The Vietnam War

I wanted to ask if any of you Vietnam Vets know or remember the name of those small snakes that were poisonous? I later learned from a Captain that they could kill a man in less than 15 seconds. Can a snakebite venom travel that fast through our system? I was young, so maybe thatā€™s why I believed him.
Probably not 15 seconds, but, the bamboo viper can definitely kill you if not treated quickly.
Trudging through the jungle and you head into a bamboo stand or some elephant grass. Now, you have to not only watch for the enemy, you have our old friend the Bamboo Pit Viper. A cute little fellow not more than about 12 inches long and not bigger around then your finger. However, when this little guy who hangs out in bamboo or elephant grass bites you, the wound is extremely painful, as if you had been branded with a hot iron, and the pain does not subside until about 24 hours after being bitten. Within a few minutes of being bitten, the surrounding flesh dies and turns black, highlighting the puncture wounds. The wound site quickly swells and the skin and muscle become black due to necrosis. To say you need first aid quickly is an understatement.

viper.jpg
 

Mat

New Member
My platoon leader and Pilot made a DVD some years ago and gave one to all of us that were still in touch. He was still flying two years ago but I think he is probably slowing down a bit. He was a 1st Lieutenant when we flew together and he retired a full colonel. He left RVN the same time I came home on Christmas Leave 68, at that time he was sent to fly for the Air Defense Command San Francisco. There were a lot of us Nike People spread out after 68 because the US scrapped the Nike Defense system, it was costly and outdated. I also had a captain who was for a time executive officer of the 121st which I joined after returning from Christmas Leave. He was married to a woman that was raised less than 4 miles from the Nike site I was stationed at. In a little town called Venus on highway 160, it was the short cut to the base if coming from Dallas to the base. It's a small world out there
1
https://streamable.com/7exlk3
2
https://streamable.com/lvq76e
3
https://streamable.com/suolyo
4
https://streamable.com/0ct14s
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
Probably not 15 seconds, but, the bamboo viper can definitely kill you if not treated quickly.
Trudging through the jungle and you head into a bamboo stand or some elephant grass. Now, you have to not only watch for the enemy, you have our old friend the Bamboo Pit Viper. A cute little fellow not more than about 12 inches long and not bigger around then your finger. However, when this little guy who hangs out in bamboo or elephant grass bites you, the wound is extremely painful, as if you had been branded with a hot iron, and the pain does not subside until about 24 hours after being bitten. Within a few minutes of being bitten, the surrounding flesh dies and turns black, highlighting the puncture wounds. The wound site quickly swells and the skin and muscle become black due to necrosis. To say you need first aid quickly is an understatement.

View attachment 133901
We had quite a few men get bitten by snakes and if I remember correctly, a few died. I was in a fairly good size Battalion. One of the Marines that was in the same patrol as I was on a really hot, humid night was bitten. He told me later that the bite hurt worse than any other part of it. He didn't know what kind of snake it was because he never saw it, but he did say they gave him something like seven or eight doses of antivenom and plenty of antibiotics. He thought he was going home, but he recovered too quickly. That's what he was told.

How can they give someone antivenom if they didn't identify the species of the snake? Just wondering now that I think about it.
 

jerry old

redneck, but brainy
sounds like they gave him ever antivenom they had, hoping they would get the right one.

Yes, you get bit by a rattlesnake, you have to tell doc what kind on snake it was...
Physician's insist , 'we have to know.'
Or course that is here in America, during peacetime-assume it is quite different when you in
an area where people want to kill you.

will goggle, 'does doc have to know what kind of snake bit you?
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
sounds like they gave him ever antivenom they had, hoping they would get the right one.

Yes, you get bit by a rattlesnake, you have to tell doc what kind on snake it was...
Physician's insist , 'we have to know.'
Or course that is here in America, during peacetime-assume it is quite different when you in
an area where people want to kill you.

will goggle, 'does doc have to know what kind of snake bit you?
I looked it up on Google and could not find a specific answer, but I did read a line that stated even a non-poisonous snake may be deadly due to infection and that triggered a memory.

I was in elementary school and maybe I was in 5th or 6th grade at the time. There was a girl in my class that lived in a house on the other end of the village. She was picking strawberries on day and a black snake bit her. We all know that black snakes are non-venomous. The next day, she became very ill and towards evening, she became worse and was vomiting and had high fever. Her Dad took her to the Emergency Room at the hospital. Of course, they ran a series of questions by the parents and the Mom finally told them that she was bitten by a snake just the day before.

