Do You Know Anyone with Autism?

Lewkat

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey, USA
My adoptive grandson's wife has Asperger's Syndrome. She is a brilliant young lady, had her Master's in chemistry at 21 and is an assistant professor in chemistry. She is the mother of 3. Twins plus one and is doing fine. She had the best as a youngster in the way of training and understanding plus the realization that she was exceptionally bright.
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
Yes, a friend of the family has a son who's 20 now - and a tragedy waiting to happen - another Adam Lanza in the making. Her mother is in complete denial about him (just like Adam's idiotic mother) & never got him any counseling or therapy. She spends his monthly check on herself, instead & says, "Well, it's in God's hands."
He destroyed the plumbing in her house & damaged things in our house & we were forced to tell his mother not to bring him here any more. He's already not allowed in any of her other friends' or family's houses.
 

Sunny

SF VIP
Location
Maryland
Yes, I know several people with autism. One young man, with the social skills of a 5-year-old, walks around loudly greeting everyone. The weird thing is that he has a brilliant memory, and always remembers everyone's name, even after only meeting them once. I'm talking about thousands of people.

He's also good with computers and likes to hang out in the computer room annoying everyone. His favorite trick is to invite a woman over to look at his computer screen, because he needs her "help," Of course, it always has a porn picture on it. We've all fallen for it once, never again.
 

wcwbf

Member
have been a student or teacher pretty much whole life. just finished as a teacher aide with special needs HS kids... loved it. everything i knew about that population i learned on the job. had NO previous training. but i'm opinionated enough to come to some conclusions that i'm fairly sure i'm right about.

i think many autistic kids learn they hold a special "card" they can play whenever they want it. i think if a kid can do things for therm self they should do it for themselves. EX: there's no reason for a teacher/aide to walk across the room to get a pencil for them to write with when they can do it for themselves! i've seen autistic kids go from interacting and contributing to activities of the "experts" comes in to the room. become totally helpless when one walks into the room.
 

Phoenix

Senior Member
Location
U S
All three of my college friend's children were diagnosed with it. He keeps up on the stuff. I haven't seen them since they were babies. He lives in another part of the state.
 

Gary O'

Well-known Member
Location
Oregon
Do You Know Anyone with Autism?


Yes, my granddaughter
along with dravet syndrome
She's seven now, and not expected to see her teens
Last night, my son had to administer CPR to revive her from a severe epileptic seizure
Those occurrences are becoming more and more common
 
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Phoenix

Senior Member
Location
U S
Yes, my granddaughter
along with dravet syndrome
She's seven now, and not expected to see her teens
Last night, my son had to administer CPR to revive her from a severe epileptic seizure
Those occurrences are becoming more and more common
I'm so sorry. That must be difficult for you and your family.
 

Phoenix

Senior Member
Location
U S
My son is my hero
Today, he told us 'God gave her to me'
'Without her, I'd not know God'


He's as tough as they come
Works night and day...hard
Commercial fishing
Faith is constantly by his side
I'm glad he's found a way through it.
 

tbeltrans

Member
I often hear the term "on the autism spectrum", apparently referring to different intensities of it. There is a guy in our condo association who apparently is on the autism spectrum, but is able to function reasonably well. Most people don't like him because he doesn't say "hello" when passing in the hallway (my reaction - what?!?!?!).

Anyway I was president of our association for many years until I was finally able to hand that responsibility to a very capable woman who has a real interest in our association. During the time I was president, the couple needed some work done in their condo, so they decided to do some remodeling, and had to involve me and our management company in the approvals. During that process, I was able to talk to the husband, David. When we discovered that we had both been software engineers, doing similar work, he couldn't talk enough. He is a fascinating guy, was a professor at Stanford as well as doing advanced development work, and now teaches math part time at one of the local private universities. To me, he is a friendly, brilliant man.

To most in our association, he is unfriendly and standoffish. My knows something about autism and said that this is a typical situation. If you can establish safe common ground, you can form a relationship. It is unfortunate that some people judge quickly and harshly, and I have tried to change minds about David around here to no avail.

