My disaster in home repairs

Aneeda72

Senior Member
Oh,
I sent an email to a realtor that sold my grandmother's house. Awaiting a reply.
oh, good. A flipper will take it down to the studs and then rebuild the whole thing. You can get a much better place and save your money.
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
Yes, it's been paid for for decades. My parents bought it in 1975. My father passed in 1983 and my mother didn't keep up on the maintenance for the 23 years after that she outlived him. I would often mention to her that this or that should be taken care of, but she never wanted people she didn't know working around her and disturbing her peace of mind. One time we desperately need plumbing and I went ahead and got a team to fix the clogs and leaks. When they arraived, mon barricaded herself in her bedroom until it was all over and she didn't speak to me for a week afterwards. Now I am trying to play catch-up. I've already invested thousands in the house and it doesn't look any better and problems are escalating.

One realtor that looked at it when I was considering selling said "The bones are good, but it would have to be gutted and re-done." Another indicated that I would have to put a minimum of $200K in repairs or she wouldn't even accept it for the market.
I just couldn't see paying that much to do something that another owner would just rip out an put in what they wanted.
Translation... I am a real estate agent that's looking to profit from the blood, sweat & tears of others, so the sooner I can convince this seller that their home is worthless, the sooner I can liquidate it for a song and pad my pockets with commission.

There is NO way your home needs $200K in repairs.
 

StarSong

Well-known Member
Translation... I am a real estate agent that's looking to profit from the blood, sweat & tears of others, so the sooner I can convince this seller that their home is worthless, the sooner I can liquidate it for a song and pad my pockets with commission.

There is NO way your home needs $200K in repairs.
How could you possibly know this?
 

Original Poster
I see the ads on TV all the time about companies that will "pay cash for your house in any condition". By the time they finish finding fault, you'd end up having to pay them to take it.
 
Original Poster
I did hear back from the real estate agent that sold my grandma's house:

I’m not so sure that getting a certified home inspector first is a bad idea. True, they cannot recommend contractors because of the conflict but they can inspect the entire house and prioritize the repairs that are essential and effect life-safety! I have a few inspectors that I can give you to consider if you like.

Looking at your list, there are several contractors needed. The good ones don’t “try” to do everything on a list but concentrate on their speciality...i.e., roofer, plumber, painter, mason, etc.... I would be suspicious of a contractor who tells you they could do it all!

I think a home inspector is a wise first step and will provide you with a whole house inspection that would be a good long-term planning tool for you. Those fees typically run $400./$600.

Hope this is helpful!
 
The kitchen ceiling should be fixed right away, imo
RR, I think the cause for the ceiling collapse should be found first.
Translation... I am a real estate agent that's looking to profit from the blood, sweat & tears of others, so the sooner I can convince this seller that their home is worthless, the sooner I can liquidate it for a song and pad my pockets with commission.

There is NO way your home needs $200K in repairs.
The nationwide average build price is between $100 and $155 per sq. ft. Do the math. Marg.

And as if that's not bad enough, the house sits in an area that has higher values than surrounding counties and therefore you are apt to find the average price per sq ft to be more in the $179 range.
Forget the rodent droppings's. (that's the least of the problems) Get down to the basics...
Total upgrade of electrical wiring.
Total repair of all plumbing.
Total repair of foundation (including the outside drainage problem)
Total repair of roof. If it's been leaking, I'm betting there is some sheathing damage underneath.
Total repair of brickwork and window casings. Again, there is going to be damage underneath to the sheathing.
Now, after all that, then you can start re-doing all the drywall in the house. (remember it'll be torn out for the wiring.
Of course, there is the payment of the original demolition so these repairs can be made
My advice is run away. If someone wants to gut it and start over, more power to them. For that feeling Deb, I'm so sorry, but there it is.
There is no way you can slap a coat of paint and some motor goop and sell it.
 
Original Poster
The recent ceiling problem wasn't due to water leakage. All the plaster I swept up was dry and crumbly and no drips down in the kitchen (the upstairs bathroom is directly over the kitchen). It was fairly new, too, having it re-plastered within the last 15 years when a plumber knocked part of it out to get to a clog problem. The recent situation was in the newer part. Now if you're going to ask why the plumber didn't re-plaster the ceiling, I did ask. His response was, "I'm a plumber, not a drywaller."
 