The doctors ran with that. After they did some blood tests, they found out that she had some type of blood infection caused by the snake bite. They admitted her to the hospital and for I don't know how many days it was, but they had dripped a lot of different antibiotics into her. The family was told by the head Doctor that she probably wasn't going to survive. She was lapsing in and out of conscientiousness. Miraculously, she survived, but wasn't like she was before. I remember her not being well a lot and she didn't talk coherently at times. The family moved away about a year later. Maybe I should look her up on Facebook. I had a crush on her for maybe a year, but she never liked me as a boyfriend because I was too tall.

I did ask her parents why did she get so sick from that snake bite. Her Dad told me that snakes eat other animals and black snakes will eat field mice, rats, baby bunnies, squirrels, etc. One of them must have been infected and past it on to the snake.
 

Mat

New Member
Ever wonder why so many VN vets need to talk about their war when other vets of other wars don't?
Maybe because 95 percent, if not more of other wars are all dead. We're down to 600,000 from a total of 10 million from the Vietnam war. I am trying for the last group to survive still able to tie my own shoes and talk. Over the years I have always been fascinated listening to the stories of other war veterans. The man I worked for in Nevada was a Korean war vet, he was a tank driver. He told me once that he and the rest of his crew tried to help the Marines outside the Tanks in the miserable killer low temps to stay alive by letting one or two into the tank to warm up. They left the Tanks idling because if they shut down it was almost impossible to restart them due to the extreme cold. The man told me that he was 8 years old when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and that he and his Father were downtown LA when the news came over radio that they had attacked.

Earlier I also worked in San Diego quite a few times over the years, but I met a retired Marine 1st sgt who was in the 2nd division I think it was there on the Chosen Reservoir during the retreat. His nic name was Sully because his last name was Sullivan. He told me that when the retreat order came down that it was every man for themselves and he caught a ride on an ambulance taking bodies to the rear, he said all the bodies were frozen stiff in the back of the ambulance stacked on top of one another, he said he sat on top of the dead and was glad to get the ride. I liked Sully, he was quite a character. Another great friend who just happened to be a Houston man, his name was Willard Houston, no pun that was his last name. He drove a Tank retriever in WWII France and Germany after D-Day. He told me how the drivers were all instructed to drive fast and not slow down while going thru those towns, the streets were all narrow and he said they were just destroying all the homes lining the streets. He was with his friends sitting around a camp fire in the rear trying to stay warm and a group of German soldiers came up waving a white flag and just surrendered.

One more veteran from the Pacific war, he too was living in Nevada and he told me that he had been a camera film technician on the P-38 aircraft. He actually had his schooling in Galveston at the Naval Air station of that time. He said he got some time off and caught a flight from Guam to Tinian to visit a good friend who was stationed there. He said he had a terrible time finding a flight back to Guam because all the aircraft were going forward and not to the rear. I have more I learned from others, they can't speak now so someone like me has to do it for them. It's history and that is how I look at it, I served in a very specific time frame of history that was being made while I lived. My life starts just after WWII and I saw more things taking place than a lot of generations have seen before me. The entire space program, the first man on the moon, while I was actually fighting in a war. Everyone is a walking history book and has a lot to tell. ;0)
 

Mat

New Member
Mat-Ever hear of the Middle East? 911? Iraq? Afghanistan? Syria?
Well, you haven't made your point yet. You specifically asked about my or maybe our war, I don't know you or your background. I think you made a statement and not a question. So what is your point, do you think we're different because we were in Vietnam. How many of us are on this forum, are there hundreds of us or maybe thousands. You tell me, most normal people would see the forum Topic Military Veterans and expect to see someone sharing something. You will probably see a lot more now that many are leaving facebook. You should maybe not use the word NEED when it comes to a person sharing experiences from a long time ago. I need nothing and ask for nothing, I do like to share while I still can. Maybe the shoe is on the other foot, right.
 

tbeltrans

Member
Ever wonder why so many VN vets need to talk about their war when other vets of other wars don't?
Many of us don't, but if it helps some to talk about their experiences, then by all means, do so. For some, it seems still to be really important to connect with others who had similar experiences all these years later. I see that at the VA, and do understand it. Some want to talk, many don't. To me, the important thing is that those of us who got back to the world, should be free to do what we need to settle in. I had a difficult time mentally "coming home", but didn't understand that until years later, talking to a psychologist at the VA. Fortunately, for the most part, I did adjust eventually. I do read this thread, but have little desire to participate in the stories. However, I do understand that some do. Nothing wrong with that. Isn't a forum a place where discussions that need to be had, should? After all, this is a military veterans sub-forum. Other issues people have are talked about in the other sub-forums.

