The Younger Generation....

Ruthanne

Well-known member
Location
USA
In my home the younger generation is my little Allison birdie..well she has been in her big food dish so much lately. I've been wondering what's up with her. I finally went over to her to see what's going on. She got out of the dish and I picked up the dish and looked inside and what did I find but an..Egg! She's going to be a mama...maybe..not all eggs are fertil, that's one thing I know.

I posted in the bird group on FB asking what to do. Also if any of you have any suggestions and have had birds lay eggs I'd appreciate any ideas. I don't want to touch the egg. I've heard they will reject an egg that has been touched..not sure if I'm right about that. Woo hoo...what to do...:partytime::wow::cool1::praying::wink1:
 

QuickSilver

New member
Location
Midwest
In my home the younger generation is my little Allison birdie..well she has been in her big food dish so much lately. I've been wondering what's up with her. I finally went over to her to see what's going on. She got out of the dish and I picked up the dish and looked inside and what did I find but an..Egg! She's going to be a mama...maybe..not all eggs are fertil, that's one thing I know.

I posted in the bird group on FB asking what to do. Also if any of you have any suggestions and have had birds lay eggs I'd appreciate any ideas. I don't want to touch the egg. I've heard they will reject an egg that has been touched..not sure if I'm right about that. Woo hoo...what to do...:partytime::wow::cool1::praying::wink1:
I used to breed birds.

1. If Allison has not been with Albert... those eggs are not fertile.

2. it is a myth that an egg OR a baby will be rejected if touched. birds have a terrible sense of smell.. and they have a worse sense of taste.. Their main senses are hearing and especially sight. So you can touch the egg

3. It's best to take the egg away if she had not bred with a male. Birds are opportunistic breeders, and hens will continue lay infertile eggs if they feel comfortable and completely at peace with their surroundings.. This can be very harmful to their health as they will deplete their calcium and other minerals.. weakening their bones and organs.. take the egg and shake her up by moving around her perches and dishes and even moving the cage to a different location. She will stop being so comfortable and will stop laying.. which is best for her.. Don't allow her to sit on that egg as it will stimulate more laying
 

Ruthanne

Well-known member
Location
USA
Original Poster
OOO! Did you call the avian vet yet? I'm very interested in what she says. Do birds like yours hatch chicks in captivity?? Do you have to feed special baby bird food? How long till it hatches??
No, I haven't called them yet. Yes, they hatch babies all the time. This is her first time. I don't know how long.
 

QuickSilver

New member
Location
Midwest
I used to breed birds.

1. If Allison has not been with Albert... those eggs are not fertile.

2. it is a myth that an egg OR a baby will be rejected if touched. birds have a terrible sense of smell.. and they have a worse sense of taste.. Their main senses are hearing and especially sight. So you can touch the egg

3. It's best to take the egg away if she had not bred with a male. Birds are opportunistic breeders, and hens will continue lay infertile eggs if they feel comfortable and completely at peace with their surroundings.. This can be very harmful to their health as they will deplete their calcium and other minerals.. weakening their bones and organs.. take the egg and shake her up by moving around her perches and dishes and even moving the cage to a different location. She will stop being so comfortable and will stop laying.. which is best for her.. Don't allow her to sit on that egg as it will stimulate more laying

OOps... sorry.. did you see her mate? Is there a possibility that she did? If so.. supply her with some nesting material you can get at a pet store.. You may want to get a nest box and put the material in it with the egg. But I would leave her be.. You don't need a vet... Hold the egg up to a bright light in a week and look for red blood vessels in it. If it has those it is fertile.. if not.. it's a dud..

What kind of bird is she? Birds usually have more than one egg in a clutch.
 

Ruthanne

Well-known member
Location
USA
Original Poster
I used to breed birds.

1. If Allison has not been with Albert... those eggs are not fertile.

2. it is a myth that an egg OR a baby will be rejected if touched. birds have a terrible sense of smell.. and they have a worse sense of taste.. Their main senses are hearing and especially sight. So you can touch the egg

3. It's best to take the egg away if she had not bred with a male. Birds are opportunistic breeders, and hens will continue lay infertile eggs if they feel comfortable and completely at peace with their surroundings.. This can be very harmful to their health as they will deplete their calcium and other minerals.. weakening their bones and organs.. take the egg and shake her up by moving around her perches and dishes and even moving the cage to a different location. She will stop being so comfortable and will stop laying.. which is best for her.. Don't allow her to sit on that egg as it will stimulate more laying
Danny and her have visited and I wouldn't doubted if they have mated. I called the Avian Vet and they told me to take the egg out of the food dish and put it on the bottom of the cage and she will forget about it. So I put it on the bottom of the cage and she hasn't sat on it any more. I think she's mad at me though.
 

QuickSilver

New member
Location
Midwest
Danny and her have visited and I wouldn't doubted if they have mated. I called the Avian Vet and they told me to take the egg out of the food dish and put it on the bottom of the cage and she will forget about it. So I put it on the bottom of the cage and she hasn't sat on it any more. I think she's mad at me though.
It's very labor intensive to handle a clutch of babies. I would "pull" the babies away from the parents at 2 weeks old and put them in an incubator and begin hand feeding them with a syringe first every 3 hours.. and then several times a day until I was able to wean them and get them eating on their own. This raises very tame and trained birds that are very easy to sell.. BUT it's a lot of work.

Just move her cage around and change her perches and toys so she will stop laying.
 

Ruthanne

Well-known member
Location
USA
Original Poster
It's very labor intensive to handle a clutch of babies. I would "pull" the babies away from the parents at 2 weeks old and put them in an incubator and begin hand feeding them with a syringe first every 3 hours.. and then several times a day until I was able to wean them and get them eating on their own. This raises very tame and trained birds that are very easy to sell.. BUT it's a lot of work.

Just move her cage around and change her perches and toys so she will stop laying.
I will change her toys, there is nowhere else to put her cage.
 

Debby

New member
My daughter had a pair of lovebirds that mated all the time and the female laid eggs continually despite changing things around and cooling the room they spent the most time in and all the other stuff that they say to do. She also had a complete personality change that didn't improve as the months went by. 1000 lbs of ferocity in a few grams of feathers! So if your little Allison is more cranky then she used to be, maybe she's just made the hormonal shift. I think there's a reason why most people want male birds instead of the females. We had a pair of budgies years ago and the female was a misery always.
 
My sister used to breed her birds and hand-raise some of the babies (you get a lot more money for hand-raised babies). Yes, it's intensive work. Once, I had to take over as substitute mama for a couple of days. As I was going to be away from the house for several hours, I had to pack up just like taking a human baby somewhere. Baby-bird mush to be mixed with water and put into a syringe to be squirted into its crop. I wrapped the baby in toilet paper and stuck it down into my cleavage to keep it warm.

I got a lot of funny looks because of the peeps and squawks emitting from my t-shirt.
 

Ruthanne

Well-known member
Location
USA
Original Poster
Thanks for the replies. Allison has laid 3 eggs so far. She lays them on the bottom of the cage and ignores them. It's for the best. Danny is most likely sterile at 7 years old I am told. A lady in the FB bird group told me they get sterile at age 5. I don't want to be a breeder. I am not equipped for it. I guess I should have gotten a male bird but Allison is such a joy; a real nice birdie!
 


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