Serial killer documentary.

macgeek

Member
very interesting documentary on serial killers. Just sort of boggles my mind that someone could do this to people. some you may have heard of, some probably not.

you can watch it free online or on your Roku TV.

Most serial killers were white men for the longest time, but that is not true anymore... Even women can be serial killers.

https://tubitv.com/series/1767/americas_serial_killers_portraits_in_evil

https://tubitv.com/series/4180/becoming_evil_serial_killers
 

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PopsnTuff

Well-known Member
Location
Virginia USA
Thanks for this info....I've always been intrigued by their mental state of mind, being convinced they were born this way with brain neurons all mixed up, reason why they do atrocious things to other humans....normally parents don't raise their kids to be serial killers.....
I've watched most of the documentaries in that link but there's probably some I missed.
 

macgeek

Member
Original Poster
I learned a lot by watching these shows. for example: kids who set fires or hurt animals as children often become serial killers when they get older. :oops:
 

Pepper

Senior Member
Location
NYC
You might like "Mindhunters" on Netflix. It's a dramatization of how the FBI learned to get inside the heads of serial killers and formed their real crime unit. The show talks about real life serial killers.
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
Thanks for this info....I've always been intrigued by their mental state of mind, being convinced they were born this way with brain neurons all mixed up, reason why they do atrocious things to other humans....normally parents don't raise their kids to be serial killers.....
I've watched most of the documentaries in that link but there's probably some I missed.
Some parents DO raise their kids to be killers. They just don't realize it.
 

Ceege

Member
Location
Michigan
There was a book written in 1997 called "The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect Us from Violence" by Gavin de Becker.
"The book demonstrates how every individual should learn to trust the inherent "gift" of their gut instinct. By learning to recognize various warning signs and precursors to violence, it becomes possible to avoid potential trauma and harm." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gift_of_Fear

I read it when it first came out and have saved it to give to my granddaughter when she is around 16. When I heard the author speak, I remember him saying that the feeling you get in the back of your neck - that stiff tingling feeling - is an instinct you should trust. It means something. Perhaps someone is watching you. Doubt should put you on the alert. I also remember not to let anyone take you from point A to point B. Better to be wounded, or even killed, at the start (where there might be witnesses) than taken off and being tortured and then killed.

Dreadful things to have to think about, but knowledge is a good weapon, sometimes.
 

911

Senior Member
Location
USA
Listening to psychiatrists talk about what makes a serial killer, the consensus among them is that they are not developed through life experiences, such as being in the military, but more likely are born as such biologically. One thing they all agree on is that all serial killers are psychopaths. I remember my neighbor telling me that he admired BTK. I had to ask him why. His answer was even more disturbing when he asked me, “Can you imagine the amount of courage and power he must have had to kill an entire family?”

The FBI has many, many books, manuals and papers available for reading. Most can be found in your public library. I prefer reading about hitmen, especially those that worked for the Mafia. Contract killers that are freelancers really don’t interest me. They are too predictable and usually are arrested within days or a few weeks after their killing. Mafia contract killers are not so predictable and are more careful about being figured out. They plan each execution and very seldom leave any evidence. Sometimes they don’t use the normal methods, like a gunshot behind the ear. Read about “The Iceman” or Richard Kuklinski sometime. He was ‘special.’
 

macgeek

Member
Original Poster
Interesting. I thought for sure that it had to be life experiences and not biological. Its hard to believe that some people could be born to kill and theirs nothing they can do to change that?


Listening to psychiatrists talk about what makes a serial killer, the consensus among them is that they are not developed through life experiences, such as being in the military, but more likely are born as such biologically.
 
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jerry old

redneck, but brainy
Hannibal Lector's first appearance was in the 1986 in 'Mindhunter,' the agent that
'got' Hannibal is now chasing another serial killer.
The agent is successful because he 'thinks' like a serial killer; he takes the viewer
through the 'how' and 'why' of the slayings. However, it is a Hollywood production
not a clinical study.

