Losing Weight by Cutting Carbs

SeaBreeze

Endlessly Groovin'
Location
USA
I've done this in the past in a limited way, and it does help take off the pounds and likely avoid or control type 2 diabetes. More information on why simple carbs in sweets, breads, potatoes, etc. help you put on and keep the weight. Full article here.

Carbohydrates provide your body with glucose (blood sugar), its main fuel source. Popular snacks and binge-worthy foods tend to be simple carbs, including sugary sweets and baked goods made from refined flours.

Fruits and vegetables are complex carbohydrates, which include higher levels of fiber and other healthful substances. In addition, this category covers starches such as whole grains and legumes (beans, peas, etc., some of which also supply protein).

The higher glucose levels that occur when you eat too much simple carbohydrate can interfere with insulin, the body’s main blood sugar controller.

Under such conditions, extra calories are much more easily stored as body fat and results in unwanted weight gain, says nutritionist Keith Kantor, PhD, CEO of the Nutritional Addiction Mitigation Eating and Drinking (NAMED) program in Atlanta, which helps people with mental illnesses through dietary changes.

However, he says, “when glucose levels are cut off due to low-carb dieting, the body starts to burn fat instead.”

Restricting carbohydrate intake also reduces the amount of insulin released into your bloodstream, adds nutritional biochemist Catherine Metzgar, PhD, RD, of Virta, a San Francisco-based online medical clinic specializing in type 2 diabetes. She explains, “Insulin is the body’s fat storage hormone, so, the less of it that is released, the easier time you will have losing weight.”

Insulin resistance is essentially a result of carbohydrate intolerance, Metzgar notes, and a low-carb diet reduces the very foods that increase insulin levels most—carbs. By eliminating the root cause of elevated insulin levels in the body, low-carb dieters “are able to naturally improve glucose control, lose weight, and reduce hunger and cravings,” she says.
 

Aunt Bea

Well-known member
Location
Near Mount Pilot
I've done the no carb/low carb diets and they do work but I missed the carbs and found myself going from one extreme to another.

Now I'm living with a low fat plant based slow carb/high fiber diet and have found that to be a compromise that I can live with.

The important thing is to keep at it until you find a healthful day to day eating plan that suits you, it's definitely worth the effort.
 

Camper6

Well-known member
I went on a low fat diet years ago because I was told I had high cholesterol.

I couldn't believe how much weight I was losing and it got so bad I couldn't sit down. I had no buttocks to speak of.

So I went to the doctor and told him and he recommended I go off the diet before we do testing.

It took me a month to put back a couple of pounds and I was splurging on milkshakes and hamburgers.

I think a low fat diet works better than cutting out carbs. I have been able to maintain my weight now without any special considerations.

But I do notice my portions are a lot smaller than they used to be.
 

hearlady

Well-known member
Location
N Carolina
I've done the no carb/low carb diets and they do work but I missed the carbs and found myself going from one extreme to another.

Now I'm living with a low fat plant based slow carb/high fiber diet and have found that to be a compromise that I can live with.

The important thing is to keep at it until you find a healthful day to day eating plan that suits you, it's definitely worth the effort.
I've come around to this exact thinking. It's actually more like the way of thinking I grew up with before all the fads came around.
We have so much knowledge now about health and nutrition to supplement our basic knowledge of healthy eating and lifestyle.
I can live with it too.
 

Vinny

New member
Location
FL
I lost 60 lbs. by watching my carbs and limiting my meals to between 40-60 carbs. My doctor did not recognize me when he saw me 6 months later. Plus my A1C went from 7.4 to 5.2
 

JB in SC

New member
Location
Upstate
I did the same as Vinny, lost about 60 pounds with near identical results. I didn't cut out all my carbs, most of mine was from sugared drinks and other empty calories. I can't tolerate a high cholesterol diet. Once I got the weight off I just didn't eat as much, which is pretty normal for older people. A lot of my friends and family don't see how I can pass up a piece of cake or ice cream, but really once I did without them I can easily skip them. I will have something sweet for my birthday or at special occasions but I watch my portion sizes. No way I can (or want to) eat as I once did, my wife and I can easily split a normal restaurant meal.
 

Happyflowerlady

Vagabond Flowerchild
Location
Northern Alabama
I have done just about the same things as Aunt Bea (she could be writing my story), and am happily now on a plant based , complex carb way of eating as well. I really like this, and i don’t miss meat in my diet at all. Actually, I am about 90% plant-based, and i still add meat to some foods, but more as a flavor enhancer than as a main part of the meal, like Atkins-style diets did.
If I make a pot of chili beans, I will usually add just a small amount of hamburger to the pot, and it gives that real chili flavor, but doesn’t add much extra fat to the chili.
I track my food intake on an app called CarbManager, and this enables me to stay low-carb, low-fat, and make sure that I am getting about the right amounts of protein, fats and carbs each day.
It syncs with my Health app on the phone, so it is part of my overall health tracking, and i really like that. The Health app also tell me how much of each vitamin and mineral I am getting with my meals, so I can see if I need to supplement on any of those as well.
 

