Around The Bend

hellomimi

Member
Location
Southern CA
Moon River Waiting round the bend

"Moon River" is a song composed by Henry Mancini with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. It was originally performed by Audrey Hepburn in the 1961 movie Breakfast at Tiffany's, winning an Academy Award for Best Original Song”.


“Comments about the lyrics have noted that they are particularly reminiscent of Mercer's youth in the Southern United States and his longing to expand his horizons. An inlet near Savannah, Johnny Mercer's hometown, was named Moon River in honor of him and this song”.



The history of Henry Mancini's Moon River

...there's such a lot of World to see!
Moon River sang by Andy William's is my all time favorite. I watched him in Branson, MO years ago. This song brings back happy memories with my dad.
 

drifter

Senior Member
Location
Oklahoma
You got some good stuff here, Meanderer. I've often wondered, seeing much of yor work here and over yonder on the lower plateau, how do you find all the stuff you use (in no way is the word stuff detrimental). Do you have a lifetime of video inventory or do you stay up and a wake till the wee hours, searching he world over via the internet. I have mentioned to others here in my physical world that you no doubt could find a video or a cartoon of almost any subject thought one might think of. And, I suspect you have worn more than one hat.
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
USA
Original Poster
Bending time and space with Splice Boys (LINK)


"FOEC sits down with the Australian photographers behind the Shanghai-based camera array used to capture the time slice shots for Roy Chow & Sammo Hung’s latest martial arts epic, Rise of the Legend. Time slice (or bullet time) has evolved beyond its first appearance in The Matrix and Shanghai’s Splice Boys are at the forefront of exploring the possibilities and limitations of this prohibitively complex photographic technique."
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
USA
Original Poster
Charlie Brown's Mother's voice, was played by a trombone!


Mom

Charlie Brown’s Mother – Why Kids Don’t Hear Us Anymore (Link to blog)
"When I watched Charlie Brown as a kid, I remember thinking that the mother had nothing interesting to add to the real important story that was happening closer to ground level. Her words were, “Wah-wah, wah-wah…” and totally undecipherable. Whatever she was saying was not relevant. It’s funny in the cartoon because it’s so true".
 

Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
USA
Original Poster
"I had to go to France to appreciate Iowa." - Grant Wood, Painter

"In August 1930, Grant Wood, (Feb 13, 1891 - Feb 12, 1942) an American painter with European training, was driven around Eldon, Iowa, by a young painter from Eldon, John Sharp. Looking for inspiration, Wood noticed the Dibble House, a small white house built in the Carpenter Gothic architectural style. Sharp's brother suggested in 1973 that it was on this drive that Wood first sketched the house on the back of an envelope. Wood's earliest biographer, Darrell Garwood, noted that Wood "thought it a form of borrowed pretentiousness, a structural absurdity, to put a Gothic-style window in such a flimsy frame house".

At the time, Wood classified it as one of the "cardboardy frame houses on Iowa farms" and considered it "very paintable". After obtaining permission from Selma Jones-Johnston and her family, the house's owners, Wood made a sketch the next day in oil on paperboard from the house's front yard. This sketch displayed a steeper roof and a longer window with a more pronounced ogive than on the actual house, features which eventually adorned the final work".
(MORE)


Self portrait 1932


American Gothic 1930


Nan Wood Graham and Dr. Byron McKeeby


The Dibble House


Gothic-revival-528951074-crop-5943f40e3df78c537b93d07e.jpg
 
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Meanderer

Senior Meanderer
Location
USA
Original Poster
American Gothic House From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Charles A. Dibble (born 1836 in Saratoga County, New York), by various accounts a railroad man, livery stable owner, and Civil War veteran, lived in Eldon in the late nineteenth century. He and his wife, Catharine, began building the house in 1881 for themselves and their eight children. Its relatively simple board-and-batten siding, white color, and moderate size—just 504 square feet (46.8 m2)—were quite common in nineteenth century Iowa architecture".

"A similar style can be observed in the birthplace of President Herbert Hoover in West Branch, built a decade before the American Gothic House, which features board-and-batten siding, a simple shingled roof, a central chimney, white color, and a moderate size as well. Unique and unusual exterior features of the house include its two Gothic windows in the gable and its steep-pitched roof. Both features would later be exaggerated by Grant Wood in American Gothic. The lower floor of the house contains three rooms and a bathroom, while the upper floor has two bedrooms. The house has been called the best-known example of a Carpenter Gothic cottage in the United States".



The exterior of the small home. Visible damage is seen near the front porch foundation, although restoration is also evident in metallic reinforcement of the shingled roof and chimney area.

"This side view evinces the modest size of the house; it also obscures most of the home's addition to give a glimpse of the original design".

"There is no conclusive evidence explaining why the Dibbles chose to place Gothic windows on the upper level".


"The windows are believed to have been purchased through the Sears catalog".


"There are two commonly accepted theories: the Dibbles may have wanted the windows to beautify their home at a time when rural life in Iowa was a struggle, or they could have been following a trend in which extravagant details were desirable in residences in the late nineteenth century, and the Dibbles chose windows whose costs would have been relatively reasonable at the time."

"The Dibbles' house was foreclosed around 1897 after they were unable to pay their taxes, and they are recorded as living in Portland, Oregon, in the 1900 Census. It changed hands several times until 1917, when Gideon and Mary Hart Jones purchased it. The Jones family owned the house until 1933 (and notably added a kitchen which created the west wing of the house); thus, it was the Jones family who allowed Grant Wood to use their home as a backdrop for American Gothic."
 

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