Tony
 

fmdog44

Well-known Member
Location
Houston, Texas
Many of us don't, but if it helps some to talk about their experiences, then by all means, do so. For some, it seems still to be really important to connect with others who had similar experiences all these years later. I see that at the VA, and do understand it. Some want to talk, many don't. To me, the important thing is that those of us who got back to the world, should be free to do what we need to settle in. I had a difficult time mentally "coming home", but didn't understand that until years later, talking to a psychologist at the VA. Fortunately, for the most part, I did adjust eventually. I do read this thread, but have little desire to participate in the stories. However, I do understand that some do. Nothing wrong with that. Isn't a forum a place where discussions that need to be had, should? After all, this is a military veterans sub-forum. Other issues people have are talked about in the other sub-forums.

Tony
With all due respect it is an insult to other vets of other wars to listen to VN vets as if they had it worse than other vets of greater wars. Add to the social unrest tied to that war WHICH WE LOST I have no more space for the problems of VN vets. I worked with many, many Iraq and Afghanistan vets and never heard one them complain, the just did their job as told.
 

tbeltrans

Member
With all due respect it is an insult to other vets of other wars to listen to VN vets as if they had it worse than other vets of greater wars. Add to the social unrest tied to that war WHICH WE LOST I have no more space for the problems of VN vets. I worked with many, many Iraq and Afghanistan vets and never heard one them complain, the just did their job as told.
Well, we are used to being treated like this when we got home, so it is nothing new. All I ask is that you respect these guys for their service. They did their job too, and I disagree that these guys are insulting veterans of other wars. If you yourself, are a veteran of another war, then this is the first time I have heard that from such a veteran. I have certainly heard similar sentiments from civilians when we came home. For years, until recently, we said nothing about being combat veterans. Usually veterans have a respect for each other, understanding what we went through regardless of which war. Something is certainly amiss about this part of the thread.

Anyway, let it be said I have no argument with you personally and do enjoy your other posts and insights elsewhere, but do feel that if these guys want to talk, let them. The thread is not required reading.

Tony
 

FastTrax

Senior Member
Location
We have no idea
Maybe because 95 percent, if not more of other wars are all dead. We're down to 600,000 from a total of 10 million from the Vietnam war. I am trying for the last group to survive still able to tie my own shoes and talk. Over the years I have always been fascinated listening to the stories of other war veterans. The man I worked for in Nevada was a Korean war vet, he was a tank driver. He told me once that he and the rest of his crew tried to help the Marines outside the Tanks in the miserable killer low temps to stay alive by letting one or two into the tank to warm up. They left the Tanks idling because if they shut down it was almost impossible to restart them due to the extreme cold. The man told me that he was 8 years old when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and that he and his Father were downtown LA when the news came over radio that they had attacked.

Earlier I also worked in San Diego quite a few times over the years, but I met a retired Marine 1st sgt who was in the 2nd division I think it was there on the Chosen Reservoir during the retreat. His nic name was Sully because his last name was Sullivan. He told me that when the retreat order came down that it was every man for themselves and he caught a ride on an ambulance taking bodies to the rear, he said all the bodies were frozen stiff in the back of the ambulance stacked on top of one another, he said he sat on top of the dead and was glad to get the ride. I liked Sully, he was quite a character. Another great friend who just happened to be a Houston man, his name was Willard Houston, no pun that was his last name. He drove a Tank retriever in WWII France and Germany after D-Day. He told me how the drivers were all instructed to drive fast and not slow down while going thru those towns, the streets were all narrow and he said they were just destroying all the homes lining the streets. He was with his friends sitting around a camp fire in the rear trying to stay warm and a group of German soldiers came up waving a white flag and just surrendered.

