I am sorry to the viewers on this senior site

911

Well-known Member
Location
USA
In the Philippines, this became a practice among rogue cops on New Year's Eve. The very next day, there are several cases in hospitals fighting for their lives. <sigh>
Mimi: Are you from the Philippines? I noticed your text line “namaste.” We use say that to our Sensei that after our martial arts class in the state police. He must have been Filipino. I thought he was Korean. Doesn’t that mean, “I bow to you?”
 

Phoenix

Senior Member
Location
U S
Mimi: Are you from the Philippines? I noticed your text line “namaste.” We use say that to our Sensei that after our martial arts class in the state police. He must have been Filipino. I thought he was Korean. Doesn’t that mean, “I bow to you?”
Yes, one of the meanings of namaste is I bow to you. There's another meaning I like better. It is: when you are in your highest place and I am in mine, we are one. I use is because of a time when I looked into the philosophies and beliefs of others and decided to adopt it.

Mark apologised, I think that showed courage and a willingness to stand accountable. In my profession, we call that growth. It seems counterproductive to me to keep criticizing him. Shame is not a good teacher
I agree one hundred percent. We need to honor those who are willing to grow.
 

hellomimi

Namaste 🙏
Location
City of Angels
Mimi: Are you from the Philippines? I noticed your text line “namaste.” We use say that to our Sensei that after our martial arts class in the state police. He must have been Filipino. I thought he was Korean. Doesn’t that mean, “I bow to you?”
Yes, I'm Filipino.

I adapted the greeting because it's so positive. @Keesha and @Phoenix are correct. Everyone I've bowed to make the greeting regardless of their beliefs have reacted positively to it.

@911, Namaste. Cuidate (kwee-dah-te).
 

911

Well-known Member
Location
USA
Mark apologised, I think that showed courage and a willingness to stand accountable. In my profession, we call that growth. It seems counterproductive to me to keep criticizing him. Shame is not a good teacher
Truer words were never spoken.
 

Packerjohn

Packerjohn
Location
Canada
I am not saying that we here in the U.S. could never get to that point where most of us didn’t own a weapon, but with having and living by the 2nd Amendment for almost 250 years, it wouldn’t happen overnight. For example; if my weapon was taken away, I would feel like something wasn’t right. I seldom leave my home without my weapon.
This sure is a strong contrast between an American & a Canadian. You said, "I seldom leave my home without my weapon". I say I haven't owned a gun since I was 12 years old & used to hunt squirrels out on the farm. Since then I have never owned a gun & I guess I could say, very truthfully, "I always leave home without my weapon, since I don't have a weapon & don't need one."
 

911

Well-known Member
Location
USA
This sure is a strong contrast between an American & a Canadian. You said, "I seldom leave my home without my weapon". I say I haven't owned a gun since I was 12 years old & used to hunt squirrels out on the farm. Since then I have never owned a gun & I guess I could say, very truthfully, "I always leave home without my weapon, since I don't have a weapon & don't need one."
You and I live different lives. I wore my weapon for my job for 37 years. Even traveling to and from work, I carried a different weapon. When not working, it was just natural to carry my weapon. As a state trooper, if I would have been or would be in the middle of a grocery store or mall and an active shooter would suddenly appear and open fire, I would feel derelict in my duties not to protect the others, even being retired.

There is a rather large difference in societies between Canada and the U.S. It seems that we here in the U.S. can go months without any incidents, but then we may have 2 or 3 incidents within a few weeks or a few months apart. Depending on which website you look at, supposedly, there are some 400,000,000 guns in American’s hands. To me, it’s best to be prepared.
 

Sunny

SF VIP
Location
Maryland
Since then I have never owned a gun & I guess I could say, very truthfully, "I always leave home without my weapon, since I don't have a weapon & don't need one."
Well said, Packerjohn. I can truthfully say the exact same thing, and I am very much an American. Most Americans do not own guns. It's just the others who make the most noise about it.
 

Youngatheart

New Member
Location
North Vancouver
I'm a Canadian & we don't have that problem here. My brother died at the end of September. When the RCMP (police) came, the 1st thing they asked my still living brother is if there are any firearms around? My brother didn't know. Guess my dead brother had a firearm but, of course, it was registered & when they police came they wanted it. Yes, there are some illegal firearms around here but that has mostly to do with the illegal drug trade. In a small town I never heard of anyone getting shot.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52346447
 

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