NO is one of the most powerful words in the English language

Jace

Senior Member
It's such a tiny little word. It takes up so little space on the page,
it hardly seems mentioning...

But...in life....it's a power of superhero proportions.
For women, it's your Wonder-woman bracelets, your ultimate superpower.

Like all superpowers, one has to understand it, develop it and learn to "weild it"
with confidence.


Are you able to say NO!

(You ,too, Guys)
 

Jace

Senior Member
My 2¢...It depends..sometimes..I can give a definite NO immediately
@ the implant thread...that was a "no-brainer"..

Then other times..it's "let me think about it"...before..I might make a mistake..either way.

Do you make "snap decisions"?
 

Ruthanne

SF VIP
Location
Midwest
My 2¢...It depends..sometimes..I can give a definite NO immediately
@ the implant thread...that was a "no-brainer"..

Then other times..it's "let me think about it"...before..I might make a mistake..either way.

Do you make "snap decisions"?
No I don't make snap decisions on most things but some things are just a definite "no" for me. The question was are you able to say no...so I answered it. :D 🥀
 

Packerjohn

Packerjohn
Location
Canada
I have been saying no for years. No to illegal drugs, no to Christmas shopping, no to 15 minute shopping, no to buying big gas drinking 4X4 trucks, no to cable TV, no to smartphones, no to telephone con artists and no to Keeping up with the Jones (who have left the city years ago).

Saying "yes" to situations where you know you should have said "no" can cause a lot of stress. If you are retired you don't need nor want that stress. It has been proven that in certain situations, "Stress Kills." It seems to me that learning to say no is a good investment in living to a ripe old age.
 
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Fyrefox

Token fox furry
Learning to say “no” was for me a difficult skill to acquire, but one that was quite empowering. I was a human doormat for many years, nay decades, both for family and for others. Churches, charities, and organizations can also be notorious for imposing unwanted burdens upon compliant souls, and such impositions once accepted tend to lead to more, and eventually to exhaustion and burnout.

Here’s a worthwhile correlation to “no;” lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part. Also, I am not obligated to be miserable in order to make you happy…
 

feywon

Senior Member
Yes and we learn to use it at such a very early age. My great granddaughter just recently turned 2 and she knows it very well. She uses it quite forcefully at times as well.
Very small children often use no frequently and forcefully because thst is how they hear it from adults. When i was raising mine, because of experience when caring for young cousins and then my brother (i am 16 yrs his senior) i used 'no' sparingly.

But that doesn't mean i let them do anything/everything they wsnted. I just used different words and sometimes distracted or redirected them. If they were about to get into somthing they shouldn't i might say 'Stop!' Or 'Don't ____'.

With my twins it was funny because one obeyed moving away, closing a drawer or container. The other one you could see him weighing his options, calculating what he could manage to do before i could get to him to stop him. Daughter was clever enough to to follow most instructions but also tk do certsin things out of sight. Also smart enough to learn from experience why i said not to do certain things.

But i also taught them they could say 'No!' or 'Stop!' If adults were forcing affection or tickling them. And that i would back them up, enforce their no in those situations.
 

feywon

Senior Member
Here’s a worthwhile correlation to “no;” lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part. Also, I am not obligated to be miserable in order to make you happy…
The point is that 'No.' Is a complete sentence on its own in most situations. When someone, stranger or family/friend makes a request we can't agree to do, we don't have to explain why not. Doing so is often perceived as an invitation for them to counter our reasons, to cajole or convince us. A simple no (or 'No, thank you.') is direct and clear, and does not leave door open for debate.

The two statements you suggest not only invite debate as much as an explanation that we '...have something else to do.' but they sound accusatory. While i've certainly thought both of them to myself and might say them or something similar to someone who frequently made demands on my time/energy and was getting pushy about the current request, i would not attach them to my initial no .
 

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