More Nuthatch

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
Just love the pictures, Cee Gee!

I'm a bird-lover through and through. From spring until fall, we enjoy the likes of Dark-Eyed Juncos, who have been chasing one another and vying for the title of our property for the past month now (they're just like kids), House Sparrows, House Finches, Mountain and Black-Capped Chickadees, and Red-Breasted Nuthatches.

We usually get a run of Pine Siskins (and I do mean a run, like anywhere between dozens to 100 - 200 birds) around September, and they usually stay until October, with a few staying even later, and of course so many others, some that I haven't identified as of yet, but I can watch them for house, and often do.
 

fmdog44

Well-known Member
Location
Houston, Texas
Every year we get a visit from Super Woodpecker. It does its thing on the outside wood trim. The first time I heard it I thought it was an air hammer.
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
We have a slew of chickadees and nuthaches
Both very personable
They'll rest on my shoulder....eat outa my hand

Love 'em both

Great pics, CeeGee
That is the sweetest thing!

I have yet to get a chickadee or nuthatch to feed out of my hand or rest on my shoulder, but it warms me when I'm outside gardening and they show no concern over me, knowing I'm friend, not foe.

By far the chickadees are my very favourite.
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
Mine too
Their beaks and faces are shorter...cuter

View attachment 103597
Yes, and there's just something so sweet about them. I love how passive and tender they are, always minding their own business, and nothing pulls at my heartstrings more than watching them bath under the sprinkler!

Wiggling their tail feathers back and forth, fluttering happily, they really know how to make my day.
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
Gary.

It was a few years ago, but one early morning I went out to turn the water on, and sitting under the cedar trees with a tiny little ball of fluff. At first I almost missed it, but upon closer inspection, it was a tiny little baby chickadee.

Worried sick that he was lost or that mom had cast him away, dear husband and I were on the telephone to the veterinarian, and within seconds the vet calmed our concerns and told us not to worry. In the meantime, dear husband got the ladder, coaxed the tiny little fluff-ball into the palm of his hand, and climbing up to the top of the ladder, dear husband set the little baby down inside one of the tops of the cedar trees.

We babysat that little chickadee as if it were our own, and a few hours later mom returned with 2 other baby chickadees, fluff-balls, too, but able to fly and stay with mom. What unfolded next was heaven on earth, for the mom and other two little ones, spent the next hour jumping from branch to branch, with mom talking up a storm the whole time, as if she along with the baby siblings were trying to teach the helpless baby how to fly, or how to take that first step to freedom, and just like that, the little one made a few jumps with the others, and away the family went.

I'll never forget it.
 

Gary O'

Well-known Member
Location
Oregon
Our first year at the cabin taught us a lot

Like big windows fool most wild birds into cruising thru the cabin

This one took out a few avian friends before my lady draped a crocheted something in it

CABIN FRONT.jpg

We'd hear a 'bonk' and sure enough, another one bit the dust

Except the last time

We had a flock of nutcrackers swoop in and stay for a few days
They were mostly bullies
Crowded out my little guys
Hogged the feeders

One took if upon hisself to fly thru that octagon window
Plopped on the ground
Thought it was another goner
Got the shovel
Turns out, it was just stunned
Set him on the picnic table and kinda petted/stroked him for a few minutes
He tried to walk, fell, tried again
I put him on a stump, by hisself
Watched







Within 20-30 minutes, he gathered himself and flew away
A bit cockeyed flight, but he was flying
Had a limp
Came back for several days

Then, they just all flew away

Now we have the crocheted 'drape'
Still gives light, but not so deadly or tempting
vfji3DU.jpg

octogon window.jpg
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
Our first year at the cabin taught us a lot

Like big windows fool most wild birds into cruising thru the cabin

This one took out a few avian friends before my lady draped a crocheted something in it

View attachment 103606

We'd hear a 'bonk' and sure enough, another one bit the dust

Except the last time

We had a flock of nutcrackers swoop in and stay for a few days
They were mostly bullies
Crowded out my little guys
Hogged the feeders

One took if upon hisself to fly thru that octagon window
Plopped on the ground
Thought it was another goner
Got the shovel
Turns out, it was just stunned
Set him on the picnic table and kinda petted/stroked him for a few minutes
He tried to walk, fell, tried again
I put him on a stump, by hisself
Watched







Within 20-30 minutes, he gathered himself and flew away
A bit cockeyed flight, but he was flying
Had a limp
Came back for several days

Then, they just all flew away

Now we have the crocheted 'drape'
Still gives light, but not so deadly or tempting
View attachment 103608

View attachment 103607
Do hope the Nutcracker recovered fully.

We've had a few American Robins fly into windows, so over the course of summer we lower the window coverings first thing in the morning, and that's been a game-changer. Haven't had a window incident since.

I was listening to a great radio broadcast last year, where a company has come up with a special thin material with a honeycomb-like pattern, and like a screen of sorts, material is affixed to the outer surface of large office windows, eliminating the glare and reflection that all too often confuses birds into flying into, and so far the product has been an incredible success.

I like what you and your wife have done with the crocheted work in the window.
 

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