One more veteran from the Pacific war, he too was living in Nevada and he told me that he had been a camera film technician on the P-38 aircraft. He actually had his schooling in Galveston at the Naval Air station of that time. He said he got some time off and caught a flight from Guam to Tinian to visit a good friend who was stationed there. He said he had a terrible time finding a flight back to Guam because all the aircraft were going forward and not to the rear. I have more I learned from others, they can't speak now so someone like me has to do it for them. It's history and that is how I look at it, I served in a very specific time frame of history that was being made while I lived. My life starts just after WWII and I saw more things taking place than a lot of generations have seen before me. The entire space program, the first man on the moon, while I was actually fighting in a war. Everyone is a walking history book and has a lot to tell. ;0)

Well, you haven't made your point yet. You specifically asked about my or maybe our war, I don't know you or your background. I think you made a statement and not a question. So what is your point, do you think we're different because we were in Vietnam. How many of us are on this forum, are there hundreds of us or maybe thousands. You tell me, most normal people would see the forum Topic Military Veterans and expect to see someone sharing something. You will probably see a lot more now that many are leaving facebook. You should maybe not use the word NEED when it comes to a person sharing experiences from a long time ago. I need nothing and ask for nothing, I do like to share while I still can. Maybe the shoe is on the other foot, right.

Many of us don't, but if it helps some to talk about their experiences, then by all means, do so. For some, it seems still to be really important to connect with others who had similar experiences all these years later. I see that at the VA, and do understand it. Some want to talk, many don't. To me, the important thing is that those of us who got back to the world, should be free to do what we need to settle in. I had a difficult time mentally "coming home", but didn't understand that until years later, talking to a psychologist at the VA. Fortunately, for the most part, I did adjust eventually. I do read this thread, but have little desire to participate in the stories. However, I do understand that some do. Nothing wrong with that. Isn't a forum a place where discussions that need to be had, should? After all, this is a military veterans sub-forum. Other issues people have are talked about in the other sub-forums.

Tony

Well, we are used to being treated like this when we got home, so it is nothing new. All I ask is that you respect these guys for their service. They did their job too, and I disagree that these guys are insulting veterans of other wars. If you yourself, are a veteran of another war, then this is the first time I have heard that from such a veteran. I have certainly heard similar sentiments from civilians when we came home. For years, until recently, we said nothing about being combat veterans. Usually veterans have a respect for each other, understanding what we went through regardless of which war. Something is certainly amiss about this part of the thread.

Anyway, let it be said I have no argument with you personally and do enjoy your other posts and insights elsewhere, but do feel that if these guys want to talk, let them. The thread is not required reading.

Tony

You gentlemen are the sole reason why free speech without repercussions exist in the entire free world yesterday, today and tomorrow. I never had the honor to stand at the gates of HELL to allow free speech and for what you have endured for us will always be revered no matter where or when you fought the wolves for the sheep. Again thanks and may GOD Bless you forever and a day.
 

Mat

New Member
Well, the shoe is on the other foot isn't it. Is there really a better war ? I think the purpose has been buried in emotional feelings but still has some merit, I don't take offense. I do wish people would stop insulting us saying we lost a war that was never a war with a plan or an objective. When I joined the Army in 65 there was scarcely any news about a war or none that I knew of. I had a nice cushy job young as I was working in Mid West City as the Fire Department dispatcher. I just wanted to see something I never saw before, here in the Country of course. I had a lot of fun had some good jobs in the Army and saw a lot of America and the Far East. I was really lucky the first year in the Army and went to West Point TDY with my unit and a small artillery unit, to help train newbies at the Point. I think that had to be the highlight of my 5 years, such a beautiful place that you just felt the presence of all the great men who built this nation. You could walk up to a stone low wall that looks across the Hudson with the same cannon that were there to stop the British with the large chain link under water. I still remember it like it was yesterday and why wouldn't I want to share that with someone. I just have better things to do in such a short time than insult other veterans because I happened to be proud and have nothing to be ashamed of., far from it. I never needed any counseling because I heal myself and adjust for today.
 

tbeltrans

Member
Well, the shoe is on the other foot isn't it. Is there really a better war ? I think the purpose has been buried in emotional feelings but still has some merit, I don't take offense. I do wish people would stop insulting us saying we lost a war that was never a war with a plan or an objective. When I joined the Army in 65 there was scarcely any news about a war or none that I knew of. I had a nice cushy job young as I was working in Mid West City as the Fire Department dispatcher. I just wanted to see something I never saw before, here in the Country of course. I had a lot of fun had some good jobs in the Army and saw a lot of America and the Far East. I was really lucky the first year in the Army and went to West Point TDY with my unit and a small artillery unit, to help train newbies at the Point. I think that had to be the highlight of my 5 years, such a beautiful place that you just felt the presence of all the great men who built this nation. You could walk up to a stone low wall that looks across the Hudson with the same cannon that were there to stop the British with the large chain link under water. I still remember it like it was yesterday and why wouldn't I want to share that with someone. I just have better things to do in such a short time than insult other veterans because I happened to be proud and have nothing to be ashamed of., far from it. I never needed any counseling because I heal myself and adjust for today.

