221-B Baker Street

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA USA
Original Poster
Sherlock Holmes was the original technology disrupter

"Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a futurist, living at a time and place when the technology of the industrial revolution was radically transforming people’s lives. Many of the concepts he wrote about in Sherlock Holmes’s fictitious adventures formed the basis for pioneering forensics techniques that are still in use today. But the relationship between his best-known character and technological innovation goes beyond the techniques employed in the stories—Sherlock Holmes himself is technological disruption personified."
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA USA
Original Poster
Sherlock Holmes sculpture by John Doubleday, at Meiringen, Switzerland, near the Reichenbach waterfalls, where Holmes faces his nemesis Professor Moriarty
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA USA
Original Poster
The Remarkable Worm: Sherlock Holmes at DMNS (LINK)


It was a blustery afternoon at 221B Baker Street when Holmes and I heard the tell-tale sound of a carriage pulling up sharply in front of the building. After a moment, Holmes murmured “If I’m not mistake, that’ll be a young man come to tell us about a new exhibit at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Watson.”

I was shocked. Even for Holmes, that was a leap of deductive reasoning. Guessing it was someone coming to visit my illustrious colleague, that was easy, and ascertaining age and gender from the footfalls and speed with which he dashed up the stairs I’d experienced before with my good friend, but how the deuce could he know the topic of our upcoming conversation?

“Confound it, Holmes, how do you know it’s related to the Denver museum, a city thousands of miles away from our abode here in London?”

Holmes smiled his damndable smile and pointed to the door, as Mrs. Hudson opened it and in her shrill East London accent informed us “A visitor for you, Mr. ‘olmes. From Denver. America!”

Behind her stood the most remarkable young man, harried and dressed in quite unfashionable clothing and footwear that I’d never seen before with white laces and what appeared to be gum arabic soles.

In his deep voice he looked at Holmes and said “Yes, just as I expected you’d look. Splendid”, he rubbed his hands together, smiled and said “let me tell you two gentleman about the Case of the Remarkable Worm”, just to be interrupted by Holmes laughing and saying “Why yes, sir, I believe the game truly is afoot!”
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Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
PA USA
Original Poster
Pigging Out on Sherlock Holmes (LINK)


"As the story begins, Freddy the pig is shadowing his fellow animals on the Bean farm. "I got the idea," he says, "from a book I found in the barn, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. It's the best book I've come across in a long time, and you'll admit I know something about literature."

"He finds himself working to solve a real mystery when the toy train belonging to the human boy and girl on the farm disappears. He unearths clues, including green paint scratches and grey hairs, and eventually brings the crime home to the perpetrators, old Simon the rat (Freddy's Moriarty) and his criminous family. It takes a while, though: "Even Sherlock Holmes couldn't do everything in a minute," Freddy tells Jinx defensively. There are, of course, complications and subplots, including the appearance of a "city detective," provocatively named Montague Boner."

"Freddy the Detective was published by Knopf in 1932. It was the third book in the Freddy series, but the first to set what became a pattern in the ensuing two decades with Freddy the Magician, Freddy Goes Camping, Freddy the Pilot, and so on. There have been a number of subsequent editions of Detective, and it is now in print from Overlook Press. "
 

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