Uncle Bill Shakespeare...Alive and Well!

Meanderer

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PA, USA
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
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PA, USA
American journalist Paula Zahn interviews Sir Patrick Stewart on his role in GREAT PERFORMANCES' Macbeth.
 

Meanderer

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Location
PA, USA
Hamlet... comic version of Shakespeare's play (Lawrence Morritt)

Oor Hamlet (aka The Three-Minute Hamlet) was written by Adam McNaughton of Glasgow, Scotland. It was recorded on McNaughton's album Words, Words, Words which is apparently long out of print. Here's what McNaughton has to say about the song (taken from the liner notes of that album):

"The first 'act' of Oor Hamlet was written when I was reading the play with a fifth-year class at Cathakin High School. It then lay untouched for a year, until I saw a letter in 'Sandy Bell's Broadsheet' which I felt overstated the case for singing more ballads in folk clubs. The writer, Sheila Douglas, had made a comparison between the plots of the ballads and the plot of Hamlet. This proved to be the stimulus I needed and I finished off the 'poem' very quickly. Even before I sent it off, however, I realized with slight amendments and additions it could be sung to the tune of The Mason's Apron." (Read Lyrics)
 
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Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA, USA
William Shakespeare's Get Thee Back To The Future!


"In the iconic film by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale, teenaged Marty McFly travels back in time from the 1980s to the 1950s, changing the path of his parents' destiny . . . as well as his own. Now fans of the movie can journey back even further-to the 16th century, when the Bard of Avon unveils his latest masterpiece: William Shakespeare's Get Thee Back to the Future! Every scene and line of dialogue from the hit movie is re-created with authentic Shakespearean rhyme, meter, and stage directions. This reimagining also includes jokes and Easter eggs for movie fans, from Huey Lewis call-outs to the inner thoughts of Einstein (the dog). By the time you've finished reading, you'll be convinced that Shakespeare had a time-traveling DeLorean of his own, speeding to our era so he could pen this time-tossed tale".
 

Meanderer

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Location
PA, USA
Christopher Lloyd as King Lear
King Lear featuring Christopher Lloyd


"The 2021 Shakespeare & Company theater season gets off to a roaring start with Christopher Lloyd as King Lear".

"Christopher Lloyd got his start as an apprentice in summer stock at age 14 and now has a career spanning nearly five decades. Most recognize him for his roles as Reverend Jim Ignatowski on television’s “Taxi” or Dr. Emmett Brown from the “Back to the Future” movies. Though better known for his roles on the big and small screen, the actor has also appeared in over two hundred plays".

"King Lear, widely regarded as one of Shakespeare’s most moving tragedies, tells the tale of the once-powerful king dividing his kingdom between his three daughters. The production, originally scheduled for the summer of 2020, will be performed outdoors at the New Spruce Theater in Lenox, MA".

Mixed Reviews:
https://stagebuddy.com/theater/theater-review/king-lear
https://www.timesunion.com/theater/...loyd-as-King-Lear-was-a-bad-idea-16305990.php
 
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Meanderer

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Location
PA, USA
The Shakespeare Diet

"So if we can't go for a 10,000-year-old diet, would something more in the 500-year range be possible? Or at all beneficial? Well, it turns out life expectancy in the Tudor era (say 1485-1603 A.D.) wasn't any great shakes. On average, you were looking at your mid-30s, a little less if you were a woman, since childbirth was so perilous, but really if you made it through childhood you had a good chance of living longer. It was the high infant mortality that dragged overall life expectancy way down. In any case, though, few made it to old age. Accidents or disease dragged them off, since once you were sick you were basically a goner, however many times the local doctor might "bleed" you to be helpful".

"On the plus side, food was local and unprocessed and low in sugar, so, even if you had a long enough life to develop metabolic syndrome, you usually didn't. Only the very rich, with access to lots of sugar and delicacies, suffered from gout or even tooth decay. (Henry VIII became famously enormous and unhealthy, and even Elizabeth I was reported to have blackened, rotting teeth.) So what did Shakespearean-era people eat? According to How to Be a Tudor by Ruth Goodman, the common folk ate a lot of bread. But not bread like we know it". (READ MORE)


"Maybe any historical diet takes a misleading view of history. After all, no one pictures themselves as the penniless beggars in period dramas, only as the well-to-do in their lovely outfits. So if I were to write a Shakespeare Diet book, I'd focus on the local, fresh, seasonal, genetically-varied food, with limited sugar and processing and--oh, wait--that diet book's been written a hundred times already".
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA, USA
Shakespeare company happily moves to The Gladstone theatre (Link)


Vexed and thwarted by city bylaw officials in Old Ottawa South, a student Shakespeare company will instead take to the stage of The Gladstone theatre. Photo by Jean Levac /Postmedia News


The Company of Adventurers has moved its student production of William Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors from a Glen Avenue backyard to The Gladstone Theatre, which offered its facilities for free. jpg
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA, USA
Classmates of the late John F. Kennedy Jr., pictured at right, say he was committed to seeking truth and social progress through journalism and art. While at Brown, Kennedy appeared in several theater productions, including "The Tempest" with fellow Class of 1983 graduate Andrew Weems. Photo: John Hay Library/Brown University
 

Meanderer

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Location
PA, USA
Act 2 Scene 3 | Much Ado about Nothing | 2014 | Royal Shakespeare Company
"The company of Love's Labour's Won (Much Ado about Nothing) perform Act 2 Scene 3 with John Hodgkinson as Don Pedro, Tunji Kasim as Claudio, David Horovitch as Leonato and Edward Bennett as Benedick in Christopher Luscombe's 2014 production of Love's Labour's Won with the Royal Shakespeare Company".
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA, USA
"It’s a little known fact that Shakespeare indirectly inspired Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. Maybe, the creator for Montgomery Ward, was a Shakespeare and a Verdi fan".

"Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer is based on Bardolph the red nosed knave. Rudolph=Bardolph. Both have red noses. Bardolph is the primary antlered deer at the end of Falstaff. Falstaff (in Verdi’s version) has the line “So che se andiam, la notte, di taverna in taverna, Quel tuo naso ardentissimo mi serve da lanterna! Ma quel risparmio d’olio tu lo consumi in vino” which roughly translates “Bardolph with your nose so bright, you’ll guide me to the tavern tonight. But you’ll cost me more in wine than you’ll save in oil.”
 
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Meanderer

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Location
PA, USA
This Amazing Bench In The Library Of Alexandria Is Inscribed With Shakespeare’s Sonnets

There’s a unique bench located in the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Egypt​



It is shaped like an open book and it’s every book lover’s dream​

 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA, USA

SONNET 57

Being your slave, what should I do but tend
Upon the hours and times of your desire?
I have no precious time at all to spend,
Nor services to do, till you require.
Nor dare I chide the world-without-end hour
Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you,
Nor think the bitterness of absence sour
When you have bid your servant once adieu;
Nor dare I question with my jealous thought
Where you may be, or your affairs suppose,
But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought
Save, where you are how happy you make those.
So true a fool is love that in your will,
Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill.
 

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