Tai Chi Exercise

Mike

Senior Member
Location
London
For those of you who are able to move and normally would
go out and about for exercise, but are not getting any now,
have you ever thought of or tried "Tai Chi", it is as the name
suggests Chinese, it was devised by a General, way back in
history, he and his troops were under siege for a long time,
certainly months, if not years and he wanted his men to be
fit for battle.

Anyway I have found a very good gentle version in a YouTube
video, it looks easy, but it really isn't and I ache when I have
tried to follow the examples shown.

Mike.
 

Pecos

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
My wife incorporates one Tai Chi workout into her weekly routine and likes it quite a bit. She finds that it poses challenges that are much different than Yoga. Her weekly workout classes also include Line Dancing, so she works a lot of different movements into her week, ….. and it shows. She gave up weights several years ago because she got bored with that form of exercise, and she never did like running. Still, she is 70 and looking good.

I tried Tai Chi a few years ago, but found it to be rather boring compared to Yoga. In its own way, it is every bit as hard.
 

Pinky

Well-known Member
Location
Toronto
We took Level 1 Tai Chi at the Senior's Centre up the street before my husband's hip operation. It was a good workout that requires a fair bit of control. We may go back again, once things are back to normal and they re-open.
 

Pecos

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
They do not have power transition in their movements.
When you watch the movements, it is easy to conclude that there is not a strength/power element to it, but I found that many of the movements were very hard to hold for any length of time and they are a lot more tiring than I expected. I have heard the same thing said about Yoga, but it can also get pretty strenous.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Location
London
Original Poster
The video that I posted above is number 1 of
at least 5 in the series, plus there are many more
advanced ones too.

Practice this one then move on is the idea.

Mike.
 

Bob1950

New Member
Location
Livingston, TX
A student should move power (energy) from his/her feet to the palms continuously as a wave (without any breaks and delays). The simplest example (model) is a whip that transfers power from the handle (feet) to the tip (palms). The body should have a “rubber-like” structure where “yin“ in “yang” and ”yang” in “yin”.
 
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Pecos

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
Tai Chi looks easy, but one needs a certain amount of balance. I have wonky knees, so, it's a challenge
I asked my wife about how Tai Chi affects the knees and she told me that of the three main exercises she does: Tai Chi, Yoga, and Line Dancing, she thought that Tai Chi was the easiest on the knees and that line dancing was the hardest. She also thinks that the mental (meditative) aspect of Tai Chi was very similar to Yoga and she could get mentally "lost in the moment" doing either one.
On the question of balance, Yoga is the most demanding by far.
 

Pinky

Well-known Member
Location
Toronto
I asked my wife about how Tai Chi affects the knees and she told me that of the three main exercises she does: Tai Chi, Yoga, and Line Dancing, she thought that Tai Chi was the easiest on the knees and that line dancing was the hardest. She also thinks that the mental (meditative) aspect of Tai Chi was very similar to Yoga and she could get mentally "lost in the moment" doing either one.
On the question of balance, Yoga is the most demanding by far.
I took yoga many years ago - even into my 8th month of pregnancy. I no longer have the balance for it :(
 

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