the province of Manitoba had 3,200 "enforcers" to make sure everyone wore their masks in public. Folks who refused the "jab" were not allowed to travel nor use public transport. Now, that is freedom?
I don't live in Manitoba. Keep in mind that "refusing the jab" was stupid, so the stupid don't deserve much. Those refusing the vaccine want the freedom, to infect everyone they come in contact if they had Covid 19. Remember they could pass the virus on even if they weren't sick! Shouldn't those people who got the vaccine have the freedom to live if some anti-vaxxer gives them covid?
 
In regards to inter-racial couples, all I can say is that I see a lot of them today, among my own generation and much more in my children's and grand-children's generation. I suspect than in 20 years this issue will disappear as an issue.
I've noticed a lot more inter-racial couples, too. It is a relief not to "stick out" in a crowd as much as before.
I think this is a good indicator of our progress on true racial integration. Things have changed and gotten better, when I was a kid interracial marriage, miscegenation, was illegal. That only changed in 1967 when the Supreme Court found these laws unconstitutional. Although unenforceable many of these laws stayed on the books for a time, Alabama only changing in 2000.

Now I have a niece married to a black man, they have a child. I am sure people notice, but the husband has been well accepted into the family, no objections, no problems. That would not have happened just a few years back.

@carouselsilver you and your husband are brave people. When were you married? Pennsylvania was one of the first states to legalize, but it must still have been rare, and in some circles not well accepted. I am sure you had issues beyond sticking out. Don't suppose you vacationed to the deep south...

I doubt the issue will completely disappear in 20 years, but it has to keep getting better.

Interracial marriage in the United States

 
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JaniceM

Well-known Member
I think this is a good indicator of our progress on true racial integration. Things have changed and gotten better, when I was a kid interracial marriage, miscegenation, was illegal. That only changed in 1967 when the Supreme Court found these laws unconstitutional. Although unenforceable many of these laws stayed on the books for a time, Alabama only changing in 2000.

Now I have a niece married to a black man, they have a child. I am sure people notice, but the husband has been well accepted into the family, no objections, no problems. That would not have happened just a few years back.

@carouselsilver you and your husband are brave people. When were you married? Pennsylvania was one of the first states to legalize, but it must still have been rare, and in some circles not well accepted. I am sure you had issues beyond sticking out. Don't suppose you vacationed to the deep south...

I doubt the issue will completely disappear in 20 years, but it has to keep getting better.

Interracial marriage in the United States

Of all the "these days" things that totally stuns me beyond belief, this topic is at or at least near the top of this list. I mean I cannot for anything understand how/why anyone would consider "race" to be a factor at all in who individuals marry.. and it's quite new to me.

There's a rather lengthy quote in a book I have here, but it seems the approaches of 'natural law' and 'natural separation of the races' were summed up by a judge in Pennsylvania, 1867, (forgive the vulgar expression) 'talking out of his a&&.' It could be where individuals these days got these ideas from.
 

Paco Dennis

Well-known Member
Location
Mid-Missouri
In my bachelor days, around 36, I was having a beer at a local bar and grill and got interested in a very unique bartender. She spoke with a weird accent so I asked her where she was from. Australia she says...Perth. I liked her right away so I asked her if she was free. ( meaning with anybody special at the time ). She said...and I will remember this till I die..."Is anybody ever really free?"

She turned out to be one my best friends for several years...( platonic ) :)
 
Location
Eastern PA
I think this is a good indicator of our progress on true racial integration. Things have changed and gotten better, when I was a kid interracial marriage, miscegenation, was illegal. That only changed in 1967 when the Supreme Court found these laws unconstitutional. Although unenforceable many of these laws stayed on the books for a time, Alabama only changing in 2000.

Now I have a niece married to a black man, they have a child. I am sure people notice, but the husband has been well accepted into the family, no objections, no problems. That would not have happened just a few years back.

@carouselsilver you and your husband are brave people. When were you married? Pennsylvania was one of the first states to legalize, but it must still have been rare, and in some circles not well accepted. I am sure you had issues beyond sticking out. Don't suppose you vacationed to the deep south...

I doubt the issue will completely disappear in 20 years, but it has to keep getting better.

Interracial marriage in the United States

We have only been married for twelve years, and we met and married in Florida. No problems there, except for the staring. I used to joke that we were a celebrity couple and people were staring because they wanted our autographs. Gotta have a sense of humor!
 

Murrmurr

Well-known Member
what makes you think people in Hong Kong aren't free ?....there's places like North Korea where the populations certainly are not free in most senses of the western way...
The CCP has been cracking down hard on Hong Kong for the past couple years, and thousands have been arrested for crimes against the gov't ever since the enforcement of the CCP's new national security laws written specifically for Hong Kong.

This year, Hong-Kong residents are leaving in droves because there's nothing more they can do at this point - no more freedoms for them to enjoy and defend.
 

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
The CCP has been cracking down hard on Hong Kong for the past couple years, and thousands have been arrested for crimes against the gov't ever since the enforcement of the CCP's new national security laws written specifically for Hong Kong.

This year, Hong-Kong residents are leaving in droves because there's nothing more they can do at this point - no more freedoms for them to enjoy and defend.
They've all come here because we ruled Hong Kong until 1997 for 150 years so they all think of themselves as British
 


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