Does your health insurance company want to make house calls?

AprilSun

Senior Member
Location
USA
Several times a week I get a call from Housecalls which I don't answer. This has been going on for several months. Last week, I received a letter stating they had been trying to reach me and that they wanted to send a Certified Nurse Practitioner or Physician to make a house call. I ignored that too. There is no way I will let a total stranger in my home! I think they are going too far with the way so many scammers are calling and pretending to be something they're not. I have this number blocked but if I didn't, I would consider changing my insurance plan. Do they all do this today?
 

Aunt Bea

Well-known Member
Location
Near Mount Pilot
I have not run into that with my health insurance provider. Call your health insurance provider, from the number on your insurance card, and see if they are the ones initiating the call or if it may be some type of a scam.
 

AprilSun

Senior Member
Location
USA
Original Poster
I have not run into that with my health insurance provider. Call your health insurance provider, from the number on your insurance card, and see if they are the ones initiating the call or if it may be some type of a scam.
That's the crazy thing about it. It is my insurance company. The letter I received was from my insurance company. I did a google search for the phone numbers that was on the letter and the one from the phone calls and they all were listed as my insurance company. I'm still not going to do it. I just think they're going too far.
 

Gemma

Senior Member
Why not just call and complain about it and ask them to remove you from Housecalls?

Our insurance company has never done this but if they did, I'd be calling them up and showing my displeasure with receiving these annoying phone calls and mailings.
 

The medical management/Medicare supplement company that I retired from had a program like this that senior enrollees could sign up for. We would regularly send a nurse around to see them for blood pressure, blood sugar and wound checks. It was part of the program designed to keep as many people out of the hospital as possible by being proactive toward the conditions that might cause them to be hospitalized.

The home visits were interspaced with phone calls: "How are you doing today? Did you check your sugar today? Has the swelling in your legs gone down? Are you taking your pills?"

When I left, the records were showing that hospital visits were down, emergency room visits were down and we were getting positive feedback from our enrollees, many of which were saying that they were delighted that someone was checking up on them. It was a totally voluntary program.
 

AprilSun

Senior Member
Location
USA
Original Poster
Since I made my original post, I did a google search for my insurance company's name and House Calls and I found many complaints about this program. They are harassing so many people with their calls and letters. I also read many complaints from people stating they had called the company and asked for their name to be removed from this program but it hasn't helped. They still keep on calling them. Apparently our name is just added automatically because I didn't sign up for it. The letter states that it is part of my insurance plan. At least I have my telemarketer blocking device and I can block them so it won't ring here. I was just wondering if they all do this now and hoping that they don't. I'm glad to know everyone doesn't have to put up with this.
 

SeaBreeze

Endlessly Groovin'
Location
USA
I agree with Gemma, I'd just call them and make sure they remove your name from their call list so you're not harassed with a service you have no interest in. I have Kaiser insurance, and I've never heard of them doing anything like that. Unless I was an invalid and couldn't get out on my own or via other means, I wouldn't want anyone coming into my house either. I don't trust anyone these days.
 

BlondieBoomer

Senior Member
Location
California
The medical management/Medicare supplement company that I retired from had a program like this that senior enrollees could sign up for. We would regularly send a nurse around to see them for blood pressure, blood sugar and wound checks. It was part of the program designed to keep as many people out of the hospital as possible by being proactive toward the conditions that might cause them to be hospitalized.

The home visits were interspaced with phone calls: "How are you doing today? Did you check your sugar today? Has the swelling in your legs gone down? Are you taking your pills?"

When I left, the records were showing that hospital visits were down, emergency room visits were down and we were getting positive feedback from our enrollees, many of which were saying that they were delighted that someone was checking up on them. It was a totally voluntary program.
If that's what this is, it sounds like it could be a good thing if you have health problems. But if you're in good health, I could see where it could be annoying. I guess having someone you don't know trying to make a house call could seem kind of intrusive. But if you were recovering from an illness or had some health issues going on it could be a good way to possibly avoid a doctor's visit for small issues.
 
My carrier offered this (well, more like they suggested it was something I had to do). I called my carrier and told them I was strongly opposed to this, resented the intrusion, saw it as an invasion of my privacy, etc., and they left me alone.
 

Dudewho

Member
Location
NORTH CAROLINA
Medicare Advantage House Calls

The goal is to increase primary care physician (PCP) appointment rate and help coordinatecare. All findings are reported to your PCP.
 
Location
Texas
My insurance company said they were starting a program to have a doctor come to my home and evaluate my meds to see if I was on the right ones (there's only 2) and I wanted to opt out. They said it was strictly voluntary so I said no. They called 3 more times with different reasons why this was important and it would be such a great thing so I asked who got the information from the visit and was told it was for the insurance company, not me. My hinky alarm went off big time....they were up to something and it's doubtful it would be to my benefit.
 

