Words and their pronunciation

GeorgiaXplant

Well-known Member
Location
Georgia
I posted this on the "Holidays" thread and am posting it here, too:

Am I the only one left in the world who's annoyed that Hallowe'en (as in All Hallows Eve, now known as All Saints Day) is now pronounced Holloween? I realize that language changes and words morph into something else, but Holloween? Really?

Another one is applicable. It's APP-licable and has become a-PLICK-able.

Picky, maybe, but it drives me right around the bend.
 

officerripley

Senior Member
Location
Porlock, Calif
I hadn't noticed about "a-PLICK-able", but I've noticed "HOLLOWeen" too & it bugs me too, sigh. And what else does: people will talk about "Halloween NIGHT." Um, the word Halloween means "All Hallows EVE (or evening or night)", people, so you don't need to talk about Halloween NIGHT, just say "...at 8:00 p.m. [or whatever time] on Halloween"; you don't need to add that extra "night."
 

horseless carriage

Senior Member
I posted this on the "Holidays" thread and am posting it here, too:

Am I the only one left in the world who's annoyed that Hallowe'en (as in All Hallows Eve, now known as All Saints Day) is now pronounced Holloween? I realize that language changes and words morph into something else, but Holloween? Really?

Another one is applicable. It's APP-licable and has become a-PLICK-able.

Picky, maybe, but it drives me right around the bend.
The All Saints' Day celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas, from Middle English Alholowmesse, meaning All Saints' Day. The night before it, the traditional night of Samhain, in the Celtic religion, began to be called All-Hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween.
As for Holloween,sounds more like a case of Mrs Malaprop.

The character Mrs. Malaprop is a humorous aunt who gets mixed up in the schemes and dreams of young lovers in Richard Brinsley Sheridan's, 1775 comedy-of-manners, The Rivals.
 


Top