SeaBreeze

Endlessly Groovin'
Location
USA
Original Poster
The Low Down on Low Carb Diets and Weight Loss

Carbohydrates provide your body with glucose (blood sugar), its main fuel source. Popular snacks and binge-worthy foods tend to be simple carbs, including sugary sweets and baked goods made from refined flours. Fruits and vegetables are complex carbohydrates, which include higher levels of fiber and other healthful substances. In addition, this category covers starches such as whole grains and legumes (beans, peas, etc., some of which also supply protein).

No fixed definition exists for low-carb diets, but most follow similar guidelines. Since carbohydrates include sugar, starch and fiber, a low-carb regimen is based on meats, fish, eggs, nuts, seeds, low-carbohydrate vegetables and fruits (such as greens and berries) and healthy fats. High-carb foods are forbidden or limited; they include refined grains, potatoes, sugary drinks and sweets.

Specific plans vary in carbohydrate content. The most restrictive may be as low as 20 to 50 grams of carbs per day, which strictly limits fruit, aside from berries, although this level allows for some vegetables. A plan of 50 to 100 carb grams includes vegetables and fruits; the least-restrictive plans, in the 100- to 150-gram range, may include some starchy foods.

Paths to Weight Loss

The higher glucose levels that occur when you eat too much simple carbohydrate can interfere with insulin, the body’s main blood sugar controller. Under such conditions, extra calories are much more easily stored as body fat and results in unwanted weight gain, says nutritionist Keith Kantor, PhD, CEO of the Nutritional Addiction Mitigation Eating and Drinking (NAMED) program in Atlanta, which helps people with mental illnesses through dietary changes.

However, he says, “when glucose levels are cut off due to low-carb dieting, the body starts to burn fat instead.”
SOURCE
 

Vinny

New member
Location
FL
Diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and had to lose weight. I started to look at the carbs in the foods I was eating and was shocked how high they were. I simply chose foods with lower carb counts and limited most of my meals to 40-60 carbs with the occasional cheeseburger or Pizza and lost 45 pounds in 6 months and my a1C went from 7.4 to 5.1. My doctor was shocked at how low it went. Switched to whole wheat pasta and bread. Very little rice and other things high in carbs. Made a big difference.
 

Camper6

Well-known member
Alright. Now is this controversial.

The way I feel about it.

It doesn't matter what you eat whether it's carbs or not.

As long as the calories you ingest are equal to or less than what your body requires.

Is that accurate or not.

From my Better Homes and Gardens published around 1950.

excerpt:
No diets! No fasting! Food makes us fat--It's as simple as that. Eat more than your body requires and it's stored as fat. To lose or gain weight--count your calories. A calorie is a measure of the fattening tendencies of food. By counting calories and staying within your caloric quota, you can eat everything an still lose weight or gain.
The secret? When you splurge with a high-calorie-content food, compensate with a low calorie vegetable or dessert. And vice versa. Then by all means watch the extras. They mount up rapidly and alone can account for a large percentage of your calorie quota.
Figure the calories your body needs just to keep in top physical condition.

1. Estimate your ideal weight for your height and build. (Most weight charts are for the average person. Large boned people may top this average by 10 to 20 percent, slender boned ones fall under it)

2. Multiply your "ideal" weight by 15. (your body needs 15 to 20 calories per pound per day)

3. In order to lose weight, reduce the answer above by one third. In order to gain, in most cases add one third. The result is your calorie quota for one day.

4. Divide your total for your three meals.


There is a chart included for calories and Recommended Daily Dietary Allowances.

Women- 123 pounds- Sedentary 2000 Active 2400
Men-154 pounds- Sedentary 2400 Active 3000
 

Kitties

New member
I've lost some weight recently even being under a lot of stress. I was about 8-9 pounds less than I expected when I went to the doctor a couple of weeks ago so that was a boost. But they had a new digital scale and I wonder if that was the issue. But my clothes seem looser. I don't have a scale at home.

I love carbs and I don't believe in eating what you don't like. It's a recipe for failure. I've greatly limited chips and low on any sweets (mostly just eating some cereals) and watching portions. So far so good.
 

