Need new carpet!

Colleen

Active member
Joined
Apr 23, 2014
Location
Arizona
Buying carpet these days is very confusing...and very expensive, and I would like some opinions on the best way to pay for it.

We don't have a huge house any more, thank goodness, but to replace the original carpet that was installed when it was built 20 years ago is going to be around $4,000. This is not the cheapest carpet but it's not top of the line either. We've had 2 different local carpet installers come out and measure and give us prices.

What I'd like to know is.....should we take that money out of savings, or finance with 0% interest for 24 months, or does this qualify as home improvement for a home equity loan (and is it worth it to do that???) ?

Thanks.
 

Geezerette

Active member
Joined
Feb 14, 2014
About the only thing that comes to mind for me is since they will finance with 0 interest for 24 months, I'd ask them if they would be willing to give a discount on the $4000 estimate for paying cash up front - assuming this is a reputable dealer you are talking to. I don't know anything about home equity loans but I always thought they were for something permanent, not subject to wear & tear like carpet.
 

Colleen

Active member
Joined
Apr 23, 2014
Location
Arizona
Original Poster
About the only thing that comes to mind for me is since they will finance with 0 interest for 24 months, I'd ask them if they would be willing to give a discount on the $4000 estimate for paying cash up front - assuming this is a reputable dealer you are talking to. I don't know anything about home equity loans but I always thought they were for something permanent, not subject to wear & tear like carpet.
I forgot to add that we also want to update the fireplace, which will be around $1,000.
 

fmdog44

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Location
Houston, Texas
Buying carpet these days is very confusing...and very expensive, and I would like some opinions on the best way to pay for it.

We don't have a huge house any more, thank goodness, but to replace the original carpet that was installed when it was built 20 years ago is going to be around $4,000. This is not the cheapest carpet but it's not top of the line either. We've had 2 different local carpet installers come out and measure and give us prices.

What I'd like to know is.....should we take that money out of savings, or finance with 0% interest for 24 months, or does this qualify as home improvement for a home equity loan (and is it worth it to do that???) ?

Thanks.
Negotiate on the price. I went from a cost of $3,600 to $2,000 when I called the business and told them I changed my mind because I got a better deal after the sales person left. I said I could get it done for $2,500 they responded we will do it for 2,000.
 

Colleen

Active member
Joined
Apr 23, 2014
Location
Arizona
Original Poster
Negotiate on the price. I went from a cost of $3,600 to $2,000 when I called the business and told them I changed my mind because I got a better deal after the sales person left. I said I could get it done for $2,500 they responded we will do it for 2,000.
Will you come and negotiate for me??? :)
 

JimW

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Location
Mass
First negotiate your best price.

As long as the the total amount being paid for the 0% interest is the same as if you paid in full after the job was done, I would opt for the 0% interest payments. The way I look at it is that's free money to play with while your savings is hopefully earning interest somewhere else. Even if your money isn't earning any interest you'll still have that money available if you need it.

If you can get a cheaper price on the job for paying cash in full and you can afford to do so, you'll need to weigh the cash savings against whatever interest your money would make in the bank for two years to see which option is better.
 

Colleen

Active member
Joined
Apr 23, 2014
Location
Arizona
Original Poster
First negotiate your best price.

As long as the the total amount being paid for the 0% interest is the same as if you paid in full after the job was done, I would opt for the 0% interest payments. The way I look at it is that's free money to play with while your savings is hopefully earning interest somewhere else. Even if your money isn't earning any interest you'll still have that money available if you need it.

If you can get a cheaper price on the job for paying cash in full and you can afford to do so, you'll need to weigh the cash savings against whatever interest your money would make in the bank for two years to see which option is better.
Thanks :) Yes, savings is earning 2%+ :)
 


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