My garden efforts

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
I'm amazed......2 of the butternut squash are almost 12 inches long !!!!!!!!!!
You'll have to trust me on this......can't hold the leaves back and take a pic at the same time.
Think i did the right thing by cutting some of the newer vine runners back.....the quash that was already there are growing better i think.
 
2 of the butternut squash are almost 12 inches long !!!!!!!!!!
I envy you! I really like squash, but the "butternut" squash I planted this year turned out to be pumpkins... Make good jack-o-lanterns I guess.

By the end of the season local farmers usually have way too many squash and practically give them away at the local stands. Last year we got enough to store in the garage and last half the winter. Was hoping to get some of my own this year, but no such luck.
 

Shero

Senior Member
I'm amazed......2 of the butternut squash are almost 12 inches long !!!!!!!!!!
You'll have to trust me on this......can't hold the leaves back and take a pic at the same time.
Think i did the right thing by cutting some of the newer vine runners back.....the quash that was already there are growing better i think.

You have green fingers for sure! The longest one I have seen is about 7". May I have one of yours please, I love them baked and stuffed with minced meat:)
 

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
I envy you! I really like squash, but the "butternut" squash I planted this year turned out to be pumpkins... Make good jack-o-lanterns I guess.

By the end of the season local farmers usually have way too many squash and practically give them away at the local stands. Last year we got enough to store in the garage and last half the winter. Was hoping to get some of my own this year, but no such luck.
I'm a little slow sometimes......what do you mean when you said your squash turned into pumpkins. πŸ€ͺπŸ˜œπŸ™ƒ
At the farmers markets here i've never seen any spaghetti, butternut or acorn squash.....wonder why.....maybe our season's too short.
By the time they're ready, the markets have pretty much quit.
In the stores, they're 2.00 lb......and small.
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA

Kabocha
 
what do you mean when you said your squash turned into pumpkins
I assume they were mislabeled. Planted smallish plants, at the stage you can't tell the difference. The kids will enjoy making jack-o-lanterns.

I am surprised your season is shorter than ours, I know we are south of you, but at an elevation of 4,400 ft. We get our first frost some time in October, and our last one in May.
 

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
I assume they were mislabeled. Planted smallish plants, at the stage you can't tell the difference. The kids will enjoy making jack-o-lanterns.

I am surprised your season is shorter than ours, I know we are south of you, but at an elevation of 4,400 ft. We get our first frost some time in October, and our last one in May.
Our first frost can be as early as now.....i remember covering things starting about now when i was on the farm.....and often had frost at the latest, middle of June. But that hasn't happened in the last few years....but definitely end of May.
 

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
They're back !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Had my backyard almost dandelion free.....can't use spray because of the guys.....before we started getting rain.
I swear......everyone one that i dug out, 3 more came in its place.......back to digging.
 

Aneeda72

Well-known Member
They're back !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Had my backyard almost dandelion free.....can't use spray because of the guys.....before we started getting rain.
I swear......everyone one that i dug out, 3 more came in its place.......back to digging.
I understand that you can EAT dandelions. Have you ever tried them? Just consider them part of your garden πŸ˜³πŸ˜‚
 

Aneeda72

Well-known Member
Been there.....done that.....😝😝😝
Besides.......hard to tell the ones that haven't been pied on.
True, but I can assure you that the produce you buy in the stores has been peed on, chewed on, and walked on by a large variety of animals and insects. Actually, baby insects have been conceived on that produce as well.

Why even in your carefully tended, loved garden flies, bees, and other insects are doing the nasty. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
 

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
Dandelions are a crucial source of food in the spring for bees when they first come out. Here in BC we are asked not to get rid of them until mid May when other sources of food are more readily available. Our wild bee population in this country is crashing so any help we can give is crucial. Yes, I know dandelions are a pain, though.
The bee population here is suffering very badly as well.
 

Tommy

Senior Member
Location
New Hampshire
Before retiring, we had a LAWN. Thick, green, uniform bluegrass turf is attractive but maintaining it is a major undertaking. Feeding, weeding, thatching, mowing, trimming, raking, and overseeding all take a lot of time and money. After our move to rural acreage we resolved to have a YARD.

By our definition, a yard consists of whatever grows there as long as it's green and/or attractive. Our yard includes several types of grass, clover, mosses, DANDELIONS, hawkweed (orange & yellow), self heal, and various other small, nondescript flowering and non-flowering plants. It's mowed and trimmed regularly and the rare weak spot gets top dressed with loam and reseeded with perennial rye grass. That's about all.

Our yard attracts a lot of local fauna ... birds, bees, and butterflies as well as the larger furry creatures. You can drive on a yard. We love our yard and don't miss the lawn a bit. :D
 

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
I don't know what i will eat when the garden is finished......might starve.
These are tomatoes from the Cobra plant.....this is the plant that i have in a 4x4ft raised bed which grow beyond the space....pic in earlier posts.IMG_1114.jpeg Very meaty, few seeds... pic doesn't do them justice. I will be getting this kind again. Got 1 plant.....tonnes of yield. $10 for one plant. Very low acid.
 

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
One of my projects for this winter.....
Going to make a bumble bee costume for myself....with pockets for my little paint brushes and q-tips and a sound track of bee buzzing.

Making a list of flowers i want to plant to attract hummingbirds and bees.
 

Lee

Senior Member
Location
Chatham, Ontario
Micka, earlier you mentioned using a garbage container for composting. That works but so does just starting it on the ground if you are only using plant materials for compost, easier to turn to. One drawback, snakes will like to snuggle in it in the cold weather.....ask me how I know.
 

MickaC

Well-known Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
Micka, earlier you mentioned using a garbage container for composting. That works but so does just starting it on the ground if you are only using plant materials for compost, easier to turn to. One drawback, snakes will like to snuggle in it in the cold weather.....ask me how I know.
I'm really on the fence with this composting thing, Lee.
SNAKES !!!!!!!!!
I know i don't think i want one in the main backyard, especially the ground one.......I can imagine what i may attract, mice, snakes,endless bugs, wasps, yellow jacket .....also the smell......would have to fence it off from my guys.
That's probably why i'm searching in composing in a garden bin.
I do have space on the east side over the fence in the back....Size of a 3 car garage.....have a 10 x 16 shed there......not sure if the neighbours would appreciate an open one.....could build a bin type one with a front that can open.
Seems to me containers may be less odor?........maybe not as many bugs swarming around them.
Then there's Winter......would want be able to get it.....pretty much kitchen waste.
Guess i'll so more time on the fence till a light bulb come on
 


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