Alaska Airways Flight 66 Hits Bear While Landing At Yakutat Airport

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
I remember the time when I was behind a Japan Airlines’ 747 coming in from Tokyo and him and I were both communicating with the ATC for landing instructions. The Japanese pilot had a hard time saying the word “three,” instead, he said “flee” I think he was flight 433, so when we are finished speaking to the Controller, we end by giving our flight number.

So, the Controller tells him “Turn left, heading 1-8-0 and clear to land, 2-4 Right.” The Japanese pilot answered by repeating the instructions that were just given to him by saying “Turn lef, heading 1-8-0, queer to land, 2-4-white.” Japan Air four-flee-flee.”

The F/O and I looked at each other and had a good laugh. It was really funny over the radio.
 

Last edited:

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
I remember the time when I was behind a Japan Airlines’ 747 coming in from Tokyo and him and I were both communicating with the ATC for landing instructions. The Japanese pilot had a hard time saying the word “three,” instead, he said “flee” I think he was flight 433, so when we are finished speaking to the Controller, we end by giving our flight number.

So, the Controller tells him “Turn left, heading 1-8-0 and clear to land, 2-4 Right.” The Japanese pilot answered by repeating the instructions that were just given to him by saying “Turn lef, heading 1-8-0, queer to land, 2-4-white.” Japan Air four-flee-flee.”

The F/O and I looked at each other and had a good laugh. It was really funny over the radio.

f9f5e091402a9fe0ce435580523255d2.gif

ATC: Read back please

747: Weed back preez

ATC: Cross enough
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
The ATC's at Kennedy used to be really funny on the slower nights when there wasn't a lot of traffic. On one of those slow nights, there was an American and Continental planes using the same taxiway out to their designated runway. One was behind the other with about 400 feet between them. Ground ATC was guiding them out. If I remember correctly, they had to make three turns to get out to the proper runway because of the direction of their scheduled takeoff. This was on a Wednesday before Thanksgiving.

The ATC gave instructions something like, "American 408, take Bravo to X-ray and turn left onto Whiskey and hold. DO NOT cross the active runway. Continental 600, follow the American and maintain proper distancing." Everything went OK, until the American came to a complete stop. The ATC radioed the American and asked the pilot why he stopped in the middle of the taxiway. The pilot radioed back to the ATC and told him that there was a gaggle of geese walking across the taxiway and heading for the runway and if he didn't get someone out here in a hurry, we would soon be having goose for Thanksgiving.

After a long silence, The ATC came back onto the radio and said, "Everyone stop where you are until we get this figured out." Then, another long silence. The ATC again talks by asking the question, "What the Hell is a gaggle of geese?" After that, maybe eight pilots let the ATC have it with all kinds of silly remarks.
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
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Hey oldman. Lots of USStratcom EAM's on 11175 khz and 8992 khz lately. I mean lots. We're talking nonstop EAM's consisting of several dozen to 200+ letter/numbers transmissions out of Andrews.

Go to k3fef.com/:8901 click on the green Chrome extension icon on the right side of the screen then select 25 meters then click on skyking-5 on the left of the waterfall spectrum display. Don't click on the squelch icon as the atmospherics are pretty bad lately.

You can listen to EAM's from the last week at EAM.watch.

FlightRadar24.com says a USN E-4B' here on the East coast is simulcasting on 364.2 MHz which I am not too sure of since it's a National NORAD AWACS circuit. Too far for me to hear.
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
Hey oldman. Lots of USStratcom EAM's on 11175 khz and 8992 khz lately. I mean lots. We're talking nonstop EAM's consisting of several dozen to 200+ letter/numbers transmissions out of Andrews.

Go to k3fef.com/:8901 click on the green Chrome extension icon on the right side of the screen then select 25 meters then click on skyking-5 on the left of the waterfall spectrum display. Don't click on the squelch icon as the atmospherics are pretty bad lately.

You can listen to EAM's from the last week at EAM.watch.

FlightRadar24.com says a USN E-4B' here on the East coast is simulcasting on 364.2 MHz which I am not too sure of since it's a National NORAD AWACS circuit. Too far for me to hear.

OOPS Here ya go

www.k3fef.com:8901

I only use his site because it is consistent and he sets no time out or refresh disconnects.
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
What’s pretty cool about these numerous wavelengths is that sometimes they cross over. For example, I can be listening to sky talk and maybe just for a few seconds, I will get some shortwave feeds. How these signals crossover has always been a mystery to me.

We had just taken off from Denver and had completed our communications with Denver Center and tuned the radio to pick up feed from Salt Lake City Center when we received some mumble jumble from a kid for about a minute. We had to warn him that he was on an illegal frequency and if he didn’t clear the channel, he may be getting a visit from the FBI. He exited in a hurry.
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
What’s pretty cool about these numerous wavelengths is that sometimes they cross over. For example, I can be listening to sky talk and maybe just for a few seconds, I will get some shortwave feeds. How these signals crossover has always been a mystery to me.

We had just taken off from Denver and had completed our communications with Denver Center and tuned the radio to pick up feed from Salt Lake City Center when we received some mumble jumble from a kid for about a minute. We had to warn him that he was on an illegal frequency and if he didn’t clear the channel, he may be getting a visit from the FBI. He exited in a hurry.

