New frying pans

applecruncher

Well-known member
Location
Ohio USA
Well, did you expect me to use my old ones with that brand new stove? Nooooooo!.😜

Ordered a set of 3 Tramontina non-stick fry pans ( 8, 10, 12") from Walmart. Placed order Saturday night and they came today. Very nice, and great price.

Waiting on a set of burner covers to wrap that project up. (those really help with grease, dust, and also to set pans on for brief periods)

A couple of my frying pans are ready for the grave. My other cookware is still in good shape (sauce pan, chili pot, etc).

I don't have a cast iron skillet, although I know many cooks swear by them. Might get one someday.

I have an Orgreenic non-stick - bought it 3 yrs ago, still looks new and I use it quite a bit. Love it.
 

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Ruth n Jersey

Well-known member
They have improved the non stick pans so much since they first hit the market. I have a couple. We use one smaller one for our morning eggs.They slide right out. I also have an old cast iron pan which I think browns better than the non stick. I hope you have good luck with the burner covers. They do everything you mentioned. Soon after I got mine I turned my stove on in a hurry and forgot they were there. They weren't very pretty after that.
 

treeguy64

Hari Om, y'all!
Location
Austin, TX.
Well.......I hate to rain on anyone's parade, but......

The only cookware pieces anyone should use are high-quality, expertly crafted, stainless steel pots and pans.

If you do the research, online, and dig deep enough, you will find that all of those coated, non-stick cookware pieces definitely fail, over time. I also question the advisability of ingesting micro particles of chemical compounds once those pans start shedding the same.

Here's a pic, taken just now, of my twelve year old saute/frying pan:



20191010_074615.jpg
 

fmdog44

Well-known member
Location
Houston, Texas
Cast iron skillets are over rated and a pain the butt. They don't have anything over other pans when it comes to tastes and are not worth all the BS in keeping them stored. Anyone ever notice the skillets they use on food shows or at food places where you can see the cooks at work?
 

treeguy64

Hari Om, y'all!
Location
Austin, TX.
Cast iron skillets are over rated and a pain the butt. They don't have anything over other pans when it comes to tastes and are not worth all the BS in keeping them stored. Anyone ever notice the skillets they use on food shows or at food places where you can see the cooks at work?
I beg to (strongly) differ. Cast iron skillets are the gold standard, for me, when it comes to making pancakes, vegan bacon, hash browns, grilled cheese sandwiches and other gastronomical delights. The iron absorbs flavors, aging to perfection, as time goes by. I don't worry about storing or cleaning. My cast iron skillet stays on my stove, always, right behind my stainless steel saute pan. I rarely need to rinse it. I simply spray a little oil on it, wipe it with a smooth towel, and it's ready for the next dish to be cooked on it.

Now, every ten years, or so, if I notice uneven cooking, I take the skillet outside, rev up my drill, with a steel fiber head on it, and grind the carbon buildup down to metal. Then, it's time to season it, and, once again, start the buildup up of all the good things that make it my go-to skillet
 
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retiredtraveler

Well-known member
I beg to (strongly) differ. Cast iron skillets are the gold standard, for me, when it comes to making pancakes, vegan bacon, hash browns, grilled cheese sandwiches and other gastronomical delights. The iron absorbs flavors, aging to perfection, as time goes by. I don't worry about storing or cleaning.... I rarely need to rinse it. I simply spray a little oil on it, wipe it with a smooth towel, and it's ready for the next dish to be cooked on it.
Yup!
I use a combo of pouring some oil into the pan and throwing on some salt and rubbing for 15 seconds to get imbedded food out.
 

JB in SC

Active member
Location
Upstate
Cast iron, when properly seasoned over a couple of generations, cooks many things extremely well. All the bad foods we love in the South taste better cooked in cast, cornbread, fried chicken, bacon, country ham....

We have a few cast iron skillets passed down three generations.

Working chefs (not cooks) use carbon steel frying and sauté pans (French made are usually the best). They have to be seasoned too.
 

PVC

Well-known member
Location
Southern AZ
Well.......I hate to rain on anyone's parade, but......

The only cookware pieces anyone should use are high-quality, expertly crafted, stainless steel pots and pans.

If you do the research, online, and dig deep enough, you will find that all of those coated, non-stick cookware pieces definitely fail, over time. I also question the advisability of ingesting micro particles of chemical compounds once those pans start shedding the same.

