Years ago SSD was difficult to qualify for

debodun

Well-known member
I don't know if the system has changed in the last 30 years. One time my mom, who had cardiovascular problems, applied for disability. Of course, she had to get an exam from their physician. Naturally, if you didn't show up for the exam, you couldn't get disability. If you managed to make it to the doctor, you demonstrated that you weren't disabled. What a Catch-22!
 

win231

Well-known member
Location
CA
Reminded me of a "Court TV" episode - a woman had several health issues & she was on disability. The judge tried to make her look like she was on disability because she just didn't want to work, so she asked the woman if she had a live-in boyfriend or a husband. When the woman said she did have a boyfriend, the judge said, "If you can have a good time with your boyfriend, you can work."
The woman was a bit more intelligent than the judge & she replied, "Sex doesn't last 8 hours."
 

Aunt Bea

Well-known member
Location
Near Mount Pilot
My father had a stroke and applied for SSD in the late 60s. The process took over six months before he was approved but it was not difficult just time-consuming and frustrating in the days before everyone had easy access to copiers, fax machines, etc...
 

Pepper

Well-known member
The backup in receiving SSD is based on the premise one might give up the process or die before any benefits can be paid out. It's built into the system.
 

mathjak107

Well-known member
not according to what is being paid out . payments over the years have sky rocketed as ssdi has become the new unemployment insurance ... one man alone eric conn slipped through 1/2 billion in fraudulent claims in conjunction with a crooked doctor and judge .

billions had to be taken out of social security retirement and diverted to ssdi when ssdi went broke from all the claims.

over 100 were arrested here in ny in conjunction with pushing through fraudulent claims . so fraud is a big issue and remember , they only know about the tip of the iceberg that they catch or investigate .

All of the disabled are classified into three categories: Improvement Expected, Improvement Possible and Improvement Not Expected.

Someone with a spinal chord injury is classified as Improvement Not Expected, but even so, their case is automatically reviewed every 5 to 7 years to determine if they should continue receiving benefits.

Where you have Improvement Expected, their case is reviewed every 6 to 18 months. It's 3 years for all others.

About 3.5 Million of the 10.1 Million on Disability have mental disorders. Of those, 1.5 Million have "Mood Disorders" and the rest are autistic, mentally disabled, have congenital brain defects, head injuries, or are schizophrenic.

Social Security doesn't require the 1.5 Million with "Mood Disorders" to be involved in any treatment program, but they should. They should be required to attend weekly treatment sessions, and if they fail to do so, they need to be terminated.
 
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StarSong

Well-known member
not according to what is being paid out . payments over the years have sky rocketed as ssdi has become the new unemployment insurance ... one man alone eric conn slipped through 1/2 billion in fraudulent claims in conjunction with a crooked doctor and judge .


I completely agree, Mathjak. Daytime TV and billboards feature a parade of lawyers promising to get people SSDI benefits even if they've already been turned down.
 

MeAgain

Active member
not according to what is being paid out . payments over the years have sky rocketed as ssdi has become the new unemployment insurance ... one man alone eric conn slipped through 1/2 billion in fraudulent claims in conjunction with a crooked doctor and judge .

billions had to be taken out of social security retirement and diverted to ssdi when ssdi went broke from all the claims.

over 100 were arrested here in ny in conjunction with pushing through fraudulent claims . so fraud is a big issue and remember , they only know about the tip of the iceberg that they catch or investigate .

All of the disabled are classified into three categories: Improvement Expected, Improvement Possible and Improvement Not Expected.

Someone with a spinal chord injury is classified as Improvement Not Expected, but even so, their case is automatically reviewed every 5 to 7 years to determine if they should continue receiving benefits.

Where you have Improvement Expected, their case is reviewed every 6 to 18 months. It's 3 years for all others.

About 3.5 Million of the 10.1 Million on Disability have mental disorders. Of those, 1.5 Million have "Mood Disorders" and the rest are autistic, mentally disabled, have congenital brain defects, head injuries, or are schizophrenic.

Social Security doesn't require the 1.5 Million with "Mood Disorders" to be involved in any treatment program, but they should. They should be required to attend weekly treatment sessions, and if they fail to do so, they need to be terminated.
Many of these are kids on SSD with HDAD,etc. Of course it can't be proven and no followup required.
I had a slow person in my family but he didn't ask for SSD. Its a scam used to take money form legitimate disabled programs.
I knew a woman who told her two sons not to learn to read so she could keep collecting on their mental retardation claims.
 

AnnieA

Well-known member
It was much easier to get in my area years ago. Had a local doctor and lawyer who teamed to scam the system. Going by the doctor's number of patients on SSI or SSDI, I'm guessing they were paying off a judge as well.
 
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Ruthanne

Well-known member
Location
Ohio, USA
I don't know if the system has changed in the last 30 years. One time my mom, who had cardiovascular problems, applied for disability. Of course, she had to get an exam from their physician. Naturally, if you didn't show up for the exam, you couldn't get disability. If you managed to make it to the doctor, you demonstrated that you weren't disabled. What a Catch-22!
If you already had a doctor (s) who could verify your condition (s) it was not impossible to get SSI or SSDI. So, in other words if you had plenty of documentation or enough of it you could get it.
 


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