Nobody said, " Thank you".

One of the things that kind of grated on me, was when I was discharged from the Navy, there was no "thank you" ceremony. On the day of my discharge, i got up, got into my civies, and went to this window. A guy gave me my DD 214, and closed the window. That was it, I was out of the Navy. Nobody even said I could go, and after 4 years in the Navy, you got accustomed to having someone tell you what to do. I remember my induction ceremony. They chained the doors, so we couldn't run away, but at least it WAS a ceremony. And when I think of all the petty nonsense with Navy rituals, I put up with through 4 years, they couldn't have some guy say, "thank you", when you were going out the door.,
That was in 1972, and it still bothers me.
 

Don't blame you. One of my sons did 20 yrs, retiring in 2014. The Navy itself didn't do a 'ceremony' but his CO recommended and helped organize a small one because he realized rituals important especially. His CO, his chaplain and some his comrades attended. He flew daughter and i out for it.


And thank you for your service, it was a rough time to be in service whether one got sent to Nam or not.
 

squatting dog

Well-known Member
It used to bother me, but, I think I've gotten over it. When my time was up, they plucked me out of a firebase somewhere in the iron triangle and flew me direct to Da Nang where I took a commercial flight home. Still in my jungle fatigues. Got to Oakland, grabbed a cab to San Francisco and nabbed a flight back to NY. pounded on the door of my friends apartment and scared the heck out of him. (he told me later it looked like I had jumped out of the 6 o'clock news on tv). We headed for the nearest bar, drank a bit, and then proceeded to pull my car out of storage. Took off for New England right away, (maybe not the smartest thing seeing how we had boozed up a might). Anyway, less than 7 hours later, they were pulling us out of my wrecked car and taking us to the hospital. I did however get a "welcome home" from the state trooper working the scene. (that's something I guess)
It wasn't until much later that I discovered that I was supposed to stay in Oakland and be de-briefed and given dress greens.
 

HarryHawk

Rev. Harry
Location
Michigan
My dad was a WWII veteran. The one thing he wanted when he passed was a military honor guard at the cemetery. There was a local veterans group who was originally supposed to provide a ceremony. They called as we were leaving the church after the funeral to tell us they would not be able to make the service.

I was upset and wanted to see if there was some way to grant my father his dying wish. I ended up contacting the Department of Navy. I told my story, the reply was -- "The Navy takes care of it's own."

They asked me when and where and said they would take care of it. They did.

HonorGuard.jpg
 

Don M.

Well-known Member
Location
central Missouri
I finished my career in the USAF on the day after Christmas in 1967, in Thailand. I stayed on base an extra day to watch the Bob Hope Christmas show, then flew back to the States, the next day. I got my official papers at Travis AFB, and was given a ride to the San Francisco airport to begin my "civilian" career. I, too, don't recall any "thanks".
 

fmdog44

Well-known Member
Location
Houston, Texas
The same applies to long term employment. I never wanted anything from a company. When I retired I sent out an email and was surprised when a few guys came in to my office. I cleaned out my desk and loaded up the truck and left. Adios.
 

Pecos

Well-known Member
Location
South Carolina
I spent 31 years in the Navy and retired as an 0-5 Commander after working my way up from E-1.

After reading all of these previous comments and reflecting a bit, I will certainly agree that the whole process was sloppy. I have seen Commands where everyone who was getting out were given appointments to talk to the Skipper before they left. I have seen other Commands where this little step and the "Thank You" it included was just ignored. Often it was just passed on down to a Division Officer, and often a Sailor's buddies just had a few drinks with him the night before.

The process was a bit formalized when it came to retirements, but I have seen so many instances where the individual being retired simply did not want a formal retirement ceremony and chose to simply stop by the Skipper's Officer to receive their final Awards and the Presidential Letter thanking them for their service. My own retirement ceremony was limited to about 100 people and was formal but well-executed. I have seen a couple that were huge and very elaborate. We had a Marine Medal of Honor retire in Hawaii, and that was simply spectacular.

Burial ceremonies are generally formal and pretty well done. When my step-father (WWII Vet) was interned in ElPaso, I was very pleased with the way the Navy executed the ceremony in the National Cemetery. It bothers me to read that so many of you were disrespected when your service came to an end.