AprilT

New member
I've done this in the past in a limited way, and it does help take off the pounds and likely avoid or control type 2 diabetes. More information on why simple carbs in sweets, breads, potatoes, etc. help you put on and keep the weight. Full article here.
Per your title, yes, a low-carb diet works, for many people to lose weight and it also improves a whole host of health issues. Only problem for some it's difficult to sustain this way of eating long term. I've done it in the past and lost a lot of weight, I just couldn't ever stick with it for more than a few months.

I do plan to give it another try and then switch to moderately low carb which basically is what you do anyway most times when following the orignal Atkins way. Low carbing, when I stick to it, it works best for controlling my BP and keeping me from becoming a full blown diabetic. With low-carb, I can usually come off any type of blood pressure meds. It's definitely not for everyone, but for some it works wonders.
 

Colleen

Active member
Location
Arizona
My step-daughter has, unfortunately, inherited her weight and she's struggled with it for many years. She's 44 now and her current diet is the Keto diet. She's lost 11 pounds in about a month and she's got the incentive to keep going. I applaud her but I'm also concerned that not eating any carbs may not be good either. She doesn't have any health issues (thank God) and there isn't any diabetes in her family. I read recently that the Keto diet is a good diet but it's very complex and hard for people to stay on it.

Anyone have any other information on it?
 

AprilT

New member
My step-daughter has, unfortunately, inherited her weight and she's struggled with it for many years. She's 44 now and her current diet is the Keto diet. She's lost 11 pounds in about a month and she's got the incentive to keep going. I applaud her but I'm also concerned that not eating any carbs may not be good either. She doesn't have any health issues (thank God) and there isn't any diabetes in her family. I read recently that the Keto diet is a good diet but it's very complex and hard for people to stay on it.

Anyone have any other information on it?
There are levels of the Keto diet, last I saw my doctor, I told him I was checking out a book from library on it, he said great, gave me the thumbs up. I received notice the book is ready for pick up at my library, I probably won't get over there till next week Tuesday. But, I personally wouldn't ever go to the extreme long term of restricting carbs but for so long. I know first week or two of the one I usually do I it's 20 net carbs after that you raise the level of carbs allowed. All I know is I'm allowed as much bacon as I want, so I'm good with the first two weeks of eating that way. :D But I really don't care for a lot of red meat so Shrimp, fish will fill my plate often, plus I love veggies.

This gives you a visual of what keto looks like
https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/keto

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/ketogenic-diet-101#sample-meal-plan

For those trying to control blood sugar interesting article.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/07/well/live/low-carb-diet-type-1-diabetes.html
 

Happyflowerlady

Vagabond Flowerchild
Location
Northern Alabama
I was eating low carb/keto for over a year, lost some weight, and felt good. Then, I started reading about plant-based whole food diet, and it sounded like that was even healthier; so I changed over.
I didn’t actually miss meat a lot, although I still ate it sometimes, and especially seafood like shrimp; but I did miss dairy products, cheese, and butter, etc.
Even on a low calorie diet, I was gaining weight on the PBWF diet, so then I started looking at intermittent fasting. That stopped me from gaining weight, but not losing any, plus I was having a hard time because I still had hunger pangs.
Finally, I decided that low carb/keto plus IF was a better plan, and that is what I have been doing now for a month, and (happily) I am now starting to lose weight again.

After reading more about the role that insulin plays in making us fat, and knowing that all carbs cause us to release insulin, even the slow carbs, it made sense that I needed to get my insulin resistance back under control again.

Sometimes, it almost seems like we are being programmed about foods, whether it is right or not.
A good example would be when we were told that vegetable oils were healthier for us than meat and dairy fats, as well as saturated fats like coconut oil.
Now, we know that the vegetable oils are highly processed, overheated and bleached , and very unhealthy for use as food, and that the natural unprocessed fats are much better for us.

https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a19536669/fatty-foods-with-health-benefits/
 

Olivia

Well-known member
Location
Hawaii
I lost 60 lbs. by watching my carbs and limiting my meals to between 40-60 carbs. My doctor did not recognize me when he saw me 6 months later. Plus my A1C went from 7.4 to 5.2
Definitely agree with that. I researched all about diabetes type 2 and also joined a Diabetic Message Board. I never actually had high AIC, but low carb not only reduced it further, but I lost some pounds (didn't need to lose that much). Eating that way is just a matter of habit and soon you don't miss the high carb stuff. 40-60 carbs per meal is way to high for me, but then I'm rather petite.

I blame myself because my mom had Diabetes Type 2 and she was very petite but skinny people do get it. I convinced myself that diabetes skips a generation. I don't know where I got that idea, but I was obviously living in fantasy.
 

