Which bread do you buy?

Della

Member
I'm having trouble finding a regular bread we all like? I get home with dry tasting whole wheat or white that gets gooey. I don't want too much sugar but 2 to 4 grams is okay. For a while we were eating Kroger Private Selection Sugarfree Whole wheat and then I noticed it contained "sucralose." I felt kind of lied to.
 

SeaBreeze

Endlessly Groovin'
Location
USA
We buy Orowheat Oatnut bread, or Dave's GoodSeed bread. We also buy small frozen French bread loaves from Costco that you make in the oven, just had some for supper with shrimp salad for a sandwich.
 

Gaer

unrepentant sinner
We have a Zojirushi bread machine. Makes fantastic bread!

Sadly for me, bread and butter are not diet food.

But still ...
Devi, I've never used a bread machine. Can you tell me what they do exactly? Do they mix it, knead it? Does it rise in the machine or only bake it, (which can be done in an oven). Could this be used for sourdough? Do you bake with or without pans?
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA
Different kinds. Usually whole wheat, but I also pick up Italian, white and rye. The sourdough in the supermarkets here have devolved into no taste at all except vinegar. I'd have to go to a real bakery or fly to San Francisco for the real thing.
 

Lizzie00

šŸ˜Ž
Location
Down South
Granted NOTHING is as good as fresh baked bread, but IMHO Sarah Lee Delightful is seriously good & definitely not dry/stale when opened....aaaand, itā€™s only 45 calories per slicešŸ‘
 

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Yeah... I usually make my bread. But, first of all, I just don't eat much bread. When I do... it is home made yeast rise.... or in my machine, I like hone nut with a tablespoon of flax.... tomorrow, I am making a loaf of bread, company coming. Whoever asked about using the machines.... they mix, knead, and bake all in one container. Takes about 3.5 hours.
 

Devi

Member
Location
WA USA
Devi, I've never used a bread machine. Can you tell me what they do exactly? Do they mix it, knead it? Does it rise in the machine or only bake it, (which can be done in an oven). Could this be used for sourdough? Do you bake with or without pans?

Ah. This is pretty much what we have (but it makes taller two-pound loaves, while ours makes one-pound loaves). And ours is cream-colored on the top rather than black.
https://www.amazon.com/Zojirushi-BB...maker-Stainless/dp/B07BQ28TQ6?ref_=ast_sto_dp

It has a bread pan inside, where you put the ingredients (I believe all dry), close it up and turn it on. It mixes, kneads, lets it rise, and then bakes it. There's a stopping point where you can add ingredients (nuts? raisins?). It also has delayed settings, so you can program it to start in the middle of the night for a freshly-baked loaf in the morning.

My husband says it will make sourdough. To be honest, once I bought it and showed it to my husband, he took over all bread-making duties. :cool:
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
We love Country Harvest 14 Grain.

Meaty (if I can use that term), nutty, moist, and very tasty.

Sugars - 2g

No high-fructose corn syrup... no artificial sweeteners.
Manufacturers are permitted to deceive us on their food labeling. Unless a consumer is diabetic or researches it in detail, it may not be as important, but if someone is trying to lose weight, it is a big factor. Example:
"Country Harvest" bread does have only 2 gms sugar. But what they're not required to tell you is that they are only referring to added sugar, actual table sugar - not the total sugar which is included in the carbohydrates. On that bread, each slice actually has 18 gms sugar, not 2 gms. They are required to list that on the "Carbohydrate" part of the label & they hope you don't know that the carbohydrates are part of the sugar, since both carbs and actual sugar are quickly converted to glucose as soon as you eat it.
If someone is trying to lose weight, thinking they're only getting 2 gms sugar per slice of that bread, they will be frustrated because a typical sandwich with that bread will have 36 gms of sugar before anything is put in the sandwich. Compare it to a can of soft drink which has 40 gms.
Add up that sandwich & a drink & you have 76 gms sugar - just the bread & the drink.

Why is that important? It's the excess sugar that causes weight gain & prevents weight loss. The more sugar we eat, the more insulin is produced to push the sugar into muscle cells for energy. Insulin is a fat-storage hormone, so the more we require, the more fat we store.
And, there is only so much exercise & activity we can do when we're older, so if we eat that way, we end up with a lot of excess sugar we won't use. It is then converted to fat for storage when muscle cells are filled to capacity.

Since I love bread, one of the most depressing things I had to learn was that bread is a highly-processed food that will quickly spike blood sugar, which also means a spike in insulin production which means a spike in fat storage. For years, I couldn't lose weight because I didn't have that information; I just focused on fat & calories.
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
Manufacturers are permitted to deceive us on their food labeling. Unless a consumer is diabetic or researches it in detail, it may not be as important, but if someone is trying to lose weight, it is a big factor. Example:
"Country Harvest" bread does have only 2 gms sugar. But what they're not required to tell you is that they are only referring to added sugar, actual table sugar - not the total sugar which is included in the carbohydrates. On that bread, each slice actually has 18 gms sugar, not 2 gms. They are required to list that on the "Carbohydrate" part of the label & they hope you don't know that the carbohydrates are part of the sugar, since both carbs and actual sugar are quickly converted to glucose as soon as you eat it.
If someone is trying to lose weight, thinking they're only getting 2 gms sugar per slice of that bread, they will be frustrated because a typical sandwich with that bread will have 36 gms of sugar before anything is put in the sandwich. Compare it to a can of soft drink which has 40 gms.
Add up that sandwich & a drink & you have 76 gms sugar - just the bread & the drink.

