mispronunciations

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
I'm from Massachusetts. I never thought Pres. Kennedy had an accent. So, when those foreigners from far off lands, like New Jersey, got lost, they were looking for Worcester, Mass. And did they butcher that name. Locals pronounce it "Wist-ah", Mass". The one town visitors just gave up even trying to pronounce was Leicester, Mass. "Lest-ah, Mass."
BTW, I have no idea why Massachusetts people do this, but you have to add, "Mass." to a city. It's not Boston, it's "Boston, Mass". Oxford, Mass. Springfield, Mass. etc
we have a Worcester here.. and of course we manufacture the world famous Worcester sauce... and people almost universally call it War..sester.. we also have Leicester here in the uk too.. funnily enough no-one finds it difficult to pronounce Leicester.. which here is pronounced Lester.. but Worcester is pronounced Wooster.. and people find that difficult to pronounce for some reason..
 
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Remy

Well-known Member
Location
California, USA
I was watching a video from Australia on YouTube for a hair salon. It had some ASMR qualities which is why I watched it. When the nice lady was explaining how to put on the coloring or conditioner, she said to do it in a certain pattern. But when she said "pattern" it sounded like "pa-on".

Also I swear some young people wound like they are talking in all vowels.
 

horseless carriage

Well-known Member
i think it's think?!
Mixing up it's and its is an extremely common mistake. It, is a third-person singular neuter pronoun, used to stand in for inanimate things or ideas. Its is a possessive form of the pronoun it, meaning belonging to it. It's is a contraction of the words, it is or it has.

If you’re trying to figure out whether you should write it's or its, swap in it is or it has. If the sentence makes sense with either of those substitutions, use it's. If the resulting sentence doesn’t make sense, you need its.
 

Blessed

Senior Member
I think it does not matter. My son when little told me the words that worked for him and I knew what he meant. A butterfly was a flutterby, a kleenex was a neenak, shampoo was apple. Chicken on the bone was fried chicken, a flat egg was egg whites no yolk. H like pasgetti! When he was constipated he said he was complicated. I went out of town when he was four, his dad called me. The son wanted a flat egg, husband had no idea what that meant. I found it quite dear, we just need to pay attention and we will figure it out.

I had the same thing happen when my mother got dementia. She did not remember her words, If she wanted sweet after dinner it was dessert, if she wanted sweet at breakfast she wanted sugar for her oatmeal or coffee. It she wanted white she needed milk. The word flavor was for salt and pepper. If she wanted butter it was yellow.

We must take the time to listen to each other!
 

JaniceM

Well-known Member
I'm from Massachusetts. I never thought Pres. Kennedy had an accent. So, when those foreigners from far off lands, like New Jersey, got lost, they were looking for Worcester, Mass. And did they butcher that name. Locals pronounce it "Wist-ah", Mass". The one town visitors just gave up even trying to pronounce was Leicester, Mass. "Lest-ah, Mass."
BTW, I have no idea why Massachusetts people do this, but you have to add, "Mass." to a city. It's not Boston, it's "Boston, Mass". Oxford, Mass. Springfield, Mass. etc
One other Massachusetts thing is not using car directional signals. Apparently, it is akin to some religious tradition, which is scrupulously followed.
Take a try at Poughquag (NY). :ROFLMAO:
 
IN 1979 the city Mississauga here in the Toronto area had a huge railroad derailment involving a freight train loaded with chemical tank cars which caught fire, resulting in the largest evacuation of people in the history of Canada ( about 250,000 people ) . As you might expect the news media in Canada and the USA were all over the story, including the famous Walter Cronkite. The story ran for 6 days, but every time Walter read the name of the city, he managed to mangle it as Mississaugwah, despite being corrected by a number of Canadian journalists. Every time. JimB.
 
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Ronni

The motormouth ;)
Location
Nashville TN
One of the mispronunciations that bugs me is:

realitor
for
realtor

It's two syllables, not three.
Well not to split hairs, but realtor may well also be three syllables depending on how you pronounce it

Re-al-tor would be three. And the way I pronounce “real” it sounds like two syllables. So realtor would be three syllables for me

Reel-tor would be the two syllable version. Which I never say. I personally don’t know anyone who pronounces it like that.
 

JaniceM

Well-known Member
Well not to split hairs, but realtor may well also be three syllables depending on how you pronounce it

Re-al-tor would be three. And the way I pronounce “real” it sounds like two syllables. So realtor would be three syllables for me

Reel-tor would be the two syllable version. Which I never say. I personally don’t know anyone who pronounces it like that.
Me. :)
 

Devi

Senior Member
Location
East WA USA
Well, I'm not here to argue this point — whether you pronounce it "reeltor" or "re-al-tor"; it bothers me not. My point is that there is no "i" in the middle, as in realitor.
 

JaniceM

Well-known Member
we have a Worcester here.. and of course we manufacture the world famous Worcester sauce... and people almost universally call it War..sester.. we also have Leicester here in the uk too.. funnily enough no-one finds it difficult to pronounce Leicester.. which here is pronounced Lester.. but Worcester is pronounced Wooster.. and people find that difficult to pronounce for some reason..
There's a small town in Central New York State called Worcester- and that's the way it's pronounced.

I've never heard of a Leicester, and wouldn't for anything be able to pronounce it. It would probably come out "Lie-Cast-Er."
 

JaniceM

Well-known Member
I'm from Massachusetts. I never thought Pres. Kennedy had an accent. So, when those foreigners from far off lands, like New Jersey, got lost, they were looking for Worcester, Mass. And did they butcher that name. Locals pronounce it "Wist-ah", Mass". The one town visitors just gave up even trying to pronounce was Leicester, Mass. "Lest-ah, Mass."
BTW, I have no idea why Massachusetts people do this, but you have to add, "Mass." to a city. It's not Boston, it's "Boston, Mass". Oxford, Mass. Springfield, Mass. etc
One other Massachusetts thing is not using car directional signals. Apparently, it is akin to some religious tradition, which is scrupulously followed.
Massachusetts? Did any of the ladies in your family have P.S.D.S.? :ROFLMAO:
 

hollydolly

SF VIP
Location
London England
Houston

In Texas it's HUE-stun, and people in other places seem to use that pronunciation when talking about the Texas City or Sam Houston, the Texas hero, general, and politian of the 1800s.

In much of the rest of the world it's HOW-stun. Knew a guy in Florida with the first name and he pronounced it HOW-stun.
never heard it called HOW stun, that's nuts .... even here in the Uk people call it Hew stun.. or Who -stun...
 

JaniceM

Well-known Member
Houston

In Texas it's HUE-stun, and people in other places seem to use that pronunciation when talking about the Texas City or Sam Houston, the Texas hero, general, and politian of the 1800s.

In much of the rest of the world it's HOW-stun. Knew a guy in Florida with the first name and he pronounced it HOW-stun.
I've never heard it pronounced any way other than HUE-stun.. except in reference to SOHO (South Of 'Hous-ton' Street).
 


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