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Aneeda72

Senior Member
I did hear back from the real estate agent that sold my grandma's house:

I’m not so sure that getting a certified home inspector first is a bad idea. True, they cannot recommend contractors because of the conflict but they can inspect the entire house and prioritize the repairs that are essential and effect life-safety! I have a few inspectors that I can give you to consider if you like.

Looking at your list, there are several contractors needed. The good ones don’t “try” to do everything on a list but concentrate on their speciality...i.e., roofer, plumber, painter, mason, etc.... I would be suspicious of a contractor who tells you they could do it all!

I think a home inspector is a wise first step and will provide you with a whole house inspection that would be a good long-term planning tool for you. Those fees typically run $400./$600.

Hope this is helpful!
This is the right price for an inspection, I paid it on each house we considered buying
 

Aneeda72

Senior Member
The recent ceiling problem wasn't due to water leakage. All the plaster I swept up was dry and crumbly and no drips down in the kitchen (the upstairs bathroom is directly over the kitchen). It was fairly new, too, having it re-plastered within the last 15 years when a plumber knocked part of it out to get to a clog problem. The recent situation was in the newer part. Now if you're going to ask why the plumber didn't re-plaster the ceiling, I did ask. His response was, "I'm a plumber, not a drywaller."
We had to have a drain put in the laundry room and drainage pipes enlarged. He had to remove the drywall, of course. Now we have to pay someone to come fix it. This is typical as well. Plumbers tear it out, a drywall guy has to put it back. It’s never ending.
 

Knight

Senior Member
Oh,

oh, good. A flipper will take it down to the studs and then rebuild the whole thing. You can get a much better place and save your money.
My son did that in a small town south of Pittsburgh Pa. There and other places. He bought a disaster for $4,000.00 sold it for $118,000.00. Invested that in other places to the point of retiring at age 50 now traveling with his wife until they see all they want to see.
 

Knight

Senior Member
Top companies for Electricians in New York State
Encore Electric, Inc.
$76.15
per hour

$57.16
per hour
arab contractors

$47.31
per hour

Stones River Electric
$46.18
per hour

An example of hourly cost to upgrade the wiring. After gutting the entire home not only the wiring but the breaker box & circuit breaker cost need to be included. Why not wire the house for internet while the walls are opened up?

Depending on the age & type of the heating system that might be upgraded along with the plumbing.
How much does a Licensed Plumber make in Albany, NY? The average Licensed Plumber salary in Albany, NY is $58,300 as of May 28, 2020. The low end of $58,300 based on 2080 labor hours is $28.02 per hour. Then there are the material costs to include.

That only scratches the surface of the repair cost that could be incured.

Given the reaction to how Deb's mother reacted to people I think I'm beginning to understand why some of her posts show mistrust of her neighbors. That and the reluctence to move from where she is comfortable.

I've posted about Johnstown Pa. before only because my son & his wife plan to live there eventually when their travel is completed. If they chose a place we'll pay for it and then when they are setteled in they will pay us whatever the mortgage plus taxes would have been. I don't expect to recover the cost but their pride in paying back stays intact. So many choices to fit any budget.
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Johnstown_PA/price-na-70000
 

RadishRose

SF VIP
Location
CT USA
While the walls are opened up, I'd install central A/C and central vacuum.

Since the place is so big, I'd go with two or 3 zone heating.

Oh yes, we forgot- the house needs to be insulated!! How much will that be?
With thermal pane glass, weather stripping and multi zone heating, I bet the heating costs will be 50% of what it is now.
 

Knight

Senior Member
While the walls are opened up, I'd install central A/C and central vacuum.

Since the place is so big, I'd go with two or 3 zone heating.

Oh yes, we forgot- the house needs to be insulated!! How much will that be?
With thermal pane glass, weather stripping and multi zone heating, I bet the heating costs will be 50% of what it is now.
Exactly why not do as much as possible to live comfortably. Might even be able to look into a 2nd mortgage if that is possible ant the loan percent is low
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
RR, I think the cause for the ceiling collapse should be found first.


The nationwide average build price is between $100 and $155 per sq. ft. Do the math. Marg.