Here's a pic, taken just now, of my twelve year old saute/frying pan:



View attachment 77924
TreeGuy, what brand is your frying pan (tramontina)? I notice it has a metal handle, can you use it in the oven? Does food stick?
 

treeguy64

Hari Om, y'all!
Location
Austin, TX.
JB in SC said: "Working chefs (not cooks) use carbon steel frying and sauté pans (French made are usually the best). They have to be seasoned too."

I much prefer my stainless steel saute pan, a costly piece, over the cheaper carbon steel pans I used in restaurants, in my cheffing days. Just a personal choice. I am well aware that carbon steel pans can be costly, as well, if one wants to look for the same. In restaurants that I cheffed at, the pans were bought, wholesale, in quantity, from restaurant supply companies. They were, around, $15 apiece.
 
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treeguy64

Hari Om, y'all!
Location
Austin, TX.
TreeGuy, what brand is your frying pan (tramontina)? I notice it has a metal handle, can you use it in the oven? Does food stick?
Calphalon Classic Stainless Steel 12-In. Fry Pan With Cover
SKU: 1891247
This is not the exact skillet I have, according to the model number on mine. Mine has been discontinued. This is the closest to it, though.
NOTHING ever sticks to my skillet, because I know the tricks: Make sure your pan is hot enough, just starting to smoke the oil, before you throw in your veggies and tofu. Flip at the right rate, allowing each side to get done, in the process. I have, grudgingly, because I don't like the smell, cooked Janet some killer omelets, in the past. Never had a single one stick. This pan is rated as oven and broiler-safe.
 

StarSong

Well-known member
Location
Los Angeles
Never did get into cast iron pots or pans, probably because my mother, an excellent cook, used meals using Revere Ware from her marriage in 1942 until she stopped cooking in around 2012.

I use stainless steel pots that have the cap base, but the pans get almost no use because they need a heavy hand with oil or virtually everything sticks.

My frying pans are mostly T-fal clad and I replace them every year or two.
 
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PVC

Well-known member
Location
Southern AZ
Never did get into cast iron pots or pans, probably because my mother, an excellent cook, used meals using Revere Ware from her marriage in 1942 until she stopped cooking in around 2012.

I use stainless steel pots that have the cap base, but the pans get almost no use because they need a heavy hand with oil or virtually everything sticks.

My frying pans are mostly T-fal clad and I replace them every year or two.
I have used Revere for almost all my adult life and still have one set. I really like them except some times they have a colorful stain on the inside bottom, but now I use Barkeeper's Friend and the stain goes away.
 

Capt Lightning

Well-known member
I use German "Fissler" pots and pans. The pans are stainless steel with an encapsulated aluminium or copper base. The frying pans are aluminium alloy with a black non-stick coating. Not cheap, but excellent. Some cheaper pans I tried warped when heated and wouldn't sit flat on my ceramic hob. The Fissler ones have a perfectly flat machined base that work on my hob.
 

PVC

Well-known member
Location
Southern AZ
My frying pans are stainless steel with encapsulated copper in the bottom. I use one small, non stick pan for an egg or one hamburger patty which is replaced each year.
What brand? My Revere are stainless steel with a copper bottom and also have a couple of sauce pans with encapsulated bottom (also Revere).
 

RadishRose

Well-known member
Location
Connecticut USA
What brand? My Revere are stainless steel with a copper bottom and also have a couple of sauce pans with encapsulated bottom (also Revere).
@PVC I fondly remember the old Revereware. I used a set of them for many years.

I have a Cuisinart large chef pan and a 10" fry-pan. Also a Wolfgang Puck 10" fry-pay which is my favorite.

The little non-stick (my egg pan) I don't know what it is... They always carry them at Job Lots.
 
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PVC

Well-known member
Location
Southern AZ
@PVC I have a Cuisinart large chef pan and a 10" fry-pan. Also a Wolfgang Puck 10" fry-pay which is my favorite. The little non-stick (my egg pan) I don't know what it is... They always carry them at Job Lots.
I checked out the Wolfgang Puck at Amazon and they do not carry it, but found it here:

Since it's dark on the inside and nonstick, does it have to be replaced every couple years? It's on the expensive side (for me) but I have some old nonstick frypans that I would like to get rid of. I have never trusted nonstick pans.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This cookware is oven safe in an oven of up to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. ... Consumers report that Wolfgang Puck Cookware is a great value for the price, is extremely durable and is easy to use. Most customers also love the fact that this cookware is dishwasher safe and can be used with metal utensils.
 


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