I am glad you addressed that "lost the war" comment, especially since it was emphasized in all caps. It wasn't my intention to do so because I just intended to jump in here and hopefully ask for some respect that wasn't shown when we came home. We were despised back then, and apparently in some quarters, are still despised today. I will continue to read this thread, but unless directly addressed, don't plan to add further comments.

Carry on (or, as you were...)

Tony
 

Mat

New Member
I am glad you addressed that "lost the war" comment, especially since it was emphasized in all caps. It wasn't my intention to do so because I just intended to jump in here and hopefully ask for some respect that wasn't shown when we came home. We were despised back then, and apparently in some quarters, are still despised today. I will continue to read this thread, but unless directly addressed, don't plan to add further comments.

Carry on (or, as you were...)

Tony
Here's some Tributes for men I never personally met, and only because we all were in the same era and time. It has nothing to do with liking someone better than the other, just my way of respecting people I served with. I loved doing it and like to share them, there are a lot that are no longer with us.







 
With all due respect it is an insult to other vets of other wars to listen to VN vets as if they had it worse than other vets of greater wars. Add to the social unrest tied to that war WHICH WE LOST I have no more space for the problems of VN vets. I worked with many, many Iraq and Afghanistan vets and never heard one them complain, the just did their job as told.

A BIG difference is: most Vietnam vets were drafted while Iraq and Afghanistan vets volunteered.

I feel for Vietnam vets who had their lives shattered through no fault of their own. It was either that or go to Canada or jail. I was 16 when the Vietnam war draft ended, so I avoided the war. I don't know what I would have done... gone, I guess. I lucked out, but I feel for those who didn't.

I also feel for vets who volunteered. War is fucked. They're fought mostly to benefit the MIC or big corporations.
 
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jerry old

redneck, but brainy
In the Korean there were no (or limited) demonstrations against the war.
The Korean vets were bitter that their sacrifices were not recognized or honored
(Those that returned, a lot didn't)
The Korean War was three years

Yes, the Vietnam Vets are different-how would you feel if your fellow citizens told you
how stupid you were for going. Naw, it was a war different from all other wars we have been
involved in.
 

Mat

New Member
55 Years ago there were very large military bases and the surroundings were all military families and retired people so you were insulated from all the idiocy that was taking place all over the country. Myself I was at a Nike Site in the cotton fields of Dallas Fort Worth all of 67 and several months into 68. It never reached our world at that time. My friends and I were going into Fort Worth and were mixing in with the local hippies but the military hair cuts were a dead give a way, not saying that it made a difference but it was just more casual back then in the south. Ah yes Cherry Street, Fort Worth the first club The Cellar was there and the happening place, upstairs and a narrow stairway guarded by huge people with flash lights. No tables or chairs just a bunch of pillows on the floor where you flopped down. I have to say they had some really good bands playing at the time. The drinks were all watered down and cough syrup would give you a better buzz heh
 

oldman

Well-known Member
Location
PA
Ever wonder why so many VN vets need to talk about their war when other vets of other wars don't?
I have no problem speaking to another Vietnam Veteran because they understand what it is I am talking about. When I speak to a non-Vietnam Veteran, some seem to either look off into space or have that "I don't care" look. Swapping stories has become good therapy.

Whenever I see someone wearing a cap showing his ship's number or a war veteran, I always thank them. If they want to talk about their experiences in the war, I am willing to listen.
 

ClassicRockr

Well-known Member
Well, I joined the Navy right before I graduated high school. I knew the Draft would be after me, and sure enough, got my Draft Notice shortly after arriving at Great Lakes Naval Training Center. Thank God the Navy didn't release me for anything, because the Draft would've been right there to take me.