Why is that important? It's the excess sugar that causes weight gain & prevents weight loss. The more sugar we eat, the more insulin is produced to push the sugar into muscle cells for energy. Insulin is a fat-storage hormone, so the more we require, the more fat we store.
And, there is only so much exercise & activity we can do when we're older, so if we eat that way, we end up with a lot of excess sugar we won't use. It is then converted to fat for storage when muscle cells are filled to capacity.

Since I love bread, one of the most depressing things I had to learn was that bread is a highly-processed food that will quickly spike blood sugar, which also means a spike in insulin production which means a spike in fat storage. For years, I couldn't lose weight because I didn't have that information; I just focused on fat & calories.
Wow!

Thank you for the well put together post, Win.

Chaps my bottom something awful as to how deceiving the food industry and labeling is. I knew sugar awaited us at every turn, but this is downright infuriating.
 

Gaer

unrepentant sinner
Ah. This is pretty much what we have (but it makes taller two-pound loaves, while ours makes one-pound loaves). And ours is cream-colored on the top rather than black.
https://www.amazon.com/Zojirushi-BB...maker-Stainless/dp/B07BQ28TQ6?ref_=ast_sto_dp

It has a bread pan inside, where you put the ingredients (I believe all dry), close it up and turn it on. It mixes, kneads, lets it rise, and then bakes it. There's a stopping point where you can add ingredients (nuts? raisins?). It also has delayed settings, so you can program it to start in the middle of the night for a freshly-baked loaf in the morning.

My husband says it will make sourdough. To be honest, once I bought it and showed it to my husband, he took over all bread-making duties. :cool:
WOW! THANK YOU!!!!! wow!!!
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
Wow!

Thank you for the well put together post, Win.

Chaps my bottom something awful as to how deceiving the food industry and labeling is. I knew sugar awaited us at every turn, but this is downright infuriating.
When food labels became required, it stands to reason that there would be compromises. Food manufacturers (of course) didn't want any obstacles to profit, so they bargained with the FDA & were allowed a certain amount of deception - likely including payola & other perks to the FDA. Telling the complete truth on those labels would result in a big reduction in sales; health-conscious people would buy less & less of the product.
That's also behind the claims on some processed food packaging to make consumers think it's a "Health Food."
"Cheerios prevents heart disease & reduces cholesterol." (It says so on the box). LOL - that TV ad that shows a father on a treadmill, while talking to his infant daughter about how Cheerios is protecting his heart.
 

Jules

Senior Member
Location
N of 49
A couple of small grocery stores bake their own, though I suspect that they are pre-made loaves. There are no preservatives. I freeze the loaf and just take out what I figure Iā€™ll need for the day.
 
Della,

What kind of bread are you looking for? Sandwich loaf, something like that with more texture, flavor? A sturdier crust with a more open crumb? Bagel? Pita? Variety grains?, etc. If you can give some specifics folks can give better recommendations.

We haven't bought bread in 10 years, and it would be longer about 14 years, but 10 years ago our living situation was such, there was no stove available for several months.

Never have used a bread machine, or even a mixer for that matter. It's not really that hard to make bread oneself, but can be more time consuming...or not.

A no knead loaf is made with 4 ingredients, no added sugar, and can be made in a loaf pan. Working time, 5 minutes the first day, 10 minutes the next. I realize not everyone wants to do this, but still it's an option.
 

Della

Member
Della,

What kind of bread are you looking for? Sandwich loaf, something like that with more texture, flavor? A sturdier crust with a more open crumb? Bagel? Pita? Variety grains?, etc. If you can give some specifics folks can give better recommendations.
I'm mainly looking for a brand I can buy at the store to use for sandwiches, (but not the thin "sandwich" bread.)

As Gaer pointed out it seems we're getting a lot of old bread from the stores because I get home with some very stale tasting bread even though I check the dates. My son takes two sandwiches to work each day so we use quite a bit. We like all types depending on what we're making, rye for ham sandwiches, whole wheat for most others.

My mother taught me how to make bread from scratch when I was a teenager and I've done that a lot over the years, usually for special occasions. Now arthritis has made my hands too weak to knead well. My brother tried to give me a bread maker, but I refused because, as Win pointed out, bread is mainly all carbs so I don't want it to be the center of our diet, all three of us would eat too much of it if it was fresh from the bread maker every day. We just want just a good sandwich for lunch now and then, we never eat it for dinner.

Thanks all for the good suggestions I'm writing down all the brand names suggested and going to give them a try.
 

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