WheatenLover

Member
Location
Pennsylvania
I have Blue Cross/Blue Shield, not Medicare, and some company called me last week. I told them flat out that I take my meds as ordered, eat a healthy diet, get enough exercise, and am thin. I do not need them, so they must not call me again.

I was very annoyed about this "wonderful program" the insurance company was trying to insert into my life.
 
I have Blue Cross/Blue Shield, not Medicare, and some company called me last week. I told them flat out that I take my meds as ordered, eat a healthy diet, get enough exercise, and am thin. I do not need them, so they must not call me again.

I was very annoyed about this "wonderful program" the insurance company was trying to insert into my life.
I also was annoyed at the wonderful program, which is why I told them no, too. I also told them I seriously resent the implication that I'm not competent to manage my life myself. I am also in good health and so on, and there is absolutely no way I am going to have a bunch of officious intermeddlers nosing around invading my privacy.
 

Carla

Senior Member
Location
Pa
I hope they don't pull that on me. I don't want anyone from an insurance company coming to my house. If someone else likes the idea, fine, to me that's not a service I am interested in. I take my own bp and see my doctor regularly. I am not confused about my medications and have been taking them for years without supervision. I'm unsure what there real motive is here.
 
According to my PCP, it is primarily to identify frail elderly who live alone and don't see their doctor regularly who may be heading for big trouble, like a fall, or who are not managing their meds correctly and are risking a heart attack or a serious medication problem, etc. (IMHO because it ultimately costs a lot more to manage stuff like that after the fact than if they can avoid stuff). That's fine, if a person is a frail elderly person who needs help. I think they could better identify those individuals through a phone call or another method, like a computer search to see who might be at risk, rather than implying that everyone needs a home visit. But maybe they figure those who don't need help will get pissed off and call them, like I did. Who knows.

As long as I am blessed to have most of my marbles, I don't want a bunch of strangers invading my privacy in my so-called best interests.
 

bluebreezes

Senior Member
Location
New England
I would think it would be an opt-in preventive care service on the insurance application, not a blanket service for everyone regardless of need. That sounds like it's adding unnecessary expense, just what we need our insurance companies to do.
 

Don M.

Well-known Member
Location
central Missouri
As long as I am blessed to have most of my marbles, I don't want a bunch of strangers invading my privacy in my so-called best interests.
There are some people who need someone to watch out for them. I have a neighbor who lives alone, and isn't in the best of health. I have regularly checked on him for years. About 3 years ago, we went to the city for 3 days over Christmas, and when we came back, I went over to his place. I found him wandering aimlessly around his house....he had a stroke while we were gone, and was barely able to function. I called an ambulance, and his relatives in Nebraska, and they came down for a few days. They tried to convince him to move to a care facility, but he will have nothing to do with that. When he got back home, he was on about a dozen drugs, and I did some research, and found all sorts of potential interactions...and we got the doctors to cut him down to about 7 drugs. Now, he is still not fully recovered, but can drive to town for groceries, etc., and I, or one of the other neighbors take him to the hospital when he has a checkup. I have a key to his house, and one day I will probably find him laid out on the floor.

Bottom line...if a person lives alone, and has health issues, they certainly need someone to check in on them regularly.
 

AprilSun

Senior Member
Location
USA
Original Poster
There are some people who need someone to watch out for them.
Bottom line...if a person lives alone, and has health issues, they certainly need someone to check in on them regularly.
I agree there is some that need this but it should be left up to us and if we say no, then listen. Before my husband passed away, his insurance company kept calling him several times a day for this same reason. But, he wasn't living alone and he had told them no but that made no difference. They would not listen to him and kept calling. Finely I had to call our agent and ask him to make them stop. After he did that, they stopped. That's what irritates me is the fact they won't listen to us when we say NO and won't take a hint when we don't answer for several months!
 

dearimee

New Member
Location
Charlotte nc
I have Medicare with Humana and they do try to get me to see the home health care nurse. I've done it once before when I had AARP but I tell them I'm fine and don't need an extra visit. I only see my doctor when I think necessary. They want me to go for all the preventative tests, but I'm not interested. I understand their wanting to keep abreast of everyone's well being, but I'm not into all that. But to those who are afraid of the nurse I'd assure you it's no big deal. Just an in home check up and conversation about how you're feeling. So, if you think it would be worth not going out to the doctor's then I say do it.
 

Citygirl

Well-known Member
Location
Pa.
We have Highmark Blue Cross/Blue Shield and get, I don't how many calls. If I don't know the number I just don't answer but sometimes they do leave a message on the machine. We told them a long time ago that we had our own Dr. and wasn't interested. It didn't make any difference, the calls still come. It would be a program for someone that is housebound.
 
I just find it insulting when people, including health care providers, assume I'm incapable of managing my own life just because I am older, and that's what this home health car nurse thing feels like to me. If and when I need help, I will ask for it.
 


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