Was never in combat, but was in a Destroyer Escort Group (COMDESRON 52) for the Carrier Kitty Hawk. Was on the "gun line" in Nam, but that was it. Only one Westpac Cruise, because I was injured in a roller skating accident, on my way to Nam on my second Westpac Cruise. I was put into the Naval Hospital in Yokosuka, Japan after the accident and my ship pulled out to continue on to Nam. Navy still awarded me a bronze star, to be put on my Vietnam Service Ribbon/Medal, since, at the time of the accident, I was still part of the crew of the ship.

I do know one infantry soldier who was Drafted and in Vietnam. He was shot by a sniper, hospitalized and never returned to his Unit. He doesn't have any problem talking to me about his "Vietnam" time, but knows nothing about my time in the Navy.
 

tbeltrans

Member
As for only Vietnam veterans talking about their experiences, in thinking about this overnight, I realized this isn't universally true. When we came home from Vietnam, we were met with the kind of hostility that the dissenting poster here shows toward us and therefore said nothing about our experiences. When the folks came back from the various conflicts in the Middle East, they were in the media talking about the impact the wars had on their families and lives as they came home. These folks were very open, and we found that they had much the same issues we had. It was from those discussions in the media that I came to understand what we went through in coming home. The culture around their coming home was very different. Frequently in the local news, there was coverage of the welcoming these folks have been getting from their communities and families, which is VERY different from that we got coming home from Vietnam. I, for one, am very glad that these folks are being treated better than we were because they, as did we then, deserve that much, and I am sorry to see that there is still that outright hostility from some here toward Vietnam veterans. I suppose for some, that will never change.

Like any combat veteran, these people didn't just do their jobs and shut up about it. Combat vets from every war have their share of difficulties adjusting, with many incidences of domestic violence, drinking, suicide, etc. There are all manner of stats about these things particularly involving those coming home from the Middle East because things have changed since Vietnam so they ARE able to openly talk about it. At the VA, there is all manner of help for these folks, with suicide hot lines, family counseling, etc.

So I submit that just because the combat vets from the Middle East conflicts may not be talking to the dissenting poster here, that does not mean that there is no such discussion anywhere else. I have a younger brother, a retired Marine, who served two tours in Iraq. He talks about his experiences to me and other veterans, but not to civilians. So it is certainly possible that civilians may get the mistaken idea that the combat vets from the Middle East do not talk about their experiences. As with any traumatic life experience, it is natural for those involved to seek out those who will understand to talk through it. I don't doubt that those who have not had such an experience as combat would not understand this, which is why veterans talk to veterans.

Tony
 
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As for only Vietnam veterans talking about their experiences, in thinking about this overnight, I realized this isn't universally true. When we came home from Vietnam, we were met with the kind of hostility that the dissenting power here shows toward us and therefore said nothing about our experiences. When the folks came back from the various conflicts in the Middle East, they were in the media talking about the impact the wars had on their families and lives as they came home. These folks were very open, and we found that they had much the same issues we had. It was from those discussions in the media that I came to understand what we went through in coming home. The culture around their coming home was very different. Frequently in the local news, there was coverage of the welcoming these folks have been getting from their communities and families, which is VERY different from that we got coming home from Vietnam. I, for one, am very glad that these folks are being treated better than we were because they, as did we then, deserve that much, and I am sorry to see that there is still that outright hostility from some here toward Vietnam veterans. I suppose for some, that will never change.

Like any combat veteran, these people didn't just do their jobs and shut up about it. Combat vets from every war have their share of difficulties adjusting, with many incidences of domestic violence, drinking, suicide, etc. There are all manner of stats about these things particularly involving those coming home from the Middle East because things have changed since Vietnam so they ARE able to openly talk about it. At the VA, there is all manner of help for these folks, with suicide hot lines, family counseling, etc.

So I submit that just because the combat vets from the Middle East conflicts may not be talking to the dissenting poster here, that does not mean that there is no such discussion anywhere else. I have a younger brother, a retired Marine, who served two tours in Iraq. He talks about his experiences to me and other veterans, but not to civilians. So it is certainly possible that civilians may get the mistaken idea that the combat vets from the Middle East do not talk about their experiences. As with any traumatic life experience, it is natural for those involved to seek out those who will understand to talk through it. I don't doubt that those who have not had such an experience as combat would not understand this, which is why veterans talk to veterans.

Tony


Well said. (y)
 


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