History, anything goes, including pictures

mellowyellow

Senior Member
new zealand.jpg

February 6
Waitangi, New Zealand

Neve Ardern Gayford, daughter of Jacinda Ardern, watches proceedings at Beat the Retreat on a national holiday that celebrates the signing of the treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840 by Maori chiefs and the British crown, that granted the Maori people the rights of British citizens and ownership of their lands

Photograph: Fiona Goodall/Getty Images
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA

Nicholas Romanov ll, Czar of Russia
May 18, 1868-July 17, 1918

On the night of July 16, 1918, a Bolshevik assassination squad executed Czar Nicholas II, his wife, Alexandra, and their five children, putting an end to the Romanov family dynasty.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Execution_of_the_Romanov_family
 

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RnR

Member
6 February 1952 – Elizabeth II becomes queen regnant of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms upon the death of her father, George VI. At the exact moment of succession, she was in a tree house at the Treetops Hotel in Kenya.

During 1951, George VI’s health declined and Elizabeth frequently stood in for him at public events. When she toured Canada and visited President Harry S. Truman in Washington, D.C., in October 1951, her private secretary, Martin Charteris, carried a draft accession declaration in case the King died while she was on tour.

King George VI arrives at London Airport to say goodbye to Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip ahead of the tour, 31 January 1952.



On 31 January 1952, King George VI farewelled his daughter and the Duke of Edinburgh, who were leaving the UK to embark on a tour of Australia and New Zealand by way of Kenya.

The Treetops cabin where the couple stayed.



A relaxed and carefree princess stepped off a plane in Kenya the next day. After greeting enthusiastic crowds in Nairobi, the couple set off on a five-day wildlife safari. The royal party travelled deep into the Aberdare National Park, arriving at Treetops on 5 February.

Treetops became famous around the world when Princess Elizabeth, stayed there at the time of the death of her father, King George VI, which occurred on the night of 5–6 February 1952. The couple stayed in a small cabin, perched high in an enormous fig tree 20 metres above the ground, the only one of its kind at the time. Avid home-movie aficionados, they filmed elephants, rhinos, giraffes and a host of other wildlife from their cabin.

The Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Elizabeth in the grounds of Sagana Lodge.



The royal party left Treetops on February 6, 1952, and went to Sagana Lodge, some 40 kilometres away. Sagana Lodge was originally built as a royal residence, a wedding present for Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh on their marriage in 1947.

It was there a telegram arrived saying the king had died. Prince Philip received the news first. He took his 25-year-old wife for a walk in the garden where, at 2.45 pm on 6 February, he told her that her father was dead and she was now Queen and head of the Commonwealth. She reacted with the same sense of duty that she has shown ever since, immediately discussing the practicalities of getting back to England and writing letters of apology for the cancellation of the tour. She left Sagana Lodge towards dusk that evening to return home.



The legendary hunter Jim Corbett, her bodyguard at the time, wrote the now famous lines in the Treetops visitors’ log book,

“For the first time in the history of the world, a young girl climbed into a tree one day a Princess and after having what she described as her most thrilling experience she climbed down from the tree next day a Queen — God bless her.”
 

OneEyedDiva

Well-known Member
Location
New Jersey
This iconic photo was taken during a celebration in Times Square upon the news that World War II had ended. The link provides background on what happened before and after the photo was taken. Several people claimed to be the kissers and one, George Mendonca, was finally proven to be the man in the photo. Greta Friedman is likely the woman. Mendonca said his girlfriend at the time is standing in the background. http://goodnewsplanet.com/famous-kissing-couple-world-war-ii/

GVTIV2V65II6TFEGIBWI6S7HAY.jpg
 

mellowyellow

Senior Member
This iconic photo was taken during a celebration in Times Square upon the news that World War II had ended. The link provides background on what happened before and after the photo was taken. Several people claimed to be the kissers and one, George Mendonca, was finally proven to be the man in the photo. Greta Friedman is likely the woman. Mendonca said his girlfriend at the time is standing in the background. http://goodnewsplanet.com/famous-kissing-couple-world-war-ii/

View attachment 148270
Oh I love that photo One Eye, it's historic and so memorable,
 

Lewkat

Well-known Member
Location
New Jersey, USA

Nicholas Romanov ll, Czar of Russia
May 18, 1868-July 17, 1918

On the night of July 16, 1918, a Bolshevik assassination squad executed Czar Nicholas II, his wife, Alexandra, and their five children, putting an end to the Romanov family dynasty.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Execution_of_the_Romanov_family
Beside the horrible Stalinist era, this was one of the worst crimes ever committed by the Russian people. Nicholas really was not a bad Tsar, but he was caught by circumstances of war and a terrible mess at home.
 

