Polish Pierogi (piroshki)

Liberty

Senior Member
Location
Texas
Many many years ago, when we lived in Cleveland, Ohio, the West Side Market there is gigantic and has been a gourmet blend of German, Irish, Italian and Polish for over a hundred years. In the morning, a Polish lady used to bring in a big steamer full of pierogis . Those things were the lightest and airiest you could ever taste, not fried or anything. Often have wondered how she made them. She always sold out early and then just rolled her big stainless steamer back out of the building until the next day.
 

Catlady

Senior Member
Location
Southern AZ
Original Poster
I hate to sound stupid, but I've heard the word pierogi but never knew what they were or how they were made, now I just want to know how you eat them. Is it for lunch or dinner or breakfast? What to serve with it?
 

Catlady

Senior Member
Location
Southern AZ
Original Poster
Many many years ago, when we lived in Cleveland, Ohio, the West Side Market there is gigantic and has been a gourmet blend of German, Irish, Italian and Polish for over a hundred years. In the morning, a Polish lady used to bring in a big steamer full of pierogis . Those things were the lightest and airiest you could ever taste, not fried or anything. Often have wondered how she made them. She always sold out early and then just rolled her big stainless steamer back out of the building until the next day.
Umm, sounds good, do you know what they were made with? I also like RR's potato and cheese ones, must find a recipe.
 

Catlady

Senior Member
Location
Southern AZ
Original Poster
You can buy the 2019 version at most grocery stores in the freezer section ..

I should probably buy it already made to make sure I like them. But then make my own, I'm trying to get away from commercially made food. Thanks, will look for them next time I grocery shop.
 

Catlady

Senior Member
Location
Southern AZ
Original Poster
Absolutely and without those softened onions they are nothing. It's not worth making them anymore. There are lots of charitable outlets that have them for sale all the time. About $7 a dozen.
With me it's not the money. I just like to make my own, of anything, so that I know how clean the kitchen is or to fix them to my taste.

I used to buy green corn tamales from this lady at work, they were very reasonably priced and tasted great. Then one day she told me how she had made the masa and asked her boyfriend to go buy some ingredient she needed for the filling. He left and hours later he had not come home and she got angry and went to sleep, all the while that masa had been laying there. After that I didn't buy from her anymore and taught myself to make my own.
 

Liberty

Senior Member
Location
Texas
Umm, sounds good, do you know what they were made with? I also like RR's potato and cheese ones, must find a recipe.
I'm thinking she probably made them like they make these "Duck or Pork Buns"...here's a video - they use yeast and some baking powder.
If you've never had Duck Buns, they are really delicious. To me they were light and airy - the only pierogie I ever tasted that was very similar to the old West Side Market steamed pierogies:

 

Linda Doc

New Member
Location
Philadelphia
I'm 100 percent Polish (married an Irishman), and my grandmother used to make all the authentic Polish foods, especially around the holidays. Wish I had asked her to write down the recipes. She used to make borscht, kielbasa in sauerkraut, rolled-up cabbage with ground meat inside (the name escapes me), whole mushrooms in a tomato-based sauce (yum!), blood sausage (that was pronounced kish-ka, my favorite), and on and on.
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
USA
My grandmother, my uncle and my mother made the family kielbasa, no garlic! Just a small amount of onion s & p through the old fashioned meat grinder. Ham and pork shoulder.

It was simmered in coils in a fry pan until the water was gone, then nicely browned.

So good with horseradish and rye bread!
 

Camper6

Well-known Member
I'm 100 percent Polish (married an Irishman), and my grandmother used to make all the authentic Polish foods, especially around the holidays. Wish I had asked her to write down the recipes. She used to make borscht, kielbasa in sauerkraut, rolled-up cabbage with ground meat inside (the name escapes me), whole mushrooms in a tomato-based sauce (yum!), blood sausage (that was pronounced kish-ka, my favorite), and on and on.
Cabbage Rolls. Not sure of the spelling. Hol-op-chi. Holopchi.

I can't make them. I buy them. Very popular around Christmas time. You have to put an order in.
 

Catlady

Senior Member
Location
Southern AZ
Original Poster
I'm thinking she probably made them like they make these "Duck or Pork Buns"...here's a video - they use yeast and some baking powder.
If you've never had Duck Buns, they are really delicious. To me they were light and airy - the only pierogie I ever tasted that was very similar to the old West Side Market steamed pierogies:

Ah, just now watched the video, lots of meat and I'm a vegetarian. But, that's a whole meal for carnivores. Looks good. Maybe some day I can play with the recipe and make a meatless version. Thanks!
 

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