Words in English in dialects/language that have the same meaning

Treacle

Member
Not sure I've made the right heading but here goes. Reading some of the posts I notice the use of English words that are the same object/thing etc etc but the words differ
So I just saw :

Rebounder = Trampoline
Old cheese = mature cheddar Sorry Pinky I let myself down on that one it was obvious:rolleyes:
Tatties =potatoes

This could be a real learning experience.........................ok for me 🤓

So any words you want to post.
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA
Washing up = Washing (or doing) the dishes.
Jumper = Sweater
Neeps = Turnip
Aubergine (French) = Eggplant
Courgette (French) = Zucchini squash
Pudding = Cake or a cake-like thing
Custard = Pudding
Knock up = Get pregnant
Petrol = Gasoline or gas
Fizzy drink + Soda or pop or sodapop

I've learned many British phrases just from this forum.

(you say tom-AH-to, we say tom-AY- to)
 

Warrigal

SF VIP
Not sure I've made the right heading but here goes. Reading some of the posts I notice the use of English words that are the same object/thing etc etc but the words differ
So I just saw :

Rebounder = Trampoline
Old cheese = mature cheddar Sorry Pinky I let myself down on that one it was obvious:rolleyes:
Tatties =potatoes

This could be a real learning experience.........................ok for me 🤓

So any words you want to post.
In Australia potatoes are often called spuds. One of our senior federal politicians has the nickname Spud because of a resemblance to Mr Potato Head.
 

Treacle

Member
Original Poster
I remember speaking with a woman from the UK, and she referred to money as "dosh".
Dosh is the British slang word for money☺
In Australia potatoes are often called spuds. One of our senior federal politicians has the nickname Spud because of a resemblance to Mr Potato Head.
We also use the word Spud, Warrigal for potatoes. It's an informal word which you wouldn't find on a menu (not to my knowledge ) so you wouldn't say roast pork with spuds, it would be potatoes but although not written it is probably used verbally. I named my first cat Spud because as a kitten she liked to eat the cooked skin of potato. Just caught her once up on the table and that was it. But she wasn't given spuds for her food - it was a one off but weird.:rolleyes:
 

Capt Lightning

Senior Member
Referring back to reply #2, the term 'knock up' can refer to an exchange of practice shots before a tennis match.
Historically, before many working people had alarm clocks, a man called the "knocker upper" would go round knocking on doors or windows to wake (knock up) people in time to get to the factories.
Knock up also refers to make something quickly / simply eg. knock up a quick meal for supper.
It is not often used in a sexual context although a brothel is sometimes referred to as a 'knocking shop' .
 

Tommy

Member
Location
New Hampshire
When we moved to Maine years ago we discovered that what most the US calls:
a rubber band = an elastic
a grocery cart = a carriage
a baby pacifier = a binky
an medical examination gown = a johnny
sprinkles (as on a cupcake) = jimmies
a traffic circle = a rotary
a cottage = a camp
a milkshake = a frappe
front porch = stoop
and quite a few more that don't come to mind a the moment.
 
When we moved to Maine years ago we discovered that what most the US calls:
a rubber band = an elastic
a grocery cart = a carriage
a baby pacifier = a binky
an medical examination gown = a johnny
sprinkles (as on a cupcake) = jimmies
a traffic circle = a rotary
a cottage = a camp
a milkshake = a frappe
front porch = stoop
and quite a few more that don't come to mind a the moment.
Ah, Maine! Home of the best seafood and Anadama Bread! I loved Maine
 

Capt Lightning

Senior Member
Tommy, I've amended this to add some UK equivalents

When we moved to Maine years ago we discovered that what most the US calls:

a grocery cart = a carriage = a shopping trolley
a baby pacifier = a binky = a dummy

sprinkles (as on a cupcake) = jimmies = hundreds & thousands
a traffic circle = a rotary = a roundabout
a cottage = a camp = a cottage, but in Scotland a small cottage is often called a "Butt and Ben".

and quite a few more that don't come to mind a the moment.
 

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