Lewkat

Well-known Member
Location
New Jersey, USA
This iconic photo was taken during a celebration in Times Square upon the news that World War II had ended. The link provides background on what happened before and after the photo was taken. Several people claimed to be the kissers and one, George Mendonca, was finally proven to be the man in the photo. Greta Friedman is likely the woman. Mendonca said his girlfriend at the time is standing in the background. http://goodnewsplanet.com/famous-kissing-couple-world-war-ii/

View attachment 148270
I was only 12 but oh boy, do I ever remember this and that day. So much noise and revelry. A day to remember.
 

mellowyellow

Senior Member

Nicholas Romanov ll, Czar of Russia
May 18, 1868-July 17, 1918

On the night of July 16, 1918, a Bolshevik assassination squad executed Czar Nicholas II, his wife, Alexandra, and their five children, putting an end to the Romanov family dynasty.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Execution_of_the_Romanov_family
So cruel.
After decades of mystery, the Russian Investigative Committee has concluded that they have found the bones and remains of Nicholas II and his family. https://www.dw.com/en/russia-forest...r-of-russia-and-the-romanov-family/a-54223877
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA
Beside the horrible Stalinist era, this was one of the worst crimes ever committed by the Russian people. Nicholas really was not a bad Tsar, but he was caught by circumstances of war and a terrible mess at home.
I don't think he was evil either but he was ignorant about many issues and weak.
Yes, it was a terrible crime.

King George V of England was first cousins to both Nicholas and his wife, Alexandra, but refused them asylum.
 

Lewkat

Well-known Member
Location
New Jersey, USA
I don't think he was evil either but he was ignorant about many issues and weak.
Yes, it was a terrible crime.

King George V of England was first cousins to both Nicholas and his wife, Alexandra, but refused them asylum.
Nicholas was blinded by his love for his wife. George refused him asylum because of the war and the outcome it would have had on the UK at that time.
 

mellowyellow

Senior Member
vase.jpg
The priceless Portland Vase, restored and back on display in the British Museum

February 7,1845 — Unique, priceless and irreplaceable, the Portland Vase, thought to date back to the first century BC, was shattered into more than 80 pieces on this day. A drunken visitor to the British Museum threw a sculpted stone exhibit at the glass cabinet containing the treasured artefact.

The glass Roman vase, 24.5cm high, was discovered in a funerary monument in Rome in the 16th century. After belonging to several different owners it was acquired in 1784 by the Duchess of Portland, a noted collector of antiquities.

In 1810 the 4th Duke of Portland loaned the vase to the British Museum in London for permanent exhibition, where it was seemingly safe forever.

But neither the duke nor the museum had anticipated what would happen when William Lloyd paid a visit on this day. Apparently he had been drinking for several days and was well intoxicated when he hurled a sculpture at the glass case containing the Portland Vase.

Lloyd, who said he was a student at Trinity College, Dublin, was arrested and later appeared in court charged with causing wilful damage. But his lawyers argued that the law under which he was being prosecuted applied only to the destruction of objects worth no more than five pounds.

As a result he was convicted only of destroying the glass case and was fined three pounds.
 

RnR

Member
7 February 2009 – Black Saturday Bushfires in Victoria cause 173 deaths in the deadliest bushfires in Australia’s history.

The Black Saturday bushfires were a series of bushfires that ignited or were burning across the Australian state of Victoria on and around Saturday, 7 February 2009 and were Australia’s all-time worst bushfire disasters. The fires occurred during extreme bushfire-weather conditions and resulted in Australia’s highest ever loss of life from a bushfire; 173 people died and 414 were injured as a result of the fires.



The Bushfires Royal Commission gave a “conservative” estimate of the total cost of the Black Saturday bushfires of A$4.4 billion not counting the cost of the injuries received, uninsured properties and agricultural losses.
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA
View attachment 148388
The priceless Portland Vase, restored and back on display in the British Museum

February 7,1845 — Unique, priceless and irreplaceable, the Portland Vase, thought to date back to the first century BC, was shattered into more than 80 pieces on this day. A drunken visitor to the British Museum threw a sculpted stone exhibit at the glass cabinet containing the treasured artefact.

The glass Roman vase, 24.5cm high, was discovered in a funerary monument in Rome in the 16th century. After belonging to several different owners it was acquired in 1784 by the Duchess of Portland, a noted collector of antiquities.

In 1810 the 4th Duke of Portland loaned the vase to the British Museum in London for permanent exhibition, where it was seemingly safe forever.

But neither the duke nor the museum had anticipated what would happen when William Lloyd paid a visit on this day. Apparently he had been drinking for several days and was well intoxicated when he hurled a sculpture at the glass case containing the Portland Vase.

Lloyd, who said he was a student at Trinity College, Dublin, was arrested and later appeared in court charged with causing wilful damage. But his lawyers argued that the law under which he was being prosecuted applied only to the destruction of objects worth no more than five pounds.

As a result he was convicted only of destroying the glass case and was fined three pounds.
What an amazing vase! And an amazing story.
 

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