And as if that's not bad enough, the house sits in an area that has higher values than surrounding counties and therefore you are apt to find the average price per sq ft to be more in the $179 range.
Forget the rodent droppings's. (that's the least of the problems) Get down to the basics...
Total upgrade of electrical wiring.
Total repair of all plumbing.
Total repair of foundation (including the outside drainage problem)
Total repair of roof. If it's been leaking, I'm betting there is some sheathing damage underneath.
Total repair of brickwork and window casings. Again, there is going to be damage underneath to the sheathing.
Now, after all that, then you can start re-doing all the drywall in the house. (remember it'll be torn out for the wiring.
Of course, there is the payment of the original demolition so these repairs can be made
My advice is run away. If someone wants to gut it and start over, more power to them. For that feeling Deb, I'm so sorry, but there it is.
There is no way you can slap a coat of paint and some motor goop and sell it.
We average $130 - $230 per sq. ft here in Canada, but that's where you have lost me. I wasn't aware that Deb, was looking to rebuild her home, just tackle what repairs need doing, and that certainly doesn't equate to spending $100 - $155 per foot to have done.
 
We average $130 - $230 per sq. ft here in Canada, but that's where you have lost me. I wasn't aware that Deb, was looking to rebuild her home, just tackle what repairs need doing, and that certainly doesn't equate to spending $100 - $155 per foot to have done.
Just go through the entire post, (and a few others), and you'll see that in order to fix all the wrongs Deb has shown, you basically have to gut the home and start again. Anyone who has had any carpenter experience knows that what's on the surface is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to repair time. Remember, Deb cannot do these things herself, so, yes, in order to properly repair this home for either for her own safety and comfort or to get top dollar on a re-sell, she will have to deal with licence'd contractors which equates to multiple dollars being spent.
I stand by the fact that once you start into repairs, it will grow into one huge money pit.
 

Aneeda72

Senior Member
My son did that in a small town south of Pittsburgh Pa. There and other places. He bought a disaster for $4,000.00 sold it for $118,000.00. Invested that in other places to the point of retiring at age 50 now traveling with his wife until they see all they want to see.
He’s not actually traveling now, is he?
 

Aneeda72

Senior Member
Top companies for Electricians in New York State
Encore Electric, Inc.
$76.15
per hour

$57.16
per hour
arab contractors

$47.31
per hour

Stones River Electric
$46.18
per hour

An example of hourly cost to upgrade the wiring. After gutting the entire home not only the wiring but the breaker box & circuit breaker cost need to be included. Why not wire the house for internet while the walls are opened up?

Depending on the age & type of the heating system that might be upgraded along with the plumbing.
How much does a Licensed Plumber make in Albany, NY? The average Licensed Plumber salary in Albany, NY is $58,300 as of May 28, 2020. The low end of $58,300 based on 2080 labor hours is $28.02 per hour. Then there are the material costs to include.

That only scratches the surface of the repair cost that could be incured.

Given the reaction to how Deb's mother reacted to people I think I'm beginning to understand why some of her posts show mistrust of her neighbors. That and the reluctence to move from where she is comfortable.

I've posted about Johnstown Pa. before only because my son & his wife plan to live there eventually when their travel is completed. If they chose a place we'll pay for it and then when they are setteled in they will pay us whatever the mortgage plus taxes would have been. I don't expect to recover the cost but their pride in paying back stays intact. So many choices to fit any budget.
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Johnstown_PA/price-na-70000
It cost 5000 to wire a four level, two story house with basement, including 4 bedrooms living room, family room etc., 2200 square feet for cable tv. This was three years ago. Because it was bi-level Comcast wouldn’t wire it.

In our current house, we didn’t rewire the electrical, but changed all the electrical outlets, added a few outlets. We also replaced the inside electrical box and updated the outside electrical box and it cost 5000. As a one level house, Comcast wired it for cable at no charge.
 

Knight

Senior Member
He’s not actually traveling now, is he?
Yes they are on the Alcan highway headed for Alaska. BTW each home they renovated they got permits for & inspection certificates for each phase of renovation. Assuring all repairs were up to code. They are living the American dream now.
 
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Knight

Senior Member
Just go through the entire post, (and a few others), and you'll see that in order to fix all the wrongs Deb has shown, you basically have to gut the home and start again. Anyone who has had any carpenter experience knows that what's on the surface is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to repair time. Remember, Deb cannot do these things herself, so, yes, in order to properly repair this home for either for her own safety and comfort or to get top dollar on a re-sell, she will have to deal with licence'd contractors which equates to multiple dollars being spent.
I stand by the fact that once you start into repairs, it will grow into one huge money pit.
Once gutted exposing the support walls who knows what might be found? I feel sorry for Deb because the list of exposed is long what lies unseen could easily add to the cost.
 


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