Is it really awesome?

kevros

New Member
Location
Manchester, UK
I would love to hear from a mature person's perspective regarding the overuse (or not) of the adjective 'awesome'. I am aware of the word's informal usage, but I think it has gone a little too far. The relatively recent trend of everybody claiming that every object, mundane 'thing' and pastime to be 'awesome' is cheapening its descriptive value.

The Grand Canyon is an awesome sight. Witnessing and being a part of the birth of your first child, is an awesome experience. I have no doubt the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were also a magnificent and awesome sight. Pizza, Coffee, clothes and nights out are not awesome.

What do you think?
 

JimW

Senior Member
Location
Mass
I would love to hear from a mature person's perspective regarding the overuse (or not) of the adjective 'awesome'. I am aware of the word's informal usage, but I think it has gone a little too far. The relatively recent trend of everybody claiming that every object, mundane 'thing' and pastime to be 'awesome' is cheapening its descriptive value.

The Grand Canyon is an awesome sight. Witnessing and being a part of the birth of your first child, is an awesome experience. I have no doubt the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were also a magnificent and awesome sight. Pizza, Coffee, clothes and nights out are not awesome.

What do you think?
The informal definition of the word awesome includes "excellent", "extremely good" & "terrific". So if the word is being used in the informal sense, which I believe it is when used to describe food, clothes or other basic things, I think it's within the definition to do so. I am guilty of using the word awesome in the informal sense, so my opinion might be biased. But I do understand what you're saying.

I know you asked for a mature person's perspective but I decided to throw in my two cents anyway. 😄
 
Last edited:

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
I think the word ''awesome'' in every day conversation , has been used in the USA for a very long time. It's only relatively recently that the youth here in the UK have used it in everyday speech...
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA
I had to accept defeat on irregardless when they put it in the damn dictionary. Sigh. :confused:
Oh, my stars! It will always give me a nervous tic when I hear it!

Definition of irregardless


nonstandard
Is irregardless a word?: Usage Guide
Irregardless was popularized in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century. Its increasingly widespread spoken use called it to the attention of usage commentators as early as 1927. The most frequently repeated remark about it is that "there is no such word." There is such a word, however. It is still used primarily in speech, although it can be found from time to time in edited prose. Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead.

First Known Use of irregardless
1795, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for irregardless
probably blend of irrespective and regardless
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irregardless
 

Patio Life

Member
:) I think awesome is the trendy word of the moment.

It is difficult to explain real awe.
It is hard to tell someone how proud, happy, excited you are about something or for them or "tickled pink" about finally reaching a goal.

The younger generations have become unwordy. 140 character tweets, quick snapchat post, just a few words in a message app. New normal.
 

StarSong

Well-known Member
"Awesome" will one day go the way of groovy, wicked, boss, sick, and other slang terms used to indicate excellence. These words tend to move into and out of fashion as new generations attempt to distinguish themselves and create "in" language.
I always smile when watching an English movie or TV show and the word "brilliant" is used to mean wonderful. The US common usage of that word tends to be limited to bright in color or intelligence.

Since younger generations have already well exceeded ours in rates of college attendance and degrees, I have little fear that they will become less adept with the use of language.
 
Last edited:

win231

Senior Member
Location
CA
It's amusing to me how people start using a word, other people run away with it & it becomes common for everything - whether it's really awesome or not.
I chuckle whenever someone starts a sentence - answers a question with "So."
Or, a black person saying, "I axed him what I should do," or "We conversated about it," or "See what I'm sayin'?"
Or, someone from the South saying, "We're fixin' to do some traveling."
The term, "Cool" for something nice is also funny.
 

win231

Senior Member
Location
CA
I JUST LOVE ACCENTS! Any kind - Southern or foreign. It's really boring when everybody talks the same.

My mom had a sister from England. She stayed with us for a couple of weeks when we were kids. My sister & I never had so much fun with any of her other relatives. She would use different words & phrases. Instead of the word, "also," she'd say "as well." We'd always answer, "As well as what?" & she'd LOL. A car's trunk was a "Bonnet." She was also surprised when we put clothes in the dryer; she'd say, "Why not hang them outside where the sun will refresh them?"
 

Sassycakes

Well-known Member
Location
Pennsylvania
This thread reminded me of the time years ago when my husbands older brother stayed with us for a week Whenever he was talking he always said "But I digress" . By the time he went home I was just about ready to scream. I can't stand that phrase.
 

hypochondriac

Senior Member
Location
Australia
This thread reminded me of the time years ago when my husbands older brother stayed with us for a week Whenever he was talking he always said "But I digress" . By the time he went home I was just about ready to scream. I can't stand that phrase.
but i digress 😄
im gonna use that one on here sassy
 

Top