I dislike the highjacking of our language.

AZ Jim

Old, alone and tired...
Remember when one could comment on how queer a situation was?
How 'bout having a gay time on Sunday?
And Rubbers that used to protect our feet on rainy days.
Hook up no longer means your getting cable.
If years ago you pulled a boner, it meant somehow messed up.
Remember when thongs went on your feet, not your butt?


Got more???
 

hollydolly

Well-known member
Location
London England
Cell used to mean a room in a Jail..now it also means a mobile phone

Tool used to mean something you used to fix something..now it means idiot

Sick used to mean ill..now it also means something awesome


(btw rubbers are still called rubbers here in the Uk it's another word for erasers)...
 

Kadee46

Well-known member
Location
South Australia
Another couple of words I find confusing now is Wicked , that meant someone was bad , now I believe it means something " Good" and cool meant it was a little cool you needed a jumper. Now it's a sign of approval that's OK " Cool" How many old songs have in them happy I'm happy and gay??

Sorry oak Apple you had already mentioned Wicked
 
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AZ Jim

Old, alone and tired...
Original Poster
I was saying cool in 1949 and never stopped though for many of the years between then and now the usage dropped to almost nothing. I think it's cool.
 

Ameriscot

New member
I was saying cool in 1949 and never stopped though for many of the years between then and now the usage dropped to almost nothing. I think it's cool.
All this time I gave credit to the 60's kids! Although I had an inkling it was also used in the 50's by jazz musicians.
 

AZ Jim

Old, alone and tired...
Original Poster
Cool — This is one of those words that never gets old, and it has what seems like a million slightly different connotations. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, its earliest slang meaning dates to 1728, to describe large sums of money, a usage still in circulation. It started to mean “calmly audacious” in 1825, and “fashionable” in 1933.
 


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