"In Cold Blood," nonfiction blood and novel were presented with two psychopaths, not serial killers, that kill a family. The murders were 'event driven,' both of the killers were
'power kegs,' only requiring the right circumstances to vent their fury.

More on next post
 

jerry old

redneck, but brainy
There are thousand, if not tens of thousands, of psychopaths within our society.
The vast majority do not have any impulses to carryout great harm to other people.

(Do you know what the hell your talking about?
I might, I just might.)
Empathy is the key word.
The lack of empathy results in a child that becomes an adult where empathy is absent.
Our orphanages produce conformist psychopaths- bona fied psychopaths
where social norms were taught as absolute, but without empathy.
Young people in jail, where there is no one that cares.
Any group of people that have been ostracized...

It is important to note that neglect, withouthold of emotion, or being raised without
empathy need not be real, rather only perceived as real by the young person.

A complicated topic to discuss on this site, but were all interested-why is that?
What's the attraction?
 

Ceege

Member
Location
Michigan
Don't trust strangers or even acquaintances. Pick your friends wisely. It's a shame we have to be careful about being on our own with anyone, even someone we think of as a friend. We never know what is going on in someone else's mind. Can't assume anything. Sad that it has to be like that.
 

macgeek

Member
Original Poster
growing up in the 60s 70s 80s, we all knew our neighbors. these days it just seems like people keep more to themselves, and we don't know who our neighbors are. its true where I live now in the apartments, I don't trust anyone here. not trying to make friends here. sad it has to be that way.
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
How so Win?
By abusing them. There are countless examples.
One: Jeffrey Dahmer's father was interviewed on "60 Minutes" after his son was beaten to death in prison.
The interviewer asked him if there was anything in his childhood or upbringing that may have contributed to him being what he was.
His ignorant father replied, "Oh, no. Whenever Jeffrey misbehaved, I beat the hell out of him."
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA
Conversely, I read an in depth, recent article which states in part:

"There’s a popular theory that most serial killers were abused as children, which manifests into homicidal tendencies later in life. However, Lionel Dahmer, who authored a book on his killer son titled, A Father’s Story, denied that he and Jeffrey’s mother abused him. Lionel did, however, admit that they didn’t give him enough attention when he was a child. "

https://www.earnthenecklace.com/jeffrey-dahmer-family/

Richard Kuklinski (The Iceman) however, was terribly abused and beaten by alcoholic parents.
In fact, he father beat Richard's oldest brother to death and told the police he'd fallen down the stairs. He was convicted of 6 murders but admits to killing hundreds. Interview in link below. Chilling.


https://allthatsinteresting.com/richard-kuklinski-the-iceman
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
Conversely, I read an in depth, recent article which states in part:

"There’s a popular theory that most serial killers were abused as children, which manifests into homicidal tendencies later in life. However, Lionel Dahmer, who authored a book on his killer son titled, A Father’s Story, denied that he and Jeffrey’s mother abused him. Lionel did, however, admit that they didn’t give him enough attention when he was a child. "

https://www.earnthenecklace.com/jeffrey-dahmer-family/

Richard Kuklinski (The Iceman) however, was terribly abused and beaten by alcoholic parents.
In fact, he father beat Richard's oldest brother to death and told the police he'd fallen down the stairs. He was convicted of 6 murders but admits to killing hundreds. Interview in link below. Chilling.


https://allthatsinteresting.com/richard-kuklinski-the-iceman
Many parents don't consider beating their kids abusive. They often call it "Discipline" to make it seem like a good idea.
And, I'll bet after that "60 Minutes" interview, people probably started criticizing Jeffrey's parents, so they changed their statements.
 

macgeek

Member
Original Poster
BTK had stopped killing for years. he got caught because he missed the publicity he was getting. he started sending letters to the police again, and eventually a computer floppy disc, which was traced to his church where he created it. :ROFLMAO: he had no idea the floppy disc can be traced.
 

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