Nobody said, " Thank you".

terry123

Well-known Member
Location
Houston, Tx.
drafted, served, didn't expect a thank you. if you served your country for a thank you, you served for the wrong reason. I will do MY duty to the best of my ability.
Thats what my dad said. He was glad to serve his Country and never expected anything else. His military service was very moving and to this day I get teary eyed when I hear "Taps".
 

OneEyedDiva

Well-known Member
Location
New Jersey
I think it's 🤬 (well..I"ll use a nicer term)...a damned shame that veterans who have served this country get treated so shabbily! I understand why you feel the way you do. Thank you for your service Fuzzbuddy.
 

Ruthanne

SF VIP
Location
Midwest
My father served in the Army in World War II and wounded badly.

Of course I hadn't been born yet when he received The Purple Heart award for his being wounded in the line of duty. That was an honor and a thankyou I suppose.

I don't know if he got thanks from anyone.

He was given a military ceremony which I and my siblings attended. I didn't know they were going to give him that ceremony but it was very nice and gave me a good feeling. He would have liked it a lot.
 

Lizzie00

😎
Location
Down South
No thanks for your service, just $600 and a look that said…Don’t let the door hit you in the ass on your out. Fort Ord, 1958.
No recollection of Uncle Sam handing out $600 when i hit the road in 1974 BUT in return for a mere 2-years service, he put me thru 4 years of school as well as extending eligibility for one of those oh-so-sweet zero down VA home loans. Overall a superb reward for a couple years of active duty so I didn’t feel remotely slighted by the lack of fanfare upon my end of active service….then again tho I was out the door so quick I wouldn’t have heard it even if someone had said thanks😉
 

Pappy

Living the Dream
No recollection of Uncle Sam handing out $600 when i hit the road in 1974 BUT in return for a mere 2-years service, he put me thru 4 years of school as well as extending eligibility for one of those oh-so-sweet zero down VA home loans. Overall a superb reward for a couple years of active duty so I didn’t feel remotely slighted by the lack of fanfare upon my end of active service….then again tho I was out the door so quick I wouldn’t have heard it even if someone had said thanks😉
Lizzie: the $600 was family travel pay from CA to NY. Had much more fun in the 2 weeks reserves trips to Fort Drum. Party time and decent food.
 
One of the things that kind of grated on me, was when I was discharged from the Navy, there was no "thank you" ceremony. On the day of my discharge, i got up, got into my civies, and went to this window. A guy gave me my DD 214, and closed the window. That was it, I was out of the Navy. Nobody even said I could go, and after 4 years in the Navy, you got accustomed to having someone tell you what to do. I remember my induction ceremony. They chained the doors, so we couldn't run away, but at least it WAS a ceremony. And when I think of all the petty nonsense with Navy rituals, I put up with through 4 years, they couldn't have some guy say, "thank you", when you were going out the door.,
That was in 1972, and it still bothers me.
If you had been an Officer, things may have been different upon your discharge.
 

LoneRogue

New Member
I didn't expect a "thank you", I also didn't expect to be yelled at and accused of being a 'baby killer'. I'm over it, don't care.

Yesterday I attended a funeral at the Veteran's cemetery in Riverside,Ca. Another brother veteran laid to rest. Very emotional.
A "Thank you"? We got stood at attention and chewing out for talking to loudly by a woman 2nd lieutenant while waiting to get our final papers and be citizens again. It pissed me off but later I came to feel it was just right to give me a fitting feeling about the draft.
 

horseless carriage

Senior Member
That was in 1972, and it still bothers me.
Take heart that although people take the armed forces for granted, most know the personal cost that seamen, marines, airmen and soldiers are prepared to give. In civilian life a simple way for anyone to pay tribute to the Armed Forces community for their hard work, dedication and efforts to and keep the community safe in their own country and across the globe, is to donate to the annual appeal for Veterans Day or as we call it, Poppy day. The amount collected is both appreciated and an acknowledgement of the often self-sacrifice given. Governments might take you for granted, the populace does not.
 
Thank you, horseless carriage. When I was inducted into the Navy, there was a small ceremony. On my last day in the Navy, we lined up by a window. As we passed by, the clerk gave us a piece of paper, then they closed the window. And that was it, I was no longer in the US Navy. Nobody even told us what that paper was- our discharge.
 

fmdog44

Well-known Member
Location
Houston, Texas
Now we hear "Thank you for your service" spoken so ingenuously by so many it is as bad as spitting on Viet Nam vets. To me, it is in part because our vets keep being sent to wars we don't win while forever altering their lives for the worst.
 

Nathan

Senior Member
Now we hear "Thank you for your service" spoken so ingenuously by so many it is as bad as spitting on Viet Nam vets. To me, it is in part because our vets keep being sent to wars we don't win while forever altering their lives for the worst.
I agree with you, although there has been occasion when someone saying to me "Thank you for your service" invoked an involuntary emotion from down deep.
 

Knight

Well-known Member
I was fortunate enough to supervise an ex marine. A few years before becoming his supervisor we worked together on many occasions. We got along great. Not only our age similarity but both having served during the Viet Nam era. Being on land he had really horrible exposer to death. He showed me pictures he had of fellow marines laid out with body parts missing.

It wasn't until his death recently that I learned he had been awarded 3 purple hearts for his action to save as many of his unit as he could. As I look back to the times we worked together I never noticed any thing other than his willingness to do as good a job as possible. I think there are people in this world that make our lives richer for knowing them.
 

Lizzie00

😎
Location
Down South
I was fortunate enough to supervise an ex marine. A few years before becoming his supervisor we worked together on many occasions. We got along great. Not only our age similarity but both having served during the Viet Nam era. Being on land he had really horrible exposer to death. He showed me pictures he had of fellow marines laid out with body parts missing.

It wasn't until his death recently that I learned he had been awarded 3 purple hearts for his action to save as many of his unit as he could. As I look back to the times we worked together I never noticed any thing other than his willingness to do as good a job as possible. I think there are people in this world that make our lives richer for knowing them.
One of America’s finest. A real hero.
 

john19485

Member
Location
Roy, Utah
I was just getting up from the hospital bed , one of the guys handed me orders from Washington D.C., I was to report to my home in Utah to await further orders, I knew I had orders that were on hold, to go back to Vietnam, I checked out, Doctor told me to go home , to rest up for six months, and I would get over it, and went to the LA. Airport , I was home in two hours, took me awhile to get my like back together, nothing has ever been the same, but I sucked it up, I'm 73 now, tonight when I go back to sleep, it will be 1968, I will be back in Vietnam, just the way it is folks. God Bless You All, Wecome Home!!me at hill.jpg
 


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