100+ Differences between British and American English | British vs. American Vocabulary Words

They have them in Greece and call them a concrete hole in the floor. The art is not missing.
It's many years since I saw holes in floor toilets in Greece, Italy , Turkey or Spain... but they used to be in many places at one time
 

Last edited:
Why on earth stop busy traffic lanes with lights when roundabouts just let the traffic flow naturally?
Well in my experience "natural traffic flow" equals chaos, the traffic light(however annoying) does give structure and a measure of safety.
 

Never heard that term. It’s seems a little more polite than many other phrases that are used. It’s all in the tone.
yes it literally means Shut your mouth... but less harsh...usually someone will say shut your mouth ( in anger).. whereas shut your Gob..altho' not lighthearted, is less harsh, and more likely to be said meaning '' be quiet''
 
Last edited:
Well in my experience "natural traffic flow" equals chaos, the traffic light(however annoying) does give structure and a measure of safety.

Modern roundabouts save lives, have numerous other benefits​

Published on November 12, 2021

a rendering of a roundabout

Roundabouts are an important part of managing traffic in Fort Worth and continue to be added to some intersections across the city.

Don’t confuse a roundabout with a traffic circle. A modern roundabout is a one-way circular intersection where traffic flows counterclockwise around a center island. There are no stop signs or traffic signals, and entering traffic yields to circulating traffic. It is designed to slow the speed of vehicles to typically 25 mph or less. Traffic circles are much larger and often feature stop signs or traffic signals.

According to data from the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety, roundabouts can save lives. Roundabouts reduce crashes by 40% and reduce injury crashes by 75% at intersections that previously used stop signs or signal lights.

Roundabouts reduce fatal and incapacitating collisions by about 90%. They do this in several ways. First, they eliminate the possibility of head-on collisions by redirecting traffic to one-way travel. Second, they reduce speeds as drivers approach the intersection. Finally, because traffic is constantly moving through the intersection, drivers are less inclined to speed up to “beat the light.”
 
Well in my experience "natural traffic flow" equals chaos, the traffic light(however annoying) does give structure and a measure of safety.

I suppose though it requires driving education. All new drivers in the UK are taught how to use them, based on the rules, and a guidence in the 'code'. Something difficult to do in the US perhaps because they are so few and far between there?
 
The younger drivers (under 60) seemed to all have learned to drive by playing Grand Theft Auto relentlessly. :rolleyes:

It's a bit of a sweeping statement though Nathan, and I presume you aren't being serious. I'm easily under 60. Took an advanced driving test at the age of 22, trained by the 'IAM', Institute of Advanced Motorists. Passed that test that was examined by a Class 1 Police Driver Trainer. Then at 23 passed a similar test conducted by the RoSPA, Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents. Then I received training on a track in France by people who compete in European Touring Cars racing.

As a balance, I see older drivers who appear to have forgotten how to drive and fail to see the danger they are putting themselves and others in. There are good and bad drivers of every age.
 
It's a bit of a sweeping statement though Nathan, and I presume you aren't being serious. I'm easily under 60. Took an advanced driving test at the age of 22, trained by the 'IAM', Institute of Advanced Motorists. Passed that test that was examined by a Class 1 Police Driver Trainer. Then at 23 passed a similar test conducted by the RoSPA, Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents. Then I received training on a track in France by people who compete in European Touring Cars racing.

As a balance, I see older drivers who appear to have forgotten how to drive and fail to see the danger they are putting themselves and others in. There are good and bad drivers of every age.
I'm being a bit 'sweeping' yes, as reckless, unsafe youthful drivers(under 50) are a pet peeve of mine. Sounds like driving conditions in the UK may be much more civilized than here, in Southern California.
 
I'm being a bit 'sweeping' yes, as reckless, unsafe youthful drivers(under 50) are a pet peeve of mine. Sounds like driving conditions in the UK may be much more civilized than here, in Southern California.

Well I don't know about South California, I've driven in Michigan; Wisconsin; Florida, which seemed like a huge relief after being in Peru, and then later India. In Peru being driven in a taxi on a gentle bend while going so fast that we were drifting onto the opposite side of the road.

Then later in India, again in a taxi, going the wrong way around a roundabout because it was quicker. Then on a 6-lane motorway, still in India, where everyone seems to drive by staggering two lanes, seemingly to keep their options open, whilst traffic is also moving along the 'shoulder' but in the opposite direction. If you have ever seen the BBC show Top Gear, where they are doing a show in their Burma, at times it was like that. I would recommend the experience to anyone. Just make sure any medical insurance or travel insurance is up to date.

Data used to show that the roads in the UK were the safest in Europe. I doubt we have maintained that, as driving in the UK, from what I now see, seems to have significantly deteriorated, in all ages.
 
Easy enough, a person gives way to traffic from the right in the UK.

Its not just that though. Its also about being in the correct position when driving around the roundabout in order to not cause confusion to othere's, and then indicating at the correct point when leaving the roundabout. And then a slightly different expectation when using a 'spiral roundabout. There are times on a spiral roundabout when you don't want to indicate at all, as that too can cause confusion.
 
