Study: Little benefit for vitamin D, omega-3, exercise in seniors

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
Vit D is useful if you're like me and stay out of the sun. Wayyyy out of the sun, and have for decades.

For bone density I take chelated calcium-magnesium. Also for decades, ever since I became allergic to milk at age 20.

When I finally managed to wrangle a bone density test out of my HMO at age 57, I was congratulated on having the bone density of a 23 yr old.

My elder sister had asked me to get a bone density test as she was diagnosed with osteoporosis that was apparently caused by malfunctioning parathyroids. Like me she took cal-mag supplements, but in her case the glandular malfunction caused calcium to just circulate around in her blood, rather than deposit it into the bones.

No one had any idea anything was wrong (no symptoms, obviously) until bones started breaking in her feet - she was an ICU nurse. As she weighs maybe 85 lbs soaking wet they had to search for a cause for almost two years before finally doing the surgery!

It's always best to eat a healthy diet. But very few people DO eat a completely healthy diet, day in and day out. And as you age, you eat less and less. This does not even take into consideration your digestive process slows down and becomes less efficient at getting nutrients out of the food you are eating.

I watched my MIL as she aged and her diet was atrocious. All she concentrated on was salt and portion size. She was the perfect weight for her height, but nutritionally she was a disaster. Finally one day she fainted from low blood sugar (she wasn't diabetic) and I had to insist she start drinking a liquid protein supplement every day.
I learned many years ago that eating a healthy diet is really not complicated. If 80% of your diet comes from raw, unprocessed fruits & vegetables, you're eating a healthy diet.
 

Aneeda72

Well-known Member
I learned many years ago that eating a healthy diet is really not complicated. If 80% of your diet comes from raw, unprocessed fruits & vegetables, you're eating a healthy diet.
But you have to be ABLE to digest a raw diet, something I can not do. No fruits, no carbs-diabetic, no fiber-gastroparesis, and don’t get me started on protein, protein kills me. Finally had to start drinking a protein drink. It’s been suggested I start eating baby food. 🙁🤮.

So, while eating a healthy diet is uncomplicated for you, for me it’s a nightmare. As usual, generalizations and blanket statements are silly. I learned many years ago, that my life was an ongoing medical nightmare as is true for many people.
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
But you have to be ABLE to digest a raw diet, something I can not do. No fruits, no carbs-diabetic, no fiber-gastroparesis, and don’t get me started on protein, protein kills me. Finally had to start drinking a protein drink. It’s been suggested I start eating baby food. 🙁🤮.

So, while eating a healthy diet is uncomplicated for you, for me it’s a nightmare. As usual, generalizations and blanket statements are silly. I learned many years ago, that my life was an ongoing medical nightmare as is true for many people.
Well, I'm also diabetic. I have 2 - 3 servings of fruit per day. The notion that fruit is bad for diabetics is wrong, IMO. A medium-sized fruit (like an apple or orange has 12 - 15 gms carbs & also has needed fiber & vitamins. Non-starchy vegetables have hardly any carbs & even more vitamins & micronutrients that can prevent/minimize the damage caused by diabetes.
What is bad for diabetics (and everyone else) is processed foods - bread, pasta, chips, etc.
If your doctor told you to avoid fruit due to digestive issues, that's puzzling to me because fruit is very quickly & easily digested. And isn't baby food simply fruit & vegetables that have been blended?
 

Aneeda72

Well-known Member
Well, I'm also diabetic. I have 2 - 3 servings of fruit per day. The notion that fruit is bad for diabetics is wrong, IMO. A medium-sized fruit (like an apple or orange has 12 - 15 gms carbs & also has needed fiber & vitamins. Non-starchy vegetables have hardly any carbs & even more vitamins & micronutrients that can prevent/minimize the damage caused by diabetes.
What is bad for diabetics (and everyone else) is processed foods - bread, pasta, chips, etc.
If your doctor told you to avoid fruit due to digestive issues, that's puzzling to me because fruit is very quickly & easily digested. And isn't baby food simply fruit & vegetables that have been blended?
I am not to eat fruit due to being diabetic. Due gastroparesis, I am down to two small meals a day and sometimes a protein drink for dinner if I can stuff it in. Bread helps my stomach so I am eating it. I no longer care about my blood sugar. Let me whine a bit, I am in stomach pain hell. Hungry all the time. So there you go.
 

AnnieA

Senior Member
Location
Down South
My doctor gave me a prescription for vitamin D; not the over-the-counter kind. I figured it can't hurt and it isn't too expensive. My first thought was that big pharma is trying to make up for lost opioid revenue.

Call and see what your levels were. The difference in over the counter and RX Vitamin D3 is strength. I think 10,000 IU is max for OTC, prescription is 50,000 IU.

Since nearly every study done on Covid outcomes and Vit D levels shows that low levels correlate with hospitalizations and poor outcomes, you need to know why your doctor wants you on so high a dose. It may be that your levels or low or that he wants you to take a higher dose periodically instead of everyday. If the latter, you can just buy OTC and take daily if it's cheaper than RX. Sometimes higher dose RX works out to be cheaper in the end.
 

win231

Well-known Member
Location
CA
I saw something interesting about floaters. I've been trying it for a couple of weeks & noting some improvement:
 

Chet

Member
Location
PA, USA
Call and see what your levels were. The difference in over the counter and RX Vitamin D3 is strength. I think 10,000 IU is max for OTC, prescription is 50,000 IU.

Since nearly every study done on Covid outcomes and Vit D levels shows that low levels correlate with hospitalizations and poor outcomes, you need to know why your doctor wants you on so high a dose. It may be that your levels or low or that he wants you to take a higher dose periodically instead of everyday. If the latter, you can just buy OTC and take daily if it's cheaper than RX. Sometimes higher dose RX works out to be cheaper in the end.
I don't trust OTC since anyone can put Vitamin D on a bottle and market it. There are snake oil salesmen out there. My vitamin D levels were tested as low, so my doctor prescribed 12 capsules of 1.25 mg. to be taken one per week till gone.
 

Aneeda72

Well-known Member
Very interesting.

I'd experienced miniscule floaters in my eyes for as long as I can remember, and the condition always resolves itself with time.
I have a large floater and it can block my vision, but I can’t drive right now so it doesn’t matter that much. When I am forced to get surgery on my other eye, when I have no choice, then during that surgery he will remove that floater. But I have more pressing issues right now.
 

Aunt Marg

Granny Pantie Power!
I have a large floater and it can block my vision, but I can’t drive right now so it doesn’t matter that much. When I am forced to get surgery on my other eye, when I have no choice, then during that surgery he will remove that floater. But I have more pressing issues right now.
Holy smokes. I didn't realize floaters can get so large.
 

AnnieA

Senior Member
Location
Down South
I don't trust OTC since anyone can put Vitamin D on a bottle and market it. There are snake oil salesmen out there. My vitamin D levels were tested as low, so my doctor prescribed 12 capsules of 1.25 mg. to be taken one per week till gone.

Due to autoimmune diseases and a genetic mutation that causes me not to utilize Vitamin D properly, I run low levels if I slack off D3 supplements. A few years ago, I broke a bone and it was not healing as it should. I got D levels tested, started faithfully taking D3 supplements and it finally healed. I had levels tested frequently during that time and they went up taking Vitacost brand supplements. I only order from them. They also carry other brands but their 'store' brand is cheaper and my levels went up taking them.
 
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Remy

New Member
Location
California, USA
I take vitamin D and a multivitamin but not on a daily basis. I figure it can't hurt. Is it lining the makers pocket, perhaps.
 


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