Received a bill from doctor even after I paid the co-pay

debodun

Well-known Member
Original Poster
I probably shouldn't gripe over a bill that is less than $25, but it likely stems from a misunderstanding I had that between Medicare and Medigap, everything was covered. Probably these charges are co-pays left from the Medigap (United Healthcare) I have. When it says "National G crossed over to United Healthcare", does that mean Medicare fobbed it off on my Medigap?
 

Liberty

Senior Member
Location
Texas
I probably shouldn't gripe over a bill that is less than $25, but it likely stems from a misunderstanding I had that between Medicare and Medigap, everything was covered. Probably these charges are co-pays left from the Medigap (United Healthcare) I have. When it says "National G crossed over to United Healthcare", does that mean Medicare fobbed it off on my Medigap?
Who knows...we sometimes get crazy bills and then the next month they disappear. We don't pay them unless we are sure of what they are - so much corruption out there. We just ignore them and they eventually fix the finger fumbles.

I'm guessing because of the amount in your case its probably a "not registering the deductible for the year" so its a rebill. That would be my guess anyway. When you call the doctor's office it may be a "duh" we don't know - "Medicare told us to bill you this" or something...lol.
 

Judycat

Member
Location
Pennsylvania
Maybe find a different eye doctor. I suffered with someone because the place where I had been going moved out of town and sent my records to a new place. I went two times and the second time was worse than the first. I took it upon myself to find a different eye doctor and wow what a difference. Some places make you feel like an animal at the vet, that's how I describe the kind of experience you had.
 

Kaila

Senior Member
You'd think the ophthamologist would have recommended that if he noticed anything amiss.
You're right, he should have, and hopefully did,
but it is common, and I don't know for sure if that doctor is skilled and attentive to detail, or not, from what you said.

does that mean Medicare fobbed it off on my Medigap?
I don't think they can do that. Medicare had to come first, (pay first) when I was more familiar with it than now.
I don't know for certain, how the details are done now.

I see your point, Deb, that even though its not a big leftover charge for those tests, that between both insurances, it seems like you shouldn't have more co-pay left, but I don't know.

It is interesting what @Liberty said though, about the bill, so it's worth waiting, and not paying now, and trying to confirm (with that office or better, with one of the insurances) that you truly owe the remaining amount.
 

Kaila

Senior Member
Maybe find a different eye doctor. I suffered with someone because the place where I had been going moved out of town and sent my records to a new place. I went two times and the second time was worse than the first. I took it upon myself to find a different eye doctor and wow what a difference
I agree that it's easier to switch and find a new eye doctor, than other types of doctors, IF you decide to,

and to have your records of the eye tests that you had, sent to the new one, since the insurances will not cover them twice so soon, but it is much easier to do with eye doctors, than it is, to find and switch to a different GP.
 

Kaila

Senior Member
Oh you are right, plus I also momentarily forgot that they all have long waits for next appointments, now too!
 

debodun

Well-known Member
Original Poster
Even established patients usually have to wait up to six months for doctor appts. I tell my doctors that by that time I'll either be better or dead. Usually after an office visit, they insist on scheduling a follow-up to avoid confusion. Sometimes I can't plan that far ahead.
 

Liberty

Senior Member
Location
Texas
Even established patients usually have to wait up to six months for doctor appts. I tell my doctors that by that time I'll either be better or dead. Usually after an office visit, they insist on scheduling a follow-up to avoid confusion. Sometimes I can't plan that far ahead.
You gotta be kidding. Down here we can call a doc and get in very quickly as far as I know. Of course we are near the largest medical facilities in the country.
Over 100,000 people work daily at the Harris County Med Center in H Town. Have never heard of any medicare patient being turned down by a doc. It must be way different in areas around the country.
 

debodun

Well-known Member
Original Poster
My PCP is very difficult to get an appointment with on short notice. I'm usually given a date about 6 weeks away. Of course, they say if they get a cancellation, I'll be bumped up on her waiting list. Of course, with only two doctor's offices in a town of over 5000 plus surrounding communities, I am not surprised at that.
 

Kaila

Senior Member
Some of the medical practices here, (northern USA) accept a limited percentage of their patients, at any one time, to have Medicare. And there are also some who do not take it. :cautious:

Both of which, make the waits longer for those doctors who do accept it, and for patients who need to use it.:confused:

The wait lists for appointments vary here, but can be long, for established patients too, and even longer for new ones.:oops:
 

Liberty

Senior Member
Location
Texas
We use our cardiologist as our primary care physician. He does all the blood work. Yikes, are you close to any major cities that you could see a doc sooner and establish an ongoing relationship with the medical care facilities in that area?
 

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