Ferocious

Well-known member
Location
UK
I was once told to I stand on the weight-scale on one foot, then I wouldn't weigh so heavy, but when I do, I still weigh the same...............Must be doing something wrong....:D
 

Victor

Active member
Location
midwest USA
I have been on a low carb diet to lose weight for over 1 and half years--
lost only 7 pounds more or less but I don't excercise much. And I am
under the guidance of a professional dietician. Followed all her advice.
I really do not eat much either. Am frustrated!
 

AprilT

New member
I have been on a low carb diet to lose weight for over 1 and half years--
lost only 7 pounds more or less but I don't exercise much. And I am
under the guidance of a professional dietician. Followed all her advice.
I really do not eat much either. Am frustrated!
I'm not trying to blame you so bear with me, I'm just trying to understand.

Could you tell us what your daily low carb diet consist of, because eating low carb on a consistent basis and only losing 7 lbs that's unheard of, I always lose at least that much in just the first week without any exercise. Actually in some cases exercise can add weight, good weight/musle. Either your body is terribly resistant or the food plan your dietician is prescribing isn't the typical low carb diet. Also, if eating too little that could be problematic when doing low-carb. It's one thing to plateau, but 7 lbs after a whole year, highly unusual, especially for a man.

Some possible reasons as listed from some articles

Are you following a low carb diet, but not losing weight?

Have you tried a low carb diet and didn’t lose a pound ? Or maybe you lost some weight in the beginning, but have reached a plateau ? In this article, I will show you how to blast through that plateau and lose weight again with a low carb diet.
[h=2]Not Losing Weight on a Low Carb Diet?[/h] "Low-carb diets are a strong ally against some of the biggest health problems that plague the world today.

While I like a low carb diet,we all remain unique and it doesn’t always work for everyone.
Most people who give it an honest try do quite well and lose weight without restricting calories or feeling hungry.
However, after a few weeks, some people reach a plateau.
The weight may have fallen off at the beginning, but now the scale won’t budge.
If you reached a plateau or just the results you are harvesting/harvested are not as satisfying as you expected, here are a few suggestions that would explain why :
[h=2]Are you Eating Real, Whole Foods ?[/h] Eating a low-carbohydrate diet is not just about lowering your intake of carbohydrates. It is about eating real, whole, nutritious foods."

See the website for the rest of the article.

====================================================================






http://healthdaddy.org/not-losing-weight-on-low-carb-diet/
[h=1]Not Losing Weight on a Low Carb Diet? Here’s Why[/h] by John Fitt




https://blog.bulletproof.com/not-losing-weight-on-keto/
[h=1]Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight on Keto[/h]

  • There are seven main reasons you’re not losing weight on keto, despite your best efforts.
  • You’re not actually in ketosis. Ketosis is the state your body is in when it burns fat for fuel instead of carbs. Learn to accurately measure your ketone levels to know if you’re in ketosis.
  • You’re eating too much in general. There are pitfalls to over-consumption while trying to lose weight on keto. Get info on caloric needs as well as the ideal macronutrient ranges on keto.
  • You’re not eating enough. Under-consumption leads to changes in your metabolism, which derail your progress.
  • You’re eating too much protein. The keto diet is a moderate protein diet, so aim for 20-25 percent of your calories coming from protein.
  • You’re eating too many carbs. 20-50 carbs a day is typical of the keto diet. Get tips on where carbs might be lurking in your meal plan.
  • You’re intolerant or allergic to something you’re eating. The most common food allergies are to milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish and crustacean shellfish. Food allergies and intolerances can cause inflammation which can lead to weight gain.
  • You’re leptin resistant. Leptin resistance is triggered by irregular sleep, stress, overeating, and calorie restriction. Fortunately, you can reset your leptin sensitivity with the below tips.
 

PVC

Active member
Location
Southern AZ
I want to lose 23 lbs. I've tried ALL kinds of diets (healthy ones) and nothing has ever worked for me. Then last month I read the thread about the OMAD diet and C'est Moi said her husband has done it for over 30 years and has always been slim. So, I started doing it since Sept 2nd. I've been eating only from 5-7pm, and drinking water, coffee, and cranberry juice the rest of the waking hours. This is the EASIEST diet ever and I think I'll be keeping up with it. No counting calories or worrying about carbs and fat, and since I usually eat healthy anyway (no junk food or sweets) I think I'll be okay. I did cheat a couple of days, but I've lost 3 lbs, so that's one lb a week. Slow and steady is fine with me. I've heard that the less you have to lose the slower the weight loss. That will give my skin time to shrink (I hope).
 

SeaBreeze

Endlessly Groovin'
Location
USA
Original Poster
Congratulations PVC, glad you've been having success with that diet!
 


Top