I suppose that I may be one of the few Senior Officers here, and so, I do apologize to each of you that this kind treatment happened. It should not have been that way. In my opinion it was sloppy leadership at the individual Command level.
 
I signed up for four years and did them all on the same ship. was seperated and reupped, volunteered for 'nam' did a tour on shore duty and ended on guam. As a radioman I was in close contact to occifers, plenty of yessirs. got an education I would not have otherwise, saw places this ol boy from the hills would never have seen. got no thank you, didnt expect one. But I got my VA medical and that was worth it all!!!!!!!!!
 
One of the things that kind of grated on me, was when I was discharged from the Navy, there was no "thank you" ceremony. On the day of my discharge, i got up, got into my civies, and went to this window. A guy gave me my DD 214, and closed the window. That was it, I was out of the Navy. Nobody even said I could go, and after 4 years in the Navy, you got accustomed to having someone tell you what to do. I remember my induction ceremony. They chained the doors, so we couldn't run away, but at least it WAS a ceremony. And when I think of all the petty nonsense with Navy rituals, I put up with through 4 years, they couldn't have some guy say, "thank you", when you were going out the door.,
That was in 1972, and it still bothers me.
Someone certainly should have, so here is my much belated THANK YOU!

Service people accept the risk of violence and death in a way few of us non-veterans do. This is true no matter what the service actually is, you are always on call. You deserve our thanks for that. Now you have mine!
 

Remy

Senior Member
Location
California, USA
The same applies to long term employment. I never wanted anything from a company. When I retired I sent out an email and was surprised when a few guys came in to my office. I cleaned out my desk and loaded up the truck and left. Adios.
I work for a corporation. I'm just glad when I have a job everyday I go there.
 

Tommy

Senior Member
Location
New Hampshire
I got out in 1972 as well, fuzzybuddy. No "Thank You", but then again I didn't really expect one.

I had a place on shore and on my last day the ship was leaving Norfolk on a deployment. I got up early, drove to the ship, picked up my gear and then my separation packet from Personnel. The ship was ready to leave as I ran for the quarterdeck as fast as I could, carrying a full sea bag and my big yellow envelope. The gangway was already hooked up to the the crane and they were about to hoist it away. I just barely made it off.

Another 30 seconds and they would have had to fly me off ... when (or if) they got around to it. 🤪
 
Just to be specific, the ones whom I wished to say 'thank you'" was the US Navy, not civilians. When I was inducted into the Navy, there was a ceremony. There was an officer, we raised our right hands, and we swore an oath. All through my four years, I had to put up with nit picky nonsense, but then I was asked for "over and beyond" for the good of the Navy. This wasn't a big deal, I was never in harms way. There was a lot of gung ho, Navy! I'm very proud of my service as a Corpsman, I can honestly say, I gave it my best. My last day in the US Navy was when a guy gave me a piece of paper, and shut the window. That was it. There was no "Retirement Ceremony" as for officers. I didn't even know I was discharged. The impression I got was that they were done with me, and the hell with me.
 
@fuzzbuddy said in part: "Just to be specific, the ones whom I wished to say 'thank you'" was the US Navy, not civilians."

i come from a family that has served in various military branches since WWI (my Welsh Grandpa was a Navy man), so even tho i didn't think we belonged in Nam i never disrespected the service personnel, And i've been thanking them for decades now when i meet them. But VIetnam vets, my generation, they got one of the rawest deals because a lot of citizens were awful to them and i know the quality of VA services for various after effects of being there often depended on where you were located,
 
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Knight

Well-known Member
I didn't expect anything when joining the Navy & nothing when I got out . When I got out I was thankful for the variety of experiences that helped me when I returned to civilian life. Every once in awhile I reflect on my time in the Navy. A lot of really great times were had.
 

squatting dog

Well-known Member
I didn't expect a "thank you", I also didn't expect to be yelled at and accused of being a 'baby killer'. I'm over it, don't care.

Yesterday I attended a funeral at the Veteran's cemetery in Riverside,Ca. Another brother veteran laid to rest. Very emotional.
We're going fast. :cry: Tried riding with the Patriot Guard for a bit. Too stressful and sad, started the demons in my head again... Had to stop. :(
 


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