Its not just that though. Its also about being in the correct position when driving around the roundabout in order to not cause confusion to othere's, and then indicating at the correct point when leaving the roundabout. And then a slightly different expectation when using a 'spiral roundabout. There are times on a spiral roundabout when you don't want to indicate at all, as that too can cause confusion.
Even better when the continental lorry drivers cut right across when you intend to drive straight on. But we learn.
 
There are very few traffic circles AKA roundabouts in California. There were some in NJ and NY, where I learned to drive, but most are gone now.

DH, born and raised in CA, can't maneuver them without my coaching him through, and oftentimes we go round and round a few times before he can exit. :oops:o_O

When I was 18 and in a traffic circle, a lady clipped my driver's side. Got out of her car and started wailing that her boyfriend was going to be so upset that she had an accident in his new car.

I couldn't believe my ears. I said, "You ran into ME!" She looked at me very dismissively and said, "You were in the lane I needed to be in."

A nearby cop saw the incident and stopped to help sort it out. He shrugged and said, "Traffic circles are nightmares. So many accidents." That was it. He sent us both on our way and she didn't have to pay for the damage to my car.

I hated traffic circles before that and even more since.
 
We have roundabouts on our roads ( not motorways)..every few hundred yards or maybe ever couple of miles.. they're very easy to navigate..however we have a high immigrant population who don't know how, and are often in the wrong lane and causing accidents.. as one famous immigrant comedian once said..I've never been involved in a car accident, but I've seen plenty in my rear view mirror..:D

Anyway @StarSong this is a difficult roundabout in my county.. I'm pretty sure you wouldn't want to tackle this one...I find it easy.. but many competent drivers do not...

the roundabout feed 6 arterial roads.. leading onto 5 mini roundabouts then 6 junctions... . The whole ethos is that you stop at each roundabout and each inner junction and give way to the right ( that would be left in the USA) you do have to have your wits about you, because many drivers panic once they get onto this ''Magic roundabout''.. so not only do we have to be wary and alert on going around it.. but we have to watch out for those who don't.. and at any time there could be 200 or more vehicles on this roundabout at once

b25lY21zOmVkODczMjMxLTU3NmEtNDlkYi1hOGU0LTA1MThmZGY3ZTY1MTphODVmMDllOC01YTgzLTQ1MmUtYWJkNS1hMTI1MTY2YmQ3NzY=.jpg
 
Single lane roundabouts are becoming more common. They help with the flow of traffic and would be more helpful if people could understand the concept of signalling when exiting so those waiting to enter could do so. No thanks to the double or multiple lane ones for me. Good thing they’re rare here, so far.
 
A word I often heard older family members use when I grew up in southern USA , and often wondered if it had British or Irish roots, was the word ’quare’. It was used to mean strange or peculiar, maybe eccentric. As in ‘ those neighbors down the street are a quare bunch.’ Or ‘ I get a quare feeling walking by that house’.

I never hear that word used now. Did anyone else encounter this term growing up? Or know what language it comes from?
 
A word I often heard older family members use when I grew up in southern USA , and often wondered if it had British or Irish roots, was the word ’quare’. It was used to mean strange or peculiar, maybe eccentric. As in ‘ those neighbors down the street are a quare bunch.’ Or ‘ I get a quare feeling walking by that house’.

I never hear that word used now. Did anyone else encounter this term growing up? Or know what language it comes from?
I can't say I've ever heard it here.. and I'm in the unique postion of being born and raised Scottish to Irish grandparents.. and living for the past 50 years in England...
 
A word I often heard older family members use when I grew up in southern USA , and often wondered if it had British or Irish roots, was the word ’quare’. It was used to mean strange or peculiar, maybe eccentric. As in ‘ those neighbors down the street are a quare bunch.’ Or ‘ I get a quare feeling walking by that house’.

I never hear that word used now. Did anyone else encounter this term growing up? Or know what language it comes from?

quare, Irish form of queer
 
quare, Irish form of queer
When you say it is the Irish form of queer do you mean as in the modern usage of queer to mean homosexual? Or do you mean it as in its more original and older use to denote strangeness?
My older relatives (grandparents, great aunts/uncles) never used it to mean homosexual. It makes sense that it would be of Irish origin and for my relatives to be familiar with its usage as most of my ancestors came from Ireland.

I enjoy this thread as I really like exploring language, expressions, etc in different cultures. But especially from the Appalachian cultures.
 
When you say it is the Irish form of queer do you mean as in the modern usage of queer to mean homosexual? Or do you mean it as in its more original and older use to denote strangeness?
My older relatives (grandparents, great aunts/uncles) never used it to mean homosexual. It makes sense that it would be of Irish origin and for my relatives to be familiar with its usage as most of my ancestors came from Ireland.

I enjoy this thread as I really like exploring language, expressions, etc in different cultures. But especially from the Appalachian cultures.

No, in the original sense of strange or peculiar.

Update: Quare might be Germanic in origin but with an Irish Scottish dialect. Queer perhaps being the Engish dialect, but with the same original meaning?
 
Last edited:
No, in the original sense of strange or peculiar.

Update: Quare might be Germanic in origin but with an Irish Scottish dialect. Queer perhaps being the Engish dialect, but with the same original meaning?
Thanks! I never thought about it having a Germanic origin. At any rate, it seems to be one of those words that has fallen out of use and relegated to history.
 


Back
Top