Like other services a growing number of listeners are getting commercial grade transceivers which have much better reception than consumer grade scanners and receivers. However the problem lies with those that know it's not illegal to purchase and possess them but is a strict Federal crime to transmit on them but they are neglectful when they don't disable the transmit function on them or have the seller's tech handle that. A new problem has now surfaced recently since the George Floyd protest now that CCR has hit the market. NYPD has been constantly plagued with bogus radio calls.

https://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/Budget_and_Entry_Level_transceivers
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
I am sick with COVID right now, so I spent some of my very free time listening to more of the chatter. We get to hear some interesting things just by chance. Some of it makes no sense because I didn't get to hear the full conversation.

What is the difference between LSB and USB? I know the frequencies change, but does one particular group use one or the other? I remember when one of my uncle's had a gorgeous boat, about a 45 footer and he used shortwave on his boat, along with two other radios, plus one for the Coast Guard. He had a lot of technical gadgets onboard, which impressed me. I was only 18 at the time. When we would go out fishing on Lake Erie, we would go from one side of the lake to the other. He moored his boat just east of Cleveland in Lakeside, I believe.

I think he used Upper Side Band on open water and Lower Side Band when near the shoreline. That's what made me ask the question of what's the difference. My guess is that USB has higher frequencies, but maybe there is more to it than that.
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
Like other services a growing number of listeners are getting commercial grade transceivers which have much better reception than consumer grade scanners and receivers. However the problem lies with those that know it's not illegal to purchase and possess them but is a strict Federal crime to transmit on them but they are neglectful when they don't disable the transmit function on them or have the seller's tech handle that. A new problem has now surfaced recently since the George Floyd protest now that CCR has hit the market. NYPD has been constantly plagued with bogus radio calls.

https://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/Budget_and_Entry_Level_transceivers
As long as consumers only purchase the receiver, no problem. It ‘used’ to be necessary to have a license to purchase a transmitter or transponder. Way back in the day, a small group of us kids in high school had CB radios. They were a lot of fun. I had a Midland 23, a Browning Golden Eagle 40 and a Contact 23. You could always tell when you were speaking with someone who was on a Browning Golden Eagle. When the sender squeezed the mic button, it sounded a “ping” before you heard anything else. That radio was the Cadillac at that time.

When I had my first radio, I put up a kind of sleazy, cheap antenna. My dad, who was in the Army, came home from wherever he was, asked about it. I told him all about it and a few days later when I came home from school, he had a really nice long range antenna installed. Then, he sent for his license and even put a small Midland radio in his car. Next, I met a guy online that sold boosters, which were illegal, but I bought one from him. That allowed me to speak with guys from like Ohio, Tennessee and other places.

At that time, CB radios could only push out 5 watts. Later, the FCC reduced it to 4 watts. The booster pushed out about 20 watts.
I still remember my call sign—KMG1749. The FCC never considered CB’er’s as problematic.
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
I am sick with COVID right now, so I spent some of my very free time listening to more of the chatter. We get to hear some interesting things just by chance. Some of it makes no sense because I didn't get to hear the full conversation.

What is the difference between LSB and USB? I know the frequencies change, but does one particular group use one or the other? I remember when one of my uncle's had a gorgeous boat, about a 45 footer and he used shortwave on his boat, along with two other radios, plus one for the Coast Guard. He had a lot of technical gadgets onboard, which impressed me. I was only 18 at the time. When we would go out fishing on Lake Erie, we would go from one side of the lake to the other. He moored his boat just east of Cleveland in Lakeside, I believe.

I think he used Upper Side Band on open water and Lower Side Band when near the shoreline. That's what made me ask the question of what's the difference. My guess is that USB has higher frequencies, but maybe there is more to it than that.

As long as consumers only purchase the receiver, no problem. It ‘used’ to be necessary to have a license to purchase a transmitter or transponder. Way back in the day, a small group of us kids in high school had CB radios. They were a lot of fun. I had a Midland 23, a Browning Golden Eagle 40 and a Contact 23. You could always tell when you were speaking with someone who was on a Browning Golden Eagle. When the sender squeezed the mic button, it sounded a “ping” before you heard anything else. That radio was the Cadillac at that time.

When I had my first radio, I put up a kind of sleazy, cheap antenna. My dad, who was in the Army, came home from wherever he was, asked about it. I told him all about it and a few days later when I came home from school, he had a really nice long range antenna installed. Then, he sent for his license and even put a small Midland radio in his car. Next, I met a guy online that sold boosters, which were illegal, but I bought one from him. That allowed me to speak with guys from like Ohio, Tennessee and other places.

At that time, CB radios could only push out 5 watts. Later, the FCC reduced it to 4 watts. The booster pushed out about 20 watts.
I still remember my call sign—KMG1749. The FCC never considered CB’er’s as problematic.

Gaer told everybody you caught a case of the Corona-cooties yesterday. She's always on the top of her game with looking out for us. I just got back from stocking up on supplies for the second wave of the Corona-cooties pandemic. I see you're getting me started again with our radio thing. I'll get back with you later today. 73's Ahm gone.

6b2fbe0debfcc0fe6fdda130a3e3729a.gif
 


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