Tony
 

tbeltrans

Member
Living in the moment is a good way to go. I practice mindfulness myself.
The thing that made the most sense to me about mindfulness and living in the moment is to consider that the past and the future are not here and cannot hurt us. What we do and experience in this moment matters. There is certainly more to the practice of mindfulness and I am becoming more aware of some of it, but that alone was enough to show me the immediate value in learning about the practice, and it does take practice. :)

Tony
 

Phoenix

Senior Member
Location
U S
The thing that made the most sense to me about mindfulness and living in the moment is to consider that the past and the future are not here and cannot hurt us. What we do and experience in this moment matters. There is certainly more to the practice of mindfulness and I am becoming more aware of some of it, but that alone was enough to show me the immediate value in learning about the practice, and it does take practice. :)

Tony
Yes, it does take practice. It's especially helpful when going through something painful.
 

moviequeen1

Well-known Member
Location
Buffalo,NY
No,but one of my nieces,Katie is a special ed teacher in the NYC school system
She has been teaching kindergarten autistic kids for over 10 yrs,has 2 assistants to help her
She finds it very rewarding kudos to her and other special ed teachers
 

CarolfromTX

Senior Member
Location
Central Texas
Over the years, I've encountered only one student diagnosed with autism, but suspected I had some others somewhere on the spectrum. He required some patience, but we managed. Patience and understanding was the key. He was very good in math.
 

AnnieA

Senior Member
Location
Down South
My nephew functions high enough to be mainstreamed as a sophomore in a small private high school, but I'm not sure he'll be able to handle college.

He was vaccine injured. His initial post vaccine symptoms following a round of multiples at 18 months were fever and listlessness. His fever ended by the next day, but socialization and verbal ability deteriorated rapidly following that day. Within several weeks, he lost from 20+ words to one word. He went from a gregarious, happy little boy to sitting in corners staring at the wall for hours and quit making eye contact with us. Sensory issues started and quickly went through the roof.

We know now that he has familial autoimmune disorders which probably predisposed him to vaccine injury ...but can't know for sure due to the paucity of research. Unfortunately, there are no screening mechanisms in place to determine at risk children due to the lack of research although it's known that inherited factors such as mitochondrial disorder predispose children to vaccine injury. Much of US medical research is funded by the pharmaceutical industry and they have nothing to gain from conducting further safety studies because they have liability immunity for vaccines. The pharmaceutical industry also tops the charts for lobbying the US Congress which logically has an impact on oversight.

I shared my nephew's story in another thread on SF and was put on ignore by a member because of it. One of the saddest internet moments for me because my nephew's injury and the pain it has and is still causing him and those who love him was too much for someone to handle who had picked 'sides' in a polarized issue. I disliked binary thinking many years before my nephew's injury; I most certainly hate it now.
 
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AnnieA

Senior Member
Location
Down South

Phoenix

Senior Member
Location
U S
My father was mildly dialectic.
Mother told me when he would write he wrote left to right.
She taught him to write normally.

He was a machinist in a steel plant.
Did you mean dyslectic?
My nephew functions high enough to be mainstreamed as a sophomore in a small private high school, but I'm not sure he'll be able to handle college.

He was vaccine injured. His initial post vaccine symptoms following a round of multiples at 18 months were fever and listlessness. He deteriorated rapidly following that day; within two weeks, he lost from 20+ words to one word. He went from a gregarious, happy little boy to sitting in corners staring at the wall for hours and quit making eye contact with us. Sensory issues went through the roof.

We know now that he has familial autoimmune disorders which probably predisposed him to vaccine injury ...but can't know for sure due to the paucity of research. Unfortunately, there are no screening mechanisms in place to determine at risk children due to the lack of research although it's known that inherited factors such as mitochondrial disorder predispose children to vaccine injury. Much of US medical research is funded by the pharmaceutical industry and they have nothing to gain from conducting further safety studies because they have liability immunity for vaccines. The pharmaceutical industry also tops the charts for lobbying the US Congress which logically has an impact on oversight.

I shared my nephew's story in another thread on SF and was put on ignore by a member because of it. One of the saddest internet moments for me because my nephew's injury and the pain it has and is still causing him and those who love him was too much for someone to handle who had picked 'sides' in a polarized issue. I disliked binary thinking many years before my nephew's injury; I most certainly hate it now.
I'm so sorry for your nephews injury due to the vaccine. I assume it would have done no good to sue the company. How long ago was this? How old is he now? Our bodies can be incredibly fragile. So many drugs can damage us severely.
 

AnnieA

Senior Member
Location
Down South
Did you mean dyslectic?

I'm so sorry for your nephews injury due to the vaccine. I assume it would have done no good to sue the company. How long ago was this? How old is he now? Our bodies can be incredibly fragile. So many drugs can damage us severely.
Vaccine manufacturers cannot be sued. They have liability immunity.
 

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