Windows are still dusty even after washing

Earlier this week, my chore was to wash windows. I have old-fashioned double-hung with weights that clunk in the walls when opening or closing the windows. They still look dirty and it's probably because they are dirty between the two windows. I don't know how to get in between them.
 

Don M.

Well-known Member
Location
central Missouri
Are you asking about "Double Pane" windows....those with 2 planes of glass in each window separated by a small gap of air?? They can also be "double hung". If you have the double pane types, and the inner surfaces of the glass have become fogged or dirty.....usually caused by failing and leaking seals, there is little you can do other than having them replaced. There are ways to reduce the "fogging" by drilling a couple of small holes in the frame, to allow the moisture to escape...but this is tricky, and can only be effective if done when there is a period of warm dry weather.

If the inner glass has become "dirty", that is a sure sign that the frames have become deteriorated, and this can only be resolved by replacing the entire window And frame...could be expensive.
 
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Ruth n Jersey

Well-known Member
I agree with Don M. if the widows are double and sealed there is little you can do. I had that happen and replaced 2 of them because they are so unsightly.
It you just can't reach the entire window because of the other window, I found that a pair of kitchen tongs with a rag works well. It takes lot of "ups and downs" to reach it all and time consuming but it can be done. A little step stool helps also.
Recently I also found out that Mr. Clean works better than glass cleaner.
 

Original Poster
If the inner glass has become "dirty", that is a sure sign that the frames have become deteriorated, and this can only be resolved by replacing the entire window And frame...could be expensive.
No doubt about deterioration. Frequent condensation between the panes, which turn into frost ferns in winter. Failing putty, glass is cracked in the corners of many of the windows, both the inner and outer panes. The glass is OLD - there are air bubbles in some of the panes and the glass is wavy.

window cond.jpgwindow frost.jpgwindow sash.jpg
 

Kaila

Well-known Member
I can't imagine the expense of replacing so many of those, yikes.... @debodun :oops:

Perhaps, just start with one or two, in the spots you would most enjoy them, and benefit most from, with both the improved visual, when you are looking out, and also , newer ones would be better insulated, to help keep a room warmer in winter, maybe.....
 
Until I moved into this place 10 years ago, the house I lived in (and the ones I grew up in) had those windows. I've pulled them apart more than once due to a broken sash weight rope...like big damned cuckoo clock weight. And the one house built in the 1800s had very old glass...it was wavy to look through.

I don't think those are double pane windows, they are single pane (# of panes of glass in each frame.) Here's the diff:



You're having issue with the dirt where the top & bottom frames overlap, not on the actual glass, right?

You might be more comfortable (especially in the winter) and save heating costs if you had them replaced,if you can afford it. They'll put you on a payment plan. At least consider having the ones on the northeast-facing side of the house done to keep the winter wind out (ask the local experts on that.)

I hated messing with my old storm windows and would put up the heat-shrink plastic on the inside in the winter. When the wind would blow, the plastic filled up like a sail!
 
There are 26 windows in my house (not counting doors, attic and cellar).
That's kind of a lot. My home is 1,300 ft² or so, and I've got about half that many.

I worked with a non-profit that did home repairs for low-income folks. I was a field hand as well as treasurer and general business guy. I also wrote grant proposals. The corporations that support the community have different missions and areas of focus. Some specialize in helping with energy efficiency.

You could check with the non-profits in your area to see what assistance might be available.
 
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You count them. I lose track after about 12. There are 8 in first photo on the right side that aren't visible.

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Sorry. I wasn't implying you miscounted the number, although I can see how it reads that way.

I was saying that that's certainly a lot of windows to consider replacing. If my reference point 1,300 ft² home has 12, then a house that's 2,000 ft² or more would certainly have double that...or more.
 

Aunt Bea

SF VIP
Location
Near Mount Pilot
Sorry. I wasn't implying you miscounted the number, although I can see how it reads that way.

I was saying that that's certainly a lot of windows to consider replacing. If my reference point 1,300 ft² home has 12, then a house that's 2,000 ft² or more would certainly have double that...or more.
I think a large number of smaller windows were more common in the days before the regular use of electric light, air conditioning, etc...
 

Em in Ohio

Senior Member
Location
OH HI OH
You count them. I lose track after about 12. There are 8 in first photo on the right side that aren't visible.

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Love the house but fear that many of your windows would have to be custom ordered as they don't appear to be standard size. I agree with the idea of just replacing the ones with a view that you value or perhaps those most visible from the street. If they are truly double pane, not just double-hung single pane, there really isn't a good alternative. I have seen ads that say they can clean between panes of glass, but the reviews were bad. (I replaced the back sliders and wide side panels on this house because of fogging, sweating, frosting, and rainbow effects between the panes - best investment I ever made, since my backyard is my haven and I wanted to see it!)
 

Em in Ohio

Senior Member
Location
OH HI OH
Now that I've read up on windows - they are single pane, double hung.
That's good news! Now, given the height of the windows (distance from ground) and your possible age (on a senior site), I think you might want to hire a one-time cleaning company to give you a fresh start, as long as they are willing to clean the tracks as well. Or, as suggested above, try to find a 'tool' that will reach that awkward area. I used to use something called 'Formula 409' - no doubt probably toxic, but it could be sprayed in and the crud would just flood down to where it was reachable. Also, I'd use shop rags, not paper towels that tend to add dust particles to glass. Just some ideas... let us know if you get them clean!
 

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