I just got deactivated in NextDoor

Remy

Senior Member
Location
California, USA
No, I only have a land-line service.
Deb, I'd get a cell phone. As a single woman, you should have one. My service stops soon as I cancelled it (because my crappy little flip phone was becoming obsolete) and I'm going to go with Consumer Cellular. I rarely used my phone but for about 26 dollars a month, it's good peace of mind and came in handy a few times.
 

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
Once upon a time, all you had to do was fill out a Change of Address card at the Post Office.
I don't see why one requires a cellphone to do this.
No this is for the 'nextdoor'' app... to become a member of your neighbourhood "Nextdoor'' app.. you have to give a phone number or an address to prove you do actually live in the area.. they send a code on a postcard to your home address and or to your phone... with that code you activate your account...
 
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Bonnie

SF VIP
Location
Texas
Why is it so important to get mail at the Post Office?
... It seems a mailbox at your house would be so much easier for everything, and you wouldn't have to pay rent for a box.


I always thought NextDoor was about neighborhood activity, and things happening on the streets in the neighborhood.
That's what we have here anyway.

A post office box "address" doesn't really fit in with the description of that program.
 

Nathan

Senior Member
I don't remember it being this complicated when I first signed up.
Internet use has become more complicated, 2 factor authentication is being forced down user's throats, no opting out.

I understand that 2FA is a necessity with everyone's data being compromised, but it's a pain-in-the-a**.

Encryption is a good measure, too bad corporations & government agencies didn't want to spend the effort to encrypt their databases. :rolleyes:
 
Why is it so important to get mail at the Post Office?
... It seems a mailbox at your house would be so much easier for everything, and you wouldn't have to pay rent for a box.


I always thought NextDoor was about neighborhood activity, and things happening on the streets in the neighborhood.
That's what we have here anyway.

A post office box "address" doesn't really fit in with the description of that program.
Where I live there is only box delivery available which is provided free by the post awful. The only other option would be to to get rural carrier delivery forfeiting the box, but for me, it's literally as far to go where a box would be set up as going to the post office with none of the security. If a person in town does that the box will only be set up on the carrier's current travel route, not at their home. The only exceptions would be for medical hardship, but I don't know if they still do that, and that takes months to get. Most of the small towns around here that still have a post office are like that.

I'd guess NextDoor won't use a PO box address is because you can get a box and not rent, own, or inhabit property in that community.
 

Murrmurr

Well-known Member
Internet use has become more complicated, 2 factor authentication is being forced down user's throats, no opting out.

I understand that 2FA is a necessity with everyone's data being compromised, but it's a pain-in-the-a**.

Encryption is a good measure, too bad corporations & government agencies didn't want to spend the effort to encrypt their databases. :rolleyes:
I always opt-out. Sometimes I can only do that by clicking on "Remind me later", which is always in tiny print down at the bottom, so with those it's just a matter of time, I suppose. But I've seen articles arguing that the 2-auth system is fraught with security issues - if that don't beat all - and some sites that had it (banks online, mostly) have stopped using it.
 
Deb, If you are in a situation where you are only offered PO Box delivery, have the mail sent to your street address, they should put it in your box, albeit it may get a sticker telling you to inform sender of your correct address. A lot of senders simply won't use a box address even if you have provided it, in my experience it's been mostly government agencies.
 

John cycling

Healthy Person Missing Aunt Marg
Get a Google voice number. It’s free and you can send and receive text messages.

I got google voice for the free long distance and it also has texting.
The 2 factor authentication requirement is predatory, abusive and totally ridiculous.
In many cases like with crypto companies it's used to steal people's money, and they're getting away with it.
 
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Nathan

Senior Member
I always opt-out. Sometimes I can only do that by clicking on "Remind me later", which is always in tiny print down at the bottom, so with those it's just a matter of time, I suppose.

Google won't let me opt out, and neither will my favorite electronics web retailer. My bank has been using security questions during log-in for years, which I'm fine with. The two factor authentication process assumes that you'll be f-n hugging your cellphone, like some 14 yr. old. I have to hunt mine down, it's usually in whatever room I'm not. 🤬

I've seen articles arguing that the 2-auth system is fraught with security issues

I'll have to google it, I just have some gut feeling that the 2FA process is not the panacea that it's advertised to be.

Edit: Oh yea, 2FA via text is really a bad idea... https://blog.sucuri.net/2020/01/why-2fa-sms-is-a-bad-idea.html
 
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Knight

Well-known Member
All that because of not having a cell phone. Maybe it's me but having a cell phone is the way to go since you can offset the cost by eliminating what a land line costs. Don't know of a land line where you can send & receive texts, receive voice mail, & call anywhere in the world for one basic cost.

That is why we eliminated our land line & chose T-Mobile for $35.00 a month senior plan. Our land line was $17.00 a month so the reality is we get unlimited use & all the features I mentioned for $18.00 more. The peace of mind knowing that anywhere anytime we are away from home if an emergency should happen we have the ability to summon help.
 

dseag2

Dallas, TX
Location
Dallas, TX
Internet use has become more complicated, 2 factor authentication is being forced down user's throats, no opting out.

I understand that 2FA is a necessity with everyone's data being compromised, but it's a pain-in-the-a**.

Encryption is a good measure, too bad corporations & government agencies didn't want to spend the effort to encrypt their databases. :rolleyes:
I agree that it's a big pain and some require it, but I have proactively activated it for my bank, investment and credit card accounts because it means that it is less likely that someone will hack into my accounts and steal money or make false charges. They would need my phone to do that.

You're right that corporations don't take the necessary steps to protect their databases and there is nothing the government can do to intervene at this point. We have to protect ourselves.
 

dseag2

Dallas, TX
Location
Dallas, TX
All that because of not having a cell phone. Maybe it's me but having a cell phone is the way to go since you can offset the cost by eliminating what a land line costs. Don't know of a land line where you can send & receive texts, receive voice mail, & call anywhere in the world for one basic cost.

That is why we eliminated our land line & chose T-Mobile for $35.00 a month senior plan. Our land line was $17.00 a month so the reality is we get unlimited use & all the features I mentioned for $18.00 more. The peace of mind knowing that anywhere anytime we are away from home if an emergency should happen we have the ability to summon help.
I totally agree. I de-activated my office land line when I retired. But, we have the AT&T package for internet, phone and DirecTV. When I contacted them to disconnect our home land line I was advised that our price would actually go up. :unsure: We keep it connected but not plugged in due to the number of spam calls. I don't even know our home phone number. All of my communication is via my mobile phone.
 

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
The land line # in my apt. has been the same for 68! years. Since it only costs $18. a month I keep it, in the vain hope someone/anyone from my past wants to contact me.
has your landline number not changed over the years due to differing area codes..as they have here ?... When I was a kid, our number only had 4 numbers.. this evolved into 5, then 6..etc.. until now we all have 11 numbers, so it wouldn't be possible for any of us here to have the same number from childhood...
 

Pepper

Well-known Member
Location
NYC
When we moved here, we had 7 digits. The first two were the first 2 letters of a word. When it was changed to all numbers the letters were exchanged for their number values. There is a three digit area code added decades ago, but the original 7 numbers are the same.
 


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