Do you talk more or less than when you were younger?

Fyrefox

Token fox furry
I think I talked more as a kid; children tend to babble, and vie more with their peers to get a word in, which gives them a feeling of control, and raises their status in the kid pecking order as someone who knows about “stuff.”

I talk less as an adult, especially in retirement, as there’s less social contact, and no work-related communication needs. Plus if you talk more to certain people, it only encourages them to talk more! I value my peace and quiet highly…there’s no use doing a lot of barking if you don’t have much to say… 🤫
 

David777

Member
Location
Silicon Valley
During some periods of my childhood yes, during others no. Depended upon available others. My mother was a very popular natural chatterbox with her friends and I've got some of that in me. My dad moved a lot so I learned how to talk to unfamiliar others. However as a young adult studied proper communication and learned to balance listening and speaking as well as when to talk and when to remain silent. In the corporate work world, professionals don't have time for unnecessary blabbering nor to those with a habit of interrupting others while they are trying to speak. For most of my adult life have had little issue talking to even large groups of other strangers as am a little guy with a strong confident voice that tends to choose his words carefully just as I write. A secondary reason I'm on this forum and some others is for repeating language skills that is necessary to retain them lest they degenerate due to the way brain neural plasticity works.

As a resort solo winter snow skier, one continually sits on chairlifts with strangers from A to Z of all ages even young kids. So in winters I get plenty of practice talking with others then if they want to. And then there are other times in my life when I have been relatively isolated for months like between jobs when I took off and roamed for weeks in wilderness. In recent months due to my polycythemia vera condition, I've not had as much opportunity speaking to others so occasionally will spend an hour or two reading speaking out loud practicing clear English enunciation. Although one's brain may be able to read, think, and write language, unless one regularly practices using vocal motor brain muscles, such can degenerate leaving one slurring words.
 
Last edited:

Kika

Member
Location
NYC
As a child, I was very quiet and did not talk much at all. As an adult I became more outgoing and talked a LOT. Now as a senior I enjoy my peace and quiet and don't talk much unless I'm with people I know well and feel very comfortable around them.
 

David777

Member
Location
Silicon Valley
Talk a lot less to other people and a lot more to myself. When I'm outside, I pretend I'm talking to my cats so's people won't think I'm nuts. I guess I could put in ear buds and pretend I'm talking on the phone, but then I'd have to haul that cursed thing around with me, blah don't want to do that.
As someone that hikes and backpacks in wilderness, I regularly speak towards animals and birds and at home likewise to walker's pet dogs. Animals have a significant sense of other creatures looking with their eyes directly at them, facial expressions, voice, and body language that I like to think they have awareness of when I do so. Around my very urban neighborhood are many tree climbing eastern red squirrels and crows. Usually they are afraid of any others getting anywhere close to them. Interestingly most seem to be aware I am one human they don't need to run from and often look quizzically at me as I pass only say 3 feet from hearing my calm voice. In the same way, species out in nature understand what other creatures they don't need to fear and allow moving close to.
 

Judycat

Well-known Member
Location
Pennsylvania
As someone that hikes and backpacks in wilderness, I regularly speak towards animals and birds and at home likewise to walker's pet dogs. Animals have a significant sense of other creatures looking with their eyes directly at them, facial expressions, voice, and body language that I like to think they have awareness of when I do so. Around my very urban neighborhood are many tree climbing eastern red squirrels and crows. Usually they are afraid of any others getting anywhere close to them. Interestingly most seem to be aware I am one human they don't need to run from and often look quizzically at me as I pass only say 3 feet from hearing my calm voice. In the same way, species out in nature understand what other creatures they don't need to fear and allow moving close to.
I've been talking to a spider hanging out around my gate for a week or so. I just greet him by saying, hey buddy, and tell him not to worry, he's not bothering me and he can go ahead and hang there as long as he wants. He's a pretty big guy and he's always there when I use the gate so I